Skip to main content
3 answers
3
Asked 602 views

How do you became a NFL front office Member like General Manager or a recruiter ?

NFL team front office like a General manager or Recruiter for a team.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

3

3 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brandon’s Answer

Look for schools that offer sports administration or sports journalism. From what I have seen many of the staff at sports programs are ex players of college or NFL teams. Also look for internships and youth programs that NFL teams offer. Although for the most part many of the staff that work for the NFL are ex players with B.A.s in business administration or specifically sports admin of some kind. Check out WorkInSports.com and look at the job requirements for any of the positions you like. In conclusion getting a job in the NFL is similar to playing in the NFL you need to start out with first high school sports admin, then maybe that leads to a job in college admin, and maybe after all that experience you can get an NFL admin job. Also if you get an MBA in sports admin you might be able to got straight into an NFL gig.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kimberly’s Answer

In many career fields, building out a strong network is an important step in your professional growth and achieving your goals or being hired for that dream job. For the specific role you are seeking of GM or recruiter, I also recommend connecting with your local professional sports teams through volunteering. Local sports teams are usually involved in their communities and you'd likely have the opportunity to connect with people who work for those organizations. Start building out that network, crafting your personal brand and always give your best.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

David’s Answer

Hi Austin:

The general manager of an NFL team is responsible for all aspects of the club's football operation, e.g. players and coaches. This role is distinct from the executive who runs the actual business, e.g. sales and marketing, of a football team. At most clubs, the GM hires the coach and is, ultimately, responsible for the team's performance on the field, not its financial bottom line.

The GMs I knew and worked with at the NFL all came up through the player evaluation ranks. In other words, they were scouts whose job is to evaluate college-level players for NFL potential. Most of them played college football at some point, at some level. Some actually played in the NFL. Eric DeCosta of the Baltimore Ravens played D-III football at Colby College followed by a long career in player personnel at the Ravens. Mike Mayock, former GM of the Las Vegas Raiders is another example. Mayock played in briefly for the New England Patriots before moving to player evaluation and enjoying a long (and prosperous) career as a draft analyst for NFL Network.

I think the key is to get some experience while you are in college. See if you can get a role with the team—paid or unpaid—and start learning. Do pretty much whatever you are asked—as long as it's not illegal or immoral—and learn as much as you can. Learn how to evaluate talent. What to look for in players. Learn how to make cut-ups—the videos of plays used to aid in the player evaluation process. Learn the language used to describe their skill sets. Read the evaluations draft experts like Mel Kiper write; it will help you understand what to look for and how to describe what you see in a player. NFL talent evaluators have their own language and you have to learn it.

Lastly, it's a long road with few guarantees. At the bottom, a regional scout for an NFL team spends a lot of time driving between schools to evaluate college players. A lot of driving. You are away from home. A lot. And it doesn't pay much to start. But, if you enjoy the game and are willing to put in the work, it may be well worth the time and effort.

Good luck.
0