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How much programming do you need to learn to do software programming?

So I can know how much i need to be doing

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Dhiraj’s Answer

While programming is essential, the most important part is understanding and learning how to solve problems. Programming is a tool that helps you achieve that task. There are many resources online like YouTube, Coursera, Learning.org that have sufficient amount of information to learn the basics of programming.

Each programming language might have its own nuances, but the fundamentals required to solve the problem are more-or-less the same. Focusing on the fundamentals will be more beneficial.
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Fred’s Answer

The answer to that is "more". I've been a professional developer for over 20 years, and I'm still learning. New technologies, new languages, new ideas...There is always more to learn. Most (not all) shops these days will expect you to have a bachelors degree in computer science.

Also, there is more to being a programmer than knowing the syntax of a language. Each language has common idioms used that other programmers will expect. Knowing good coding style, what libraries exist, how to debug and test, how to document...the list goes on. And being a programmer also requires the ability to communicate - orally and written. You have to be able to write specs that others can understand. You have to be able to explain to both technical and non-technical people how stuff works.
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Jenelle’s Answer

As Fred said, there's always more to learn. There won't be a point where you know "enough". Start with something you'd like to accomplish and then break it into smaller parts. (Your initial goal will probably be much too complex to do right away.) Start building it a little at a time - your first implementation will have a lot of issues, but you will learn from the issues. This will help you learn "enough to be dangerous". Participating in open source projects will also help you improve and learn to collaborate and accept feedback.
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Tony’s Answer

Start with "Hello world!" program that is the minimum amount to complete the entire programming process. Then build up from that. When I was learning programming on my own over one summer, I would come up with an idea, and program it by the end of the day. For example, a simple Tic-Tac-Toe program to play as computer opponent. This took me about 400 lines of code, and I got it done in one day.

Think of all the programs you use, and mimic them. For example, the program that runs a vending machine. Or the program that runs your ATM machine. Or, the program that let's you program your VCR or DVR machine. Write simple games. Write a program that does "Word Processing" like Microsoft Word. Write programs that generate math curves based on a given formula. Write a website with a database. Write a program that calculates payroll taxes. The possibilities are endless.
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