Skip to main content
4 answers
6
Asked 335 views

In cognitive behavioral therapy is there a "best" way to go bout approaching people's mental health conditions?

I don't want to ever approach a patient in the wrong way and end up hurting them in some way, I know every situation is different but generally how should I go about talking to my patients

Thank you comment icon I love this question! You are very caring to be so concerned for the people you will work with in this field. Thanks for using CV! Alexandra Carpenter, Admin

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tricia’s Answer

Your kindness is evident, and that compassion will already be the prominent factor in helping. Always. But, going about it? Sit, time, and questions that portray authentic interest in their perspective - not to solve the problem but to try to understand how they see it. Whether you do or not, they will be working through the problem by verbalizing the different ways of looking at it - with no wrong answers - because it’s how they see it.

Thank you for asking such a caring question. You make my heart sing.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tiona’s Answer

The experience of perceiving that you are understood by another human being produces structural and neurochemical changes in the brain. Dr. Dan Siegel describes this as the “feeling of Feeling felt.” Therapy is as much about the technical approach as it is the therapeutic alliance that you build with clients. Self awareness and understanding your own biases, potential blindspots, and areas of emotional wounding make you more available to be a safe space for processing patients’ emotional experiences. That is one of your most powerful tools as a clinician.

Tiona recommends the following next steps:

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Racheal’s Answer

Hello. Every clinican is trained to follow the guidelines of ethics and legal practices for treating clients using any theoretical orientation.
CBT is a specialized treatment and there are schools throughout the US that allows for certification for that practices to hone in on the art of CBT, just like DBzt and EMDR.
Specifically related to your question, it's valuable to ask yourself what are you trying to achieve when using CBT for the specific issue? Does CBT align with the goal and objectives with the client. If you feel that there is an issues, just stop using the theory, you may also need to consult to possibly refer tye client out.
Hope this helps.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Priya’s Answer

Hi Sanaa,
Unfortunately I do not think there is a "best" overarching technique. It is really determined person by person. As you study, you will be exposed to many exercises and get a chance to try them. Then you will be able to pick from your toolkit which exercise works best. You cannot use a wrench for every project--it depends on what you are building or assembling that requires particular tools, right? Once you learn and gain experience it will come more naturally which tool works best in what kind of situation. And its okay to make mistakes. You are human after all. Building a good relationship is the first step and key step in helping someone therapeutically--everything else will come later. Also consult your clinical supervisor at that time and apologize when needed!
0