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What are the steps to becoming a Registered Nurse

I am very interested in taking this path and I'm a high school student who wants to get a heads tart on heading in the right direction. #nursing #nurse #registered-nurses

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Doc’s Answer

Cari the steps to becoming a Registered Nurse (RN) is a process that can take from 2–4 years and that can vary greatly in cost. The cost and the time involved depends on how quickly you want to get your RN training done – and the steps you choose to becoming a Registered Nurse.

STEP 1: EARN YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA – Acquiring a high school diploma or its equivalent is an essential first step to becoming a registered nurse. Aspiring registered nurses should take courses in chemistry, biology, and anatomy. Since nurses also need effective speaking and communication skills, students should work to acquire these attributes and take courses that help develop them.

STEP 2: COMPLETE YOUR RESISTER NURSE EDUCATION – The three different educational pathways to become an RN include earning a diploma from a hospital, an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) from a community college (or vocational school), or a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) from a 4-year college or university. Some teaching hospitals still offer 3-year diploma programs in nursing; however, these programs are rare. Most RNs earn associate degrees or bachelor's degrees in nursing.
• ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING (ADN) – In order to become an RN, candidates need to have earned at minimum an ADN, many RNs enter the profession by earning an Associate Degree in Nursing first. ADN programs are available at community and vocational colleges and typically last 2-3 years. They combine classroom instruction with hands-on training in hospitals, clinics or other healthcare settings.
• BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN) – Offered at colleges and universities, BSN programs typically take 4-years to complete; however, students who are already have their Associate Degree in Nursing may be able to complete accelerated programs. Aspiring registered nurses may choose to gain more comprehensive training by earning a BSN, RNs who hold associate degrees tend to pursue bachelor's degrees later in their careers. These degree programs are particularly beneficial to students who wish to pursue clinical or administrative positions.
BSN programs focus on more advanced nursing methodology and clinical training, compared to ADN degree programs. They also equip students with the administrative and critical thinking skills necessary for advanced positions in the field.

STEP 3: ATTAIN YOUR LICENSE – All 50 states require nurses to obtain a license before starting a job, though the specifics vary for each state. Students who have completed a hospital nursing program or who have earned an associate's degree or a bachelor's degree in nursing must pass the NCLEX-RN. This exam measures the competencies, knowledge, and skills that new nurses need to perform their jobs safely and effectively.

Hope this is helpful Cari
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Tamika’s Answer

Hi! John's answer was very detailed. However, I recommend that you go to a 4 year college or university to receive a Bachelor of Science. Associates and diplomas are phasing out as many employers require a Bachelor degree for entry level nursing.

Nursing is very diverse (pediatrics, critical care, forensics, surgery)so if you do not like the specialty that you choose, I recommend that you explore another specialty to find your niche and prevent burn out. If you love to travel, I have heard that travel nursing is a good option for younger nurses. Travel nursing allows you to explore new places, sometimes even overseas. Good luck future nurse!

Tamika recommends the following next steps:

Some specialties may require additional coursework
Getting certified in your area increases your income
Always do at least one year of bedside nursing before pursuing non bedside nursing ( case management, information technology)
I recommend doing at least one year of bedside nursing before pursuing any graduate degrees.
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Margarita’s Answer

Nursing is an awesome career to consider, and there are some classes in high school you can take that will prepare you for nursing school.
Human Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry and Algebra are awesome foundational classes to have under your belt.
And keep in mind that a career in nursing also requires strong communication skills, technology/computer skills and language arts. That said, social studies, psychology and English/grammar are just as important.
Another way to prepare and strengthen your college application is to Volunteer at your local hospital in any capacity; meaning be open to administrative opportunities as well as clinical ones. Also, take a local CPR class. These experiences give you some
Exposure to the healthcare setting.

These are some great ways to prepare! I wish you the best!



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