Skip to main content
4 answers
6
Updated 816 views

What is it like to be a licensed professional counselor (LPC) or a licensed marriage and family therapist (LMFT)?

What is it like to be a licensed professional counselor (LPC)? Any advice on the career? Is it a rewarding job? Do you get burnout from hearing other people's problems?

Thank you comment icon I am not a certified counselor but I have been volunteering with crisis hotline. The program teaches you how to be a crisis counselor and then you will implement what you have learned. You have to commit 4hrs a week and it has been very interesting. I have learned so much! This volunteer work might be helpful in determining if you like counseling people. Bailey BSN, RN

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

mark’s Answer

Hi Missy,

Wow, that is quite a question!! Being a LMHC is a very rewarding, stimulating, and at times exhausting profession. It can leave you feeling elated sometimes, while at others you may feel dejected and disappointed. The main thing I like about this line of work is that it is Human. I feel that I can be of value to people in need, and that some people will improve as a result of our interactions. I highly recommend it for people who genuinely care for others and are willing to deal with setbacks if they occur.

It is very important to have balance in your life in order to avoid potential burnout. Self-care is essential to leading the best life you can have as both a professional and human being living an enriching personal life. Commitment to clients and self are equally important aspects of being an effective therapist. You will only burn out if you allow yourself to become overly caught up in the lives of your clients- boundaries are essential and must be clear.

I've loved my career as a counselor/therapist. My main complaints are on the business end of the work- Dealing with insurance companies, keeping your financial books, billing, etc. are sometimes drudgery, but hiring out some or all of this work is a way to make it less problematic.

I hope this helps answer some of your questions. Take care and choose wisely. Most importantly, follow your heart!

Mark V.

mark recommends the following next steps:

Read books and articles about other peoples' experiences as therapists/ counselors.
Seek face- to- face meetings with people who might be willing to talk with you about their experiences and thoughts.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ebony’s Answer, CareerVillage.org Team

I am currently a Trainee MFT/PCC. I've listed both since I am pursuing both, at the moment. As a Trainee, I schedule and see clients as my calendar allows but I need to finish school before I am an Associate. Once I am an Associate I can begin accruing hours to become licensed.

Even as a student burnout is real but it also presents an opportunity for us to know our limits and take time for ourselves. As a result, when I start to feel overwhelmed I can clear my calendar and take some time for myself to ensure I can sharp and attentive for my clients. During that time it means I need to take self-care seriously and do the things we usually take for granted. Go for walks, pray/meditate, eat healthy meals, surround myself with a healthy support system.

Before I started I thought my biggest challenge would be the ability to leave work at work. However, as time progresses that becomes easier depending on the cases/clients. Your training will prepare you a great deal for what you can anticipate. Of course, every once in a while life and clients will through you a curve ball but keeps the job interesting.

Hopefully, this helps.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Annette’s Answer

Personal or group counseling is extremely rewarding and there are many settings in which a licensed counselor can work - such as primary school if trained as a guidance counselor K-12 - or a nonprofit or community services agency - or in higher education combining personal counseling with career counseling. And there are many specialty paths and training such as family and marriage counseling, substance-abuse counseling, mental health counseling and the like, Training and experience help mitigate burnout, but many in non-proft areas find short-staffing can negatvely affect their ability to do the best job they can. Professional counselors can also work in profit-making organizations as in human resources and even outplacement counseling for people who have lost their jobs.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Bright’s Answer

A licensed Professional Counsellor is a certified person by law to provide psychological treatment to their client. Their job is to ensure their client is mentally and emotionally and spiritually sound. This profession is equivalent to the role of a medical doctor in the well-being of their patients. Being a certified Professional is a good career choice because its focus is to bring wellness to humanity mentally, emotionally and psychologically as well the human race at large.
0