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Is it a must to speak a foreign language in order to be a sport analyst and be in the broadcasting industry?

I am asking this question because I want to be a sports analyst and radio and television broadcaster. #sports #broadcast-media #sports-media #broadcast-television #broadcast #radio-broadcasting


Hi, Cailon! Thanks for asking this question. I don't know if I would use the word "must" in answering this question, though. The wider the net you cast, the likelier you are to snare fish. So the more languages you speak, the larger the number of places where you could find work. It may be harder to find work at places that speak your specific language because there are probably a lot of people who do. If you know more languages, you could fill a niche that's not currently being filled. Barry Abrams

Thank you Barry. I never thought about a new language in this light because I never thought about working outside of the United States and now I feel better about learning a new language and making myself more marketable. I still really only work in the U.S., but I am not shutting the door on the rest of the world. Cailon S.

Thank you for taking time out of your schedule to respond to my question. Cailon S.

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Hillary’s Answer

It isn't a must, but it would certainly help set you apart from other applicants. Additionally, consider today's athletes and how diverse their backgrounds might be. While you may not be fluent in a second language, could you pronounce names in an authentic manner? It matters to the viewer and certainly your eventual employer.


Thank you so much Hillary. Cailon S.

As Hillary is saying, that pronunciation aspect can be a key or make you standout from the rest when you are able to pronounce names and surnames that others couldn't even imagine. For example, I have seen a lot of people struggling to pronounce names in Spanish, because they don't have any grasp in a foreign language. They would strive even more if they said French, Arabic or Russian names. On the other hand, people who are bilingual or polyglot would definitely excel at this. Since athletes nowadays are so diverse (Black British, White Hispanics, etc), it is important to know how to say their names correctly. Christian O.

Thanks Christian. You are right Cailon S.

If I do well in my Spanish class I might take on learning another language. Cailon S.

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Brandon’s Answer

It's not a must but like everyone has said it's a great skill to have and it allows you to future proof your job security a little more. Learning a second language, particularly Spanish if you're referring to U.S. broadcasting, is something you will always use throughout your entire life both in and out of the workplace.


http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2016/hispanic-influence-reaches-new-heights-in-the-us.html


Thanks Brandon. I am so blessed to be able to get your professional point of view on my question. Cailon S.

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Caleb Reid’s Answer

Going off of what Roman said, it's not a must but it's a very valuable skill to have. For example, if you can speak more than one language, you're not limited to just production and opportunities are open to you in bilingual production (Spanish speaking networks, etc.) My one regret in college is not pursuing a minor in Spanish after already having 10 hours of college credit from passing the CLEP exam.


This is interesting. So you were able to test out of Spanish. Fortunately for me, I am taking Spanish in my major. I never thought about the CLEP test. I did take two years of high school Spanish. Cailon S.

Thanks Caleb. Cailon S.

Thanks very much. Actually I am doing well in my Spanish class right now. Cailon S.

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Elaine’s Answer

I"m not in the industry but being bilingual is always a plus in any career you choose! You can never have too much education.

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Roman’s Answer

Not a must, but incredibly valuable if you can do it. We're in the communication business, and the ability to communicate with a wider audience would stand out when applying for a job.


Thank you Roman. I would like to work at ESPN some day. Cailon S.

There are a lot of opportunities. Good luck. Roman Modrowski

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Charles’s Answer

No not at all unless you plan on working in Texas, Florida, California, or Canada.


Thank you, Charles. I did not think it was but it is a requirement for my major. Cailon S.

There's a ton of gen Ed classes in college you may never find any relevance to your career other than to get you to buy credit hours. I'd take Spanish as a lot of people speak that regionally. There are opportunities for media outlets who report to specific communities. Such as middle eastern, Chinese, etc. Charles Forbes

Charles, you are absolutely right about the general Ed classes. I am taking Spanish to fulfill a part of my communication major. Thank you for this information. Cailon S.

Taking a second language course may sound probably useless in the short term, but the benefits are incredible. Knowing a second language not only allows you to communicate with other people, but also makes you more empathic and develop your interpersonal skills if you practice with native speakers. You will also gain knowledge in areas you could never have imagined, like the arts, music, literature if you get engaged in the language. Christian O.

Very good Christian. Thanks again. Cailon S.

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Elaine’s Answer

I'm not in the industry but being bilingual is always a plus in any career you choose! You can never have too much education.

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