Skip to main content
5 answers
6
Asked 615 views

What else can I do to stand out to higher level colleges

I receive good grades and do extra activities, but I just want to be as prepared as I can. #college-advice

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

5 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Doc’s Answer

Brody setting yourself apart from other students during college application season is crucial to your success. Colleges and universities continue to see an increase in the number of applicants each year. While admission trends are encouraging, acceptance rates remain competitive and selective. Applicants need solid materials to rise to the top and stand out from others.

HOW TO STAND OUT ON YOUR COLLEGE APPLICATION
• ACADEMICS – The college admissions process evaluates applicants' readiness for study and potential for academic excellence. Stand-out applications showcase achievement, merit, and previous academic success. Taking honors classes or AP courses can give you a significant advantage. Most colleges generally prefer applicants with a B in an honors program over those with an A in standard courses because it shows initiative. Many local community colleges also offer courses for high school students that grant college credit, which can similar bolster applications.
• EXTRACURRICULARS – Admissions departments often look to extracurricular choices to help assess potential students. When selecting extracurricular activities, candidates should aim for quality over quantity. Demonstrating your passion and commitment to 1-2 activities related to your interests will reflect better on you than including a drawn-out list of disparate activities.
• RECOMMENDATION LETTERS – Solid relationships and mentorships are crucial for college admission. The best applicants take the time to get to know their teachers, counselors, and other mentors in high school, which can pay off in academic support. During the application process, candidates can reach out to these mentors for recommendation letters and other admission materials. Even when not required, these letters can significantly strengthen your applications. When deciding who to ask to write a recommendation letter for you, choose a mentor who honestly understands your potential for academic success and can advocate for you. Be sure to contact them well in advance of your application deadline — 5-6 weeks, ideally.
• ESSAY – The personal essay component is often the most important part of your application. Consider the prompt as an opportunity to appear genuine and authentic while showcasing your writing and critical thinking skills. Admissions officers are most interested in how you describe yourself — your experience, qualifications, and future goals — and taking a thoughtful, reflective approach demonstrates your potential for academic success.
• APPLY EARLY – Applying early helps to get the paperwork process out of the way, shows initiative, and gives you an advantage over the competition. Most colleges admit about half of their total applicants, but acceptance rates jump significantly for students applying through early action or early decision options. It's worth noting, however, that some schools have exclusivity rules for early decision, meaning that if they accept you on early decision, you must then choose to attend that school. You can't apply to other schools at the same time. Check with your prospective schools for more specifics.

Hope this helpful Brody
Thank you comment icon Thank You Jake. Alone, we can do so little; together we can do so much. Doc Frick
2
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Jayme’s Answer

Grades (test scores where applicable)
Volunteering Hours
Extra Curricular Activities (beyond the books / grades)
Essay Strength - talk about the work you did; volunteer, sports, etc.
Well rounded is the key and beyond the books
References from teachers, Alumni, employers (also ask them to review your essay)
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

V’s Answer

know that what colleges want is on their web site -though it can be vague.
I agree with Kathleen. Working somewhere shows that you are not only dependable, you know how to co-exist and be a team player. Working does not always have to be for money either. You can even start your business like lawn mowing or baby sitting or dog sitting. As long as you show consistency and continuity, that's really what colleges are looking for.
Internships are another way to do so. This can be free and informal as well. Like you can shadow a doctor for a week or more - to see how a medic's life really is - if you are interested in medicine.
Since you are good at academics, look for some scholastic exams that are international in nature - like AMC exams for math. Good score in that helps you get noticed by colleges.
I would also suggest to check out professional associations in the subject area of your interest and becoming student member of that. This will not only shows your dedication but your willingness to go extra mile and drive to pave your own way.

Most importantly - If you did all that you can do and the college you want does not select you then it is not in any way reflective of your abilities. Chin up and get going!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Rickey’s Answer

Hey Brody,

Yes, if you want to stand out to colleges, I recommend the following things you could do:

*Volunteer in the area your most passionate about
*Particiapte in other extracirricular activities that interest you such as debate, national honor society, band, sports, first robotics, etc.
*The quality of your essay is also a good way to stand out
*Take a toastmasters course or something similar to improve your communication as this is a key skill you will need in college and after college. In my opinion, anyone that can communicate effectively has an advantage.
*Letters of recommendation are also great
*Studying abroad if possible is also a good way to stand out
*Work experience is a good good way to stand out as it shows a certain level of maturity
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kathleen’s Answer

Hi Brody!
Internships and work experiences are a great way to explore future careers and will not only help you stand out to colleges, but teach you skills for life (which you may not learn through academics).

If you don't already have work experience, I'd ask your guidance counselor/a family member/mentor for support in finding something!

Internships in a field/potential major you are interested in AND/OR jobs in retail/food service are valuable experiences for young people. In either setting, you will learn about communication, problem solving, workplace culture, taking initiative, and more - all skills that prepare you for college/the working world. Learning these skills during high school/holding down a job will certainly attract attention from colleges, and maybe help you decide your future career path after graduation.
0