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What is the difference between college and university?

I'm wondering if it would matter on a resume if you went to a university or not or something
#college #university #resume

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Laura’s Answer

Short answer would be no, it does not matter if you attend a "college" or "university," there is no difference between an upper education institution whose name uses "college" or "university." Previously, "college" would indicate a smaller school and a "university" would indicate a larger school, but for the most part, this is no longer the case. One aspect you do want to pay attention to is what degrees does the college or university offer? 2 year? Associates? Bachelors? Certificates? Community colleges typically will offer only associates and certificates and universities and colleges offer 4 year bachelors degrees.
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Chris’s Answer

Colleges are often smaller institutions that emphasize undergraduate education in a broad range of academic areas. Universities are typically larger institutions that offer a variety of both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Many universities are also committed to producing research.

US News says that one difference, experts say, is that universities offer both undergraduate and graduate programs, while many colleges focus solely on undergrads. Oftentimes schools with "college" in their name are smaller institutions that emphasize undergraduate education, Johanna Fishbein, head of university advising at the United World College of South East Asia's Dover Campus, an international school, said by email. This is not a strict rule, since there are a number of exceptions.

Another common misconception is that schools with "college" in their name don't offer much in the way of research opportunities, said Fishbein, who serves as president of the International Association for College Admission Counseling. But, for example, 65 percent of Franklin and Marshall students participate in research before they graduate, Mankus says.

Another type of school in the U.S. with "college" in its name is a community college. These are two-year schools that grant associate degrees and career-related certificates. Community colleges vary in enrollment size – some are large, despite having "college" in their name.

Some students begin their education at a community college and then transfer to a four-year college or university to complete a bachelor's degree. Many schools with "university" in their name are larger institutions that offer a variety of both undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

Public universities are some of the most sizable schools, sometimes enrolling tens of thousands of students. These schools are also highly committed to producing research. But it is a misconception that all schools with "university" in their name are big, says Chelsea Keeney, assistant director of international student recruitment at the University of Minnesota—Twin Cities.

Some are relatively small, such as Marymount California University, which had a total enrollment of 985 students in fall 2016, per U.S. News data. Also, not all universities are public. Private universities include, among many institutions, some of the Ivy League schools, like Princeton University.
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Maren’s Answer

I would not be concerned about the college designation over the university designation. When I graduated with my bachelors degree, my school was called Georgia College & State University. For whatever reason, after I graduated, the school decided to shorten the name to just be "Georgia College". I remember wondering if that would impact my opportunities, but I'm glad to say it has had no impact on an employers' interest in me. I would focus more of your attention towards what type of degree you are looking to get and what you would like to study. As well, when looking at different options, consider the schools' programs in your area of study rather than the name of the school. That will be most helpful in making the best decision for your higher education pursuit!
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Andra’s Answer

Typically the difference between them is the programs offered.

Usually, a University will also have Master's Degrees and Doctorates offered whereas a College might only have a 4-year degree. Some Colleges eventually become Universities; what you should focus on is finding a program you are interested in that fits your criteria.

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Jay’s Answer

Hi Aiden,

Typically in the United States, there's a difference between junior colleges and universities. A junior college would usually be able to provide something like an Associates Degree for 1-2 years of course work, and a university can be a 4+ year for undergraduate degrees and beyond. A 4-year school could be a private school and call itself a 'college' however it would be the same as a university.

The value for how a degree looks and what school it is from depends entirely on the employer and the job itself, however from my experience I believe most jobs do not check for the school itself but rather the type of degree and any other accolades you may have gotten during your higher education experience.
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