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What would a day in the life of a nurse anesthetist be like?

I am a 17 year old who wants to be a nurse anesthetist and am curious as to how their work life is. #nursing #registered-nurses #college #nurse #healthcare #medicine #anesthesiology

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Ricardo’s Answer

1. What's life like as a CRNA? Let's take a closer look. Every day, nurse anesthetists monitor patients during surgery. This requires preparing and administering drugs before anesthesia, managing patients' airways, and pulmonary status during surgery and closely observing their physical reaction to drugs.
2. Nurse anesthetists are one of the happiest careers in the United States. ... As it turns out, nurse anesthetists rate their career happiness 3.8 out of 5 stars which puts them in the top 16% of careers.
3. CRNA school is extremely difficult, but for those who are determined to become CRNAs, it can be done. The CRNA program is very intensive, as it's a graduate level program. ... Students have to find a way to balance their coursework, studying, and clinical experiences so that they do well in CRNA school.
4. The great thing about being a CRNA is work life balance is one of the advantages of the job. As a CRNA, you are usually able to make the decisions on what you want in your personal life rather than have your job tell you where you need to be.
5.Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) earn a nationwide average of $189,190 per year according to the BLS; this makes CRNAs the highest-paying type nursing job by a significant margin.
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Lauren’s Answer

Hi Mhaya!

I have my masters in Biomedical Sciences, I did this because I wanted to become either an MD, NP, or CRNA. I have since changed my mind, although I still think they are all incredible career paths. While I was still on that path, I reached out to nurses, doctors, PAs, CRNAs, and NPs, and asked if I could ask them questions and shadow them. I reached out to my own providers as well as friends and family that were in the field or who knew people in the field. I eventually found someone who was able to help get me into the hospital with a shadow program. You may even be able to reach out to a hospital administrator directly and ask if they have a shadow program!

I shadowed 3 different CRNAs, I was able to spent the day with them, and keep in touch to ask questions as they came up. They were all so kind and helpful!

Good luck!
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