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What are some post-bachelor's programs for those who need to improve their chances for admission to post-graduate programs?

What can people do after graduating that will improve their chances of getting into med school, law school, or Master's/Ph.D. programs?

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Baljit’s Answer

After graduation look for a job in the field you in. You could also look at internships and volunteering. Most grad schools will look at those and make their decisions to see how interested you are in completing you post graduate program with them. You could also look at some other online classes from Udacity, EdX and Cousera but to name a few. You can also list these online courses on your resume that you have completed. You could also look at helpful courses for LSAT prep and MCAT prep. There are classes and books on it (Amazon has a collection of them).
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Chirayu’s Answer

There are several things that individuals can do after graduating to improve their chances of getting into medical school, law school, or graduate programs, such as: Gain relevant experience in the field through internships, volunteer work, or research opportunities. Maintain a high GPA, as most graduate and professional programs have a minimum GPA requirement. Obtain letters of recommendation from professors or professionals in the field. Prepare well for entrance exams such as the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Consider taking additional coursework or a post-baccalaureate program if there are any deficiencies in your academic record. Participate in extracurricular activities, community service, and leadership roles that demonstrate your dedication and commitment to the field. Research the programs you are interested in and tailor your application materials to highlight your qualifications and fit for the program.
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Fred’s Answer

Generally, your advance degree is some kind of continuation of your undergraduate degree. So if your b.a. is in math, you'd then go get your masters/phd in math.

Now, most schools do not have a "pre-med" or "pre-law" major. You can say you are one of those, but then generally pick a major in a related field. Biology is a common choice for premed, as is chemistry. Pre-law majors could be history or poly sci. However, there is no hard, fast rule saying these are the ONLY pre-med/law majors.
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David’s Answer

I used to get this question a lot when I was in grad school doing office hours with undergrads. That was a long time ago, but I don't things have changed too much. Getting a leg up in graduate school applications takes the same kind of effort that is needed to get a new job: networking and cultivating experience that could lead to success in the program. On the networking front - identify the schools/programs that you're interested in and reach out to professors and administrators. Do some intro calls, ask for coaching/guidance. But go into those conversations with a compelling story about who you are and why their guidance will be valuable. When it comes time to do applications, reach back out to those same people, tell them that you submitted an application, and express enthusiasm about the possibility of studying under them.

In terms of cultivating experience, go out and get a job, pretty much any job, and start figuring out who you are and what you value. If you're looking hard enough, any job can provide valuable insight into doing a future job. When I left my PhD program and moved to New York, my first couple full time jobs were as a line cook. The lessons and skills I learned in professional kitchens, specifically around executing on multiple priorities in high stress environments under crushing deadlines, have given me a leg up in every private sector job I've had. I talk about my line cook days in all of my interviews. That kind of life experience can go into a really good application essay. And good essays will set you apart from other applicants.
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Bridget’s Answer

Getting employed post-bachelors can increase your chances of getting admitted into a post-graduate program. If you can get a job in the area of your planned career path, that would be great. It is also okay if it is an internship or temporary job. Working before pursuing graduate school has great benefits - it helps clarify your graduate school aspirations; presents you to the admission board as industrious; can set yourself up for more job opportunities after school too!

You can also reach out to the alumni network of the school(s) you are interested in, and connect with the members to guide you through the application process, funding opportunities, and career mentorship. Good luck!
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Lisa’s Answer

Good question.
Depending on your area of interest, many universities in California and nationwide offer post-graduate preparation programs mainly through their Extension department, I.e., UC, Berkeley Extension, Harvard Extension.

Some of these programs offer rigorous and recognized preparation pathways that may be accepted by the institutions you are interested in.

The first place to start is with the institution that you want to enter and see if they have an approved list of post-grad programs or classes that they will consider in the admissions process.

Note: Some schools may discourage this as an option to prepare for entry and may ask you to take more entrance exams instead, such as the LSAT + GRE, or MCAT+ GMAT, etc.

All the best.
I hope this helps!
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