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How many hours do entrepreneurs should put?

I am wondering myself as a student when I become ready for it, how any hours should I put daily/weekly into my business? #college #business #finance #accounting #entrepreneurship

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Ben’s Answer

There really isn't a fixed amount of hours you put in as an entrepreneur. Many entrepreneurs put in numerous amounts of hours into their work and honestly many entrepreneurs wish that they had more time. Often many entrepreneurs may even lose sleep, because they are dedicating their time, grinding, hustling, and pushing forward to reach their goals. I am not an entrepreneur, but I have researched this topic before and I personally know a few entrepreneurs (one of them is the founder of CareerVillage, Jared Chung!) To be an entrepreneur you have to have a certain mindset. Some have it others don't. That's perfectly fine. You have to have a passion, a drive, and believe in your business 120%! If you are willing to put in your blood, sweat, and tears into your business then go for it. Best of luck with your journey!

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Ken’s Answer

Hi!


Here are a few articles that might give you more of an idea of what it takes.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB123498006564714189
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/207488


The main question about being in business for yourself is: Do you own the business? - or - Does the business own you?


We have a family business and the later seems to be true - the situation seems like the business owns us. We put in as many hours as needed. If you have someone who has the your same sense of ownership and concern and management skills and your trust, you can take a breather. Someone like that is hard to find, and you will be lucky to find someone like that.


Let me know if this helps. I do not know if this is what you were looking for, but it is pretty much how real life is.

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Donald’s Answer

Hi.


You should prepare yourself to put in very long hours. When you're starting a business, there are so many things to be done and many have to get done before the "next" step. When you form your company you first have to decide what you will do, then how and where you'll do it, what permits, licenses may be required, how to get the forms to apply for them, where to get the funding....all before you deliver your first product or service.


But, when you love what you're doing, the hours are like minutes. When you're fulfilling your dream, the tasks which you accomplish, small or large, all give a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment. You'll be learning all the time and if you love to learn, it's that much more satisfying.


When we started our business, we were working at other jobs, my wife was in school, we were both traveling and we were forming our company. It's a lot of work and not all companies succeed....however, the lessons you learn either way stick with you for life. Getting the first check for your product or service is indeed a very satisfying event....


Good Luck,
Don Knapik

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Stephanie’s Answer

https://kanbanize.com/dimitar-on-startups/en_US/how-many-hours-should-a-start-up-founder-work/


http://tech.co/entrepreneurs-startup-work-hours-2014-08


It really depends on what type of business it is, how many hours you have available, and how quickly you want to accelerate your business launch and development efforts.


If you are still in school or working a full time job, it's reasonable you'll only have a finite number of hours on the nights and weekends to work. You can start smaller and perfect your model with a minimum viable product (or concept) and get some early customers and feedback, then scale up when you have more time (and/or funding). Many entrepreneurs start their businesses as a part time thing in the interest of time and financial security and then don't start working full time at it until they know it's going to be successful and can sustain them as a sole income source.

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