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In a application for a computer-science related position which area of my resume should be the strongest?

I am applying for a computer-science position and wanted to know if I could improve my resume for certain positions.

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Atul’s Answer

Always customize the resume based on the job description of the opening where you are applying.
For instance: if you are applying to a financial institution- name specific projects/programs that you have written. Also name the computer languages that they are looking for in the resume. If they are looking for a Python language and if you only mention Java, the software program that screens the resume will discard your resume right away.
Your GPA in the computer related courses makes a difference. If your Cum GPA is 3.0 but in the computer related courses it is 3.9 - it matters and it is important to mention it.
Please be aware resume will only get you in a door and now most employers will ask you take their test (up to 3 hours) where you have to write code snippets or show results.
List your summary and accomplishments if you have any in the front of the resume. Relevancy is very important.
It may be time consuming to customize the resume for each position you apply but keep in mind you want only one job.
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Miguel’s Answer

I hired a lot of Engineers in my career (+100); put first your areas of expertise; you can list technologies, then focus on your achievements and explain what you did do to reach them, including how did you use those mentioned technologies, those were the most critical points.

Include languages you speak/read/write.

Then, you can list your experience, and lastly education
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Marika’s Answer

Your resume should reflect your level of experience that aligns to the job description you are applying for. If you don't have relevant experience yet, then describe aligned projects you have participated in to show your level of competency. If you are still in school, then highlight the programming languages you are studying. If you are taking any specific certifications, then highlight them and your expected end date of completion.
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Mikki’s Answer

I'm a senior software engineer and have conducted many interviews for varying levels of software positions. As I don't do the screenings with the resumes, I can't answer much to that point but I'd say as far as earlier career engineering goes, we're mostly looking for what kinds of projects you've worked on. As a Java shop, we'll look at your listed languages to see if we spot any "sister" languages that can easily translate over into relevant experience.

Honestly-- we put far more weight into our take-home exercise than what's on your resume. A lot of advice will say to prioritize the languages listed on the job listing, but while that may help get you through the recruiter screen, you're really setting yourself up for failure when you speak to the engineers. If you apply for a Java position and most of your experience is in C#, but you say most of your experience is in Java, when your Java is not up to snuff that's going to be a red flag for us. Whereas if you were upfront about your experience, we'd be able to see which skills would translate how best to help mentor you were you to join our team.

Programming languages evolve so often that honestly we just wanna know you can code and learn the ways of our own codebase.

I can only speak for what my own team looks for, granted, but yeah honestly just focus on projects and skill sets you've worked on and the engineering team will figure out the rest. Just be upfront and best of luck!
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