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Would a background in psychology help in this field?

Regarding sports and entertainment management, would a background in psychology or even a minor in psychology help? I have taken the FBLA exam in sports and entertainment management and there were a few terms that were correlated to psychology #psychology #entertainment #sports-marketing


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Daniela’s Answer

Hi Maddie,


Sport psychology is a proficiency that uses psychological knowledge and skills to address optimal performance and well-being of athletes, developmental and social aspects of sports participation, and systemic issues associated with sports settings and organizations.


The proficiency provides a recognized set of standards to guide appropriate training of psychologists who wish to practice sport psychology. Many strategies and procedures are used by sport psychology proficiency to address problems faced by athletes and sports participants. Some of the principal areas include:




  • Cognitive and behavioral skills training for performance enhancement. goal setting; imagery and performance planning; concentration and attention control strategies; development of self-confidence, self-esteem and competence in sports; cognitive-behavioral self-regulation techniques; emotion management, sportsmanship and leadership skills.




  • Counseling and clinical interventions. athletic motivation; eating disorders and weight management; substance abuse; grief, depression, loss and suicide; overtraining and burnout; sexual identity issues; aggression and violence; athletic injury and rehabilitation; career transitions and identity crises.




  • Consultation and training. team building; sports organization consultation; systems interventions with parents and families involved in youth sports participation; education of coaches regarding motivation, interpersonal and leadership skills and talent development; education of coaches and administrators regarding early identification and prevention of psychological difficulties.




I hope this information can help you in your doubts. More in:


http://www.apa.org/ed/graduate/specialize/sports.aspx


Best!


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Stuart’s Answer

Hey Maddie,


I would say that in almost all instances, it would be valuable to have that type of background--even if it isn't necessarily pertinent to your day-to-day routine. I say that because no matter what industry you work in, communication and the ability to effectively work with others is going to be a major component of the job, and with that, requires emotional intelligence. I think if nothing else, I have found that individuals who understand others, and know how to navigate human emotion, tend to be some of the most successful people, so in those instances, a psychology background could prove to be immensely helpful. You can always learn how to do a job, but understanding others is something that I think is far more innate, and would prove to be a great starting point for your career in my opinion!


Hope that helps!


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Kendall’s Answer

Hi Maddie,


There is definitely a benefit to understanding psychology - in almost any field, I'd imagine. The question I have, is are YOU interested in psychology? If so, then you should study what you're most excited about, and let that inform your path in sports/entertainment management. I've worked for six years in entertainment, and people rarely ask what I studied in school - the more relevant question is where I've worked professionally, and the kind of work I'm interested in doing professionally. But I studied English literature in college, because it was what I liked the best. My co-workers in entertainment studied everything: business, psychology, political science. It's most important to do well in school - and it helps if you like what you're studying - and then work hard pursuing your career goals when you graduate.


Hope that helps!


Kendall


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Felicia G’s Answer

Hey Maddie! There are actually jobs in sports psychology so that's probably where those questions arose. A course or two in psychology would probably cover what you need to know.


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