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I am trying to switch careers into marketing but haven't been having a lot of success job searching and interviewing. How would you advice i go about it.

I'm currently a data analyst looking to go into marketing.

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Simona’s Answer

It's good to know what interests you when it comes to switching careers. It may not be easy or quick to do but fortunately there are resources to help with that. My advice would be to:

1. Interview someone in the field: This allows you to see what is involved in transitioning to a new career. Is education or certification required? Do you need certain years of relevant experience? How can you get these needed skills for a smooth transition? Asking someone in this field can help answer those questions. It may even lead to a mentoring situation where someone in this field can mentor you through the transition process.

2. Shadow someone in the field: If you can find someone currently in the job that will let you spend some time following them and seeing how they perform the job duties you can learn real on the job tasks and get some experience to help you talk about in interviews. This allows the interviewers to see you know the lingo, have seen how things operate and put in the effort to learn the new skills needed for any new positions.

3. Find other ways to get experience: This can involve finding volunteer activities, taking on a "stretch" assignment, or offering to help some staff who perform these jobs at your current company. “Stretch assignments are temporary, internal learning gigs that simultaneously offer an employee a chance to develop new skills while helping the organization solve a real business problem.” Most commonly, stretch assignments are implemented to prepare an employee for an upcoming promotion, engage a high-performing employee, encourage skill development, or evaluate an employee’s level of interest or aptitude for another role.

Simona recommends the following next steps:

Interview staff that currently work in field
Find a mentor who works in this career
Shadow someone in this job
Take on a stretch assignment
Volunteer to get experience in this role
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A Victoria’s Answer

Consider working for yourself. You can market products online, choosing who and what you market and work your own ours. This way of marketing is growing. If you look at company websites, often down at the bottom there are links and if one says 'affiliates', it means they do pay people to market their products. Some are easier to do than others. An example of a site that does this is 2p18.com and you can check in the menu under jobs and marketing for more details.
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Angela’s Answer

Take your time! Just know that your job search isn't going to be perfect but you will see progress if you take the time to sit down, focus and use your resources. I highly recommend using LinkedIn for searches, feedback about companies and for getting in touch with recruiters. Make sure your profile is up to date and that you check it daily/consistently. LinkedIn is free and reliable. I hope this helps!
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Steve’s Answer

You can seek internal job rotation.
The internal interview should be easy compared to an external interview considering you don't have experience in marketing.
The good thing about working at the same company is you can expand your networking,
So even if you're not in the marketing role, you'll still leverage the relations you build in this role.
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Callie’s Answer

Honestly, I believe you could definitely make a switch into marketing in the form of a Marketing Analyst or a Marketing Strategist. There are several data driven roles that your previous skillset would be impressive to a hiring manager.

What I would do is look for some jobs that are interesting to you surrounding data and marketing. See what they're asking for and take some classes online for certifications to add to your resume. You will have your main bullet points about your data background and then will have a section of programs that you have taken the time to learn on your own that will be beneficial to your marketing career. Excel models (VBA), SQL, etc are wanted in these roles.

Good luck!
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Brittney’s Answer

Don't be afraid to look at remote jobs or offer your services on a freelance platform like Fiverr to help you get exposure and to build a portfolio. Since the pandemic there are so many remote marketing jobs available in comparison to when I first graduate from the University in the early 2000's.
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Yvette’s Answer

You're not far from marketing if you work in data analytics. Most data analytics MBA programs contain some marketing electives. Marketing is the activity, institutions, and methods for developing, promoting, supplying, and trading valuable offers, whereas data analytics should be a non-biased science for discovering information. Marketing is the process of identifying a product's or service's ideal clientele and bringing that product or service to their attention. Consider the following mental image:
Would you prefer to work as a data scientist for the FBI, Homeland Security, or the Police Department?
Would you prefer to work at Google, Apple, or Amazon as a marketing professional?
You can't sell jobs at the FBI, Homeland Security, or other government organizations, but you may create tools to encourage people to apply for roles like data scientists. As a result, you should be able to answer the questions regarding where you picture yourself working in the future decade. What motivates you? Do you prefer to be a classified professional who contributes considerably to a firm's or company's research in order for its professionals' aims and services to be successful, or do you prefer to work with a huge group of persons conducting PR or selling items? Whichever path you take, you'll be successful if it's where you picture yourself most happy to stay for a long time doing such a job! Best wishes!
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Tiffany’s Answer

Hi, Praise!
I used to be a data analyst and when trying to find a new company, I struggled a lot because I didn't have Tableau experience. If you have been interviewing and there are items that come up that you are not familiar with, I would recommend taking training in those areas to add it to your resume. Another thing you could do is look into jobs that are similar to your experience instead of directly with the "data analyst" title such as roles in marketing, statistics, Business Information, etc. I actually ended up becoming a Business Analyst after finding interest in Salesforce and taking their free online trails.

Good luck with your job search!
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Megan’s Answer

Hi Priase,

Congratulations on your new search! It is courageous to reevaluate your career path and more important to find passion in your day job. The good news is that data analysis is a highly valuable skill within marketing. Yes, there are many creative aspects to marketing, but we cannot make those creative decisions without first looking at the data to support it.
My advice to you would to be proactive and open to your manager about wanting more exposure to marketing. He/She/They may be aware of projects that are happening in the company that you can lend a hand on.
My second piece of advice is around networking and mentorship. Marketing is a large umbrella term and there are many roles within it. Try and network with different people in marketing to get an idea of what teams you might be interested in. Once you find a team that excites you, try and find a mentor you can meet with on a regular basis.
My third piece of advice is to get creative with your exposure. Marketing experience does not have to come just from your day job. Does your company have employee resource groups? If yes, you can get involved and help run their social media presence. Are you passionate about non-profits? If yes, volunteer your time to help a cause with their branding. There are many outlets to get marketing experience, don't limit yourself.

All the best, I believe in you!
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Mark’s Answer

I would suggest researching companies that you are interested in. Create a LinkedIn profile as that is a great networking platform for you to research jobs, people who work there . Also go on Glassdoor to see what current employees are saying about a company and how they interview candidates. How a company treats a candidate is a great indicator on how they will treat you as an employee. There are also many resource tools about interviewing, tips and tricks to use. Be confident in your approach

Job Hunting Tip # 1 – How to use LinkedIn
LinkedIn can be a powerful tool in your job search efforts if it is used well. It can be used to network with people of a similar background, to share information or to apply for a new role. However, be thoughtful and strategic when you wish to connect with someone. Do not just click connect and hope they accept. Review someone's profile carefully, understand their background and what they do. In the note field, state why you wish to connect. When you give a reason, you are showing respect for someone's experience and time, and you are making not just a connection but starting a potential new professional relationship.
It will be more powerful, more robust, and useful if you think before you connect. Your LinkedIn profile is your "Professional Brand" - Make it count!
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