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Whats your first interview like?

#interviewing-skills

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Jovina studies show that about 30 percent of hiring decisions are made within the first five minutes — and 5 percent are made in the first 60 seconds — so you have to look the part. Your appearance not only influences your interviewer’s perception of you, but it also affects how you feel about yourself. Ideally, you’ve talked to a current employee or looked around the campus and have an understanding of how casual or formal the company is. Then, dress slightly above that to show respect. Use a firm handshake, smile, make eye contact, sit tall and lean in to show you’re engaged. Be present in the moment, and really listen. Rather than think about what you want to say in the future, focus on what the hiring manager is saying now and react in kind. It should be a fluid, back-and-forth conversation. And bring a lot of energy! If you are excited about the position, the interviewer will get excited about you.

Most interviews start the same way: some small talk and banter, followed by some version of, “Tell me about yourself.” This open-ended question is a great way for you to take control of your story and start building the case for why you’re perfect for this job. On the surface, the interviewer just wants to learn more about you and what you want. Beyond that is a second test: whether you can concisely talk about yourself without rambling and including unnecessary details, and show through your words and body language that you are a fit. In an interview it’s important to come across as likable. So, to maximize confidence, your energy should be focused on building a rapport with your interviewer rather than impressing them. We often get the idea that confidence is about holding court whereas it’s more to do with putting people at ease. It helps to focus on connecting with people rather than focusing on the performance.

Hope this is helpful Jovina

Doc recommends the following next steps:

KNOW YOUR RESUME – As a candidate, you should know your resume like the back of your hand. When applying for any job interview, anything on your resume is at the interviewer’s disposal. Implementing this strategy will definitely help you ace your job interviews. It is your responsibility to convince the interviewer that you can come in and do the job. Speaking intelligently about each of your previous positions is one of the best ways to ace your job interview every single time.
KNOW THE POSITION – After getting an interview, you need to study the job description to truly understand what the interviewer is looking for. If the description calls for attentiveness to detail, you will want to tailor the discussion accordingly. Knowing this, you can navigate the interview and discuss examples from previous jobs that will exemplify this trait. Do this for all significant traits or qualities that you identify in the job description. This is one of the most prominent ways to ace your job interview.
BE YOURSELF – No matter how badly you want the job, it you aren’t a good match, you aren’t a good match. Never try to be what you “think” the job require. Let your true self shine through and you’ll send off the postive energy you’ll need to ace your job interview. If you aren’t being true to yourself, the interviewer will sense your lack of authenticity right away.
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sandy’s Answer

In my first interview, I was asked to answer a set of the questions which were all related how I did the things by working with the others. I overthought about how I should answer those questions as I wanted to get higher score . At the end, it is the opposite result. The lesson learn for me is that being authentic about myself when answering the personality and working style related question is more important than trying to be someone else.
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Samantha’s Answer

It can be nerve wracking so what I suggest is to practice practice practice. Your confidence will build and it will make your brain think that you have already done the interview. Your future manger will make a decision fairly quickly so it good to show them you.
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Mike’s Answer

Key to a successful interview is to bring your personality into it. Yes they are interviewing you to see your experience and problem solving skills, but they also want to see what you bring to the team culture. Understand what the employer is looking for and bring your experience with that to the forefront. On another note, I tend to get nervous going into interviews so I usually bring a paperclip with me to keep in my hand to avoid fidgeting. Just a tip that I picked up along the way.
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Whitney’s Answer

Interviews can vary so much, but if you come as prepared as possible, you can stand out no matter what that interview format entails:
1. Know the role you're applying for - What are the skills they are looking for? How much experience is needed? What does the job description say?

2. Know as much as you can about the company - research, research, research! Look at their website. What are the core values? What news has been announced about the company recently?

3. Know as much as you can about the person who will be interviewing you. LinkedIn is more important now than ever. If you don't have a LinkedIn profile, create one. Look up the person who you will be interviewing with. How long have they been at the company? What has their career experience looked like? What college did they go to? Be curious and learn as much as you can.

4. Bring a positive and can-do attitude, and be confident! You made it to the interview, so you should be proud of yourself! Being positive and coachable can go a LONG way. Be prepared to discuss your resume, but also bring your personality. Let them know why you want the position and how you can help them achieve what they're looking to achieve.

5. Come prepared with questions. What are next steps in the interview process? What does success look like in this position? What can you expect day-to-day? What does a career path look like here?

Best of luck to you! Hopefully this was helpful!
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Chiranjib’s Answer

My first interview was with a tech company in India. The individual grilled me for a full 45 minutes and asked me lots of questions about where I hailed from, how I was doing etc. Then he moved on to the serious stuff. He asked lots of questions about the skills I had listed on my CV. He asked me to draw diagrams related to certain instrumentation designs. I did well for some of the questions, for some others, I did not do well. Long story short, I did not get the offer. But over the course of time, I understood well, where I did not do well and plugged in the gaps.

