Skip to main content
8 answers
8
Asked 192 views Translate

describe a difficult writing task in school and what you did to complete the task

#writing #task #problem #difficult #essay #article #school #class #college # #writer #author

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

8 answers


0
Updated Translate

Chris’s Answer

Hello kelvin T!

When I was in school, I had to write a huge financial brief for a company (that I won't name for all of our sakes). It wasn't a great company in my opinion, and one that I felt didn't have an ethical business to begin with. The goal was to objectively look at its financial health, and talk about investment opportunities.

The most important thing I did was change how I was looking at the overall ask. It wasn't to say, "Would I do this?" it was to say, "Will this make someone with money to invest more money."
Shifting my perspective helped me assess the *financial health* of the company and assess the ramifications of investing. True to being my "authentic self", though, I put in a section that ethically and morally, consumers may start to be against what the company's business was, and there could be fall out.

In the end, I got a decent grade on it, and the professor liked that I threw in potential risks in the marketplace. It ended up never "tanking" as a company, which is fine, because I was able to stick to the facts and raise a concern others may have had. Being able to stay *objective and unbiased* is critical when you are working on new products, functionality, and designs. I truly think this assignment helped me out longterm in my career.
0
0
Updated Translate

Nicole’s Answer

Hi kelvin T. Thanks for your interesting question.

I have certainly have had many instances where I had a difficult writing task. And I share that my response to your question is more of "an adult" response, though I will try my best to think back to my younger age :)

I can recall having to write essays. My English teacher, though I totally appreciate her now, was a pretty tough grader. Even when she gave As, she did a lot of markup (red pen) on my papers :). But, I found that my best option was to start early. Add to that, get comfortable with creating a writing outline.

For example, for many high schoolers or college students, you get some sort of syllabus? that tells you what the assignments will be in the class. When you get clarity on what the writing assignment is and when it is due, try to use those early days to jot down your ideas. I have found that jotting down your ideas, especially early ideas, can make for richer output when it is time to put your writing task together.

To me, the hard part is getting the first couple of sentences/paragraphs on the paper (or typed ;)). After that, spend a little time editing, updating, adding. I have also found that in the early stages, it can be better to have too much and then spend time taking out what you don't need. In my opinion, trying to find things to add a few days before the writing task is due can lead to unnecessary stress.

I suspect that once you continue this practice of starting as early as you can, updating your writing task and...reading it aloud to yourself, you will find that these practices will make it a bit easer to get through difficult writing tasks.

Hope you find this response helpful and happy writing!
0
0
Updated Translate

Jill’s Answer

When I was in high school - some time ago - and had to write my first term paper, we were taught to use an index card method. Essentially, you would write a single point or fact on an index card and add any reference information you might need for attribution. Once you had all your cards ready, you can put them in a logical order. At that point, I found the writing to be relatively easy. You just needed to string all the info on the cards together and add an introduction and conclusion.

This sounds easier than it actually is, but it one approach that might help.
0
0
Updated Translate

Madisyn’s Answer

In college, I had to write a 100+ page paper analyzing a company of my choice. It required multiple sections of research as well a my opinions on all of those sections. It was difficult for me due to the volume of work that it required. Not only did I have to write the paper, I had to sit through hours of editing and ensuring that it was formatted correctly to the teacher's instructions.

To approach this paper in the best way possible, I started as soon as I got the instructions. This way I had time to ask questions along the way and write a small amount of the paper each day until I was finished. I cannot imagine what it would have been like to write all 100+ pages in just one week. Additionally, starting early allowed me to have a lot of time to revise and format my work. I scored pretty well on that paper and I believe it was mostly due to the time management of it all and asking questions of my professor.
0
0
Updated Translate

Glenn’s Answer

When i was in college, 30 some years ago, writing seemed so much easier than it does today. I used to find that sitting down and writing out an outline of what I was planning to cover in the particular paper. I was also told that, if you wrote in your voice, don't try to be someone else. Writing should be an extension of you speaking. The paper should be a conversation with your reader, whomever they be.
0
0
Updated Translate

Natalie’s Answer

In high school I remember having to write a few essays that were challenging for me. A habit I always had was coming up with a certain idea and structure for the essay and then not letting myself think outside of that box, which usually led to me getting stuck. If something's not working don't force it, try a new approach. It's also really important to give yourself enough time to write. That way you can take breaks when you need to and come back to it later. A lot of times I would come back to a paper I was working on and realize I could write a sentence or a paragraph in a much better way than I did before.
0
0
Updated Translate

Holly’s Answer

Give yourself enough time so you can rework it and revise as necessary...or chuck it and start over.

Reworks, revisions, and/or shifting the focus are what make the difference between a "first draft" and a good product. I have had several difficult assignments over the years, whether it was due to research requirements, my interest (or lack of) in a particular assignment, or all the other things that can interrupt the creative flow. Find the time to write that works best for you, and then give yourself enough of it.
0
0
Updated Translate

Dan’s Answer

I was not very good in High School with writing tasks. In college, I did ok but the writing experience was limited (I was an engineering student). When I started my first job, I had to write a paper for my boss that described a product we were manufacturing. My first draft was not very good but a co-worker worked with me to improve the document. Working with her allowed me to better understand sentence structure, grammer, and how to write meaningful text. About the same time, I started teaching an electronics class which did not require much writing but I did have to write lab instructions which I revised each semester. I was also required to write weekly status reports for my full-time job. Together, the repeated revisions and regular attempts (experience) allowed me to improve. I am a lot better now but it did take regular practice.

Today, you have good spelling and grammar checkers which do a pretty decent job guiding you to better writing. Microsoft Word has one built-in and you can also use a free grammar checker which you can find by Googling "free grammar checkers".

Dan recommends the following next steps:

Ask someone else to review and comment on your writing.
Always use a spell and grammar checker on your writing - such as you will find on Microsoft Word.
Find reasons to write and always try to improve. Don't give up or skip over the review and cleanup of your first drafts.
You will take writing classes in high school and college. If you pay attention and try, you will get better over time.
0