So, my tips if you wish to do well in your first interview:
1. Tailor your CV for the job. There is no one-size fit all CV. Depending on the job, one has to customize the CV.
2. Do not manipulate any fact. Know that eventually it will be found out.
3. Verify your CV thoroughly for the skills you have mentioned. Questions can be asked from any of those skills. If you are not sure about a skill or say you have lost touch with the skill, over the years, it's best to not mention it.
4. Prepare well for the interview. Know the organization well. Read about their work, what their leaders do, check out their profiles on LinkedIn.
5. Always be very respectful and professional. Even if you are getting interviewed over a virtual meeting, be properly dressed, as if it is a face-to-face interview.
6. Maintain eye contact with the interviewers.
7. Carry a notebook. It may be useful if you wish to jot down notes or explain something to the interviewer.
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Brayden’s Answer

Hello!

Typically in a first interview the hiring manager will want to learn a little about you and your interests as they are trying to better understand the type of person you are and if you will fit the job position. They might also ask about previous job experience and what you might of done in previous work in order to make sure that your experience you listed on your resume matches. Many times people get worried about an interview but you really just want to keep things casual and understand that they too are human and you are really there just to have a conversation. I always think its smart to come with some prepared questions to ask the manager. I wouldn't spend to much time on these questions they can be as easy as "what is one thing you like about working here". A question like that just makes the manager know that you are attentive and care not only about the interview but about the job and making connections.

Good luck!
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Nandita’s Answer

It is definitely intimidating when it is your first time interviewing, but practice makes perfect. Before your first interview, you should definitely know your resume well and be able to talk about the different experiences you have had in each role you have listed. Additionally, you should have a rough idea of a response to the basic behavioral interview questions - like tell me about yourself, what are your strengths and weaknesses, etc.! It is easy to find these popular interview questions by searching online as well.
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Chuck’s Answer

My first interview as long ago and I don't remember much other than it was completely terrifying and I was so nervous that my hands were sweating and couldn't hold my resume papers steady. I do remembered I read some books on it and prepared somewhat. Note the web was not invented yet at the time and we met in person at the company instead of a phone or webcam.

But perhaps what your question really is: "How do I succeed on my first interview and get a job?"

If true, maybe I can offer a few words to help. Over the years I was acting as hiring manager and interviewed many people. For someone getting started in their career or switching fields, it's quite obvious from the resume you have already submitted that you have limited experience and the company doesn't expect it. Thus a good interviewer will generally avoid any questions of hands-on experience as that's evident already and avoid wasting time. What we really want to know is how well will your personality fit into the team, how willing are you to learn new things, and how eager or passionate are you about the job position. With this in mind, it's really important that you answer authentically as best you can so both you and the interviewer will learn if there is a good match. Now assuming this is exactly what you wanted, here are a few tips:
1) Arrive early to fill out extra paperwork that's generally needed. Never late.
2) If possible, choose a morning interview time so you will be more refreshed than a late afternoon time for both you and the interviewer.
3) Avoid heavy foods right before your interview.
4) Dress appropriately for your field.
5) Compose yourself with a good and relaxed posture, your face neutral with a slight smile like the Mona Lisa painting.
6) Maintain eye contact and stay alert, never a sleepy boring look. Practice in front of a mirror or record yourself on the phone.
7) Try to answer with a positive note or in the affirmative.
8) Firm handshakes, not tight like squeezing or limp like you don't want get dirty. But with the covid and social distancing your interviewer might skip this.
9) Always thank your interviewer for their time and make a quick statement of your skills and what makes you want to join the company.
10) Ask for email or street address contact and send a thank you card right away with a few sentences of your skills again and your interest in the position and company.

But most importantly, relax! Think positive. It's your first interview and you will have many more in your career.
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Rachel’s Answer

Practice with friends and family. Look up challenging questions and ask your friends/family to ask them to you. Don't focus so much on the answer, but more about the critical thinking you would do to get to the answer. A lot of times, interviewers will ask questions like "How many golf balls will fit in the Empire State Building?" or "How many blades of grass are on a soccer field?" They aren't expecting you to know the actual answer. They want you to show them how you would get to the answer - share with them the steps you would take to solving a problem.

Get comfortable with sharing your successes unapologetically. Write down all the things you are good at and spotlight those. Don't talk down about yourself. One time in a "corporate" interview I was showing the interviewer my resume and I said something along the lines of "well that job there was just a silly high school job" and he critiqued me and told me that that job is just as important as any other, and to take myself more seriously!
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Elizabeth’s Answer

My first interview involved questions mainly just about myself and my experiences. Some questions I was asked were:
- what are your strengths?
- what are your weaknesses?
- tell me about an obstacle you have faced and how you overcame it.

To prepare for an interview like this, my advice would be to think about experiences you have had in your life (from jobs, school, etc.) and how those experiences can help you answer some of these questions and tell a story about you. If you google "common behavioral interview questions" you will find a ton of examples, so you can have a better idea of what to expect. Another thing you can do is ask a friend or family member to interview you for practice.
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