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How much am i boutta get paid?

is it worth the time for collage?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Aaron’s Answer

Blake,

College can be a great experience for a young person. Although you can certainly have a great career without attending college, according to the Social Security Administration "Men with bachelor's degrees earn approximately $900,000 more in median lifetime earnings than high school graduates. Women with bachelor's degrees earn $630,000 more. Men with graduate degrees earn $1.5 million more in median lifetime earnings than high school graduates. Women with graduate degrees earn $1.1 million more." I would suggest attending your local college fair or tour to see if this is of interest to you. If college or school isn't your thing try the the local building trade associations to inquire about becoming a carpenter, electrician, millwright. Those fields are in demand and are lucrative.
Good luck to you.

Aaron recommends the following next steps:

https://www.carpenters.org/join-us/
https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/research-summaries/education-earnings.html
https://www.ceta776.org/apprenticeship/qualifications-for-apprenticeship/
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Roberto’s Answer

Blake,

Look at college as an enabler. I would say that unless you want to pursue a trade, it is always worth it if you want to get really ahead on a "white collar" type of profession. It doesn't have to be a "fancy" college. In corporate America, college still counts and it is actually a requirement for many positions. If you are thinking on getting into business yourself, college is just a great stepping stone.

Like I said, unless you want to get into the trades, where a great living can be made or some artistic expressions where talent is most important: college should be a great experience for you.

Good Luck !!!
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Autumn’s Answer

Hi Blake, there are several great recommendations above. For me, my undergrad and graduate studies helped me with discipline, creativity, perseverance, amongst many other skills that help me today as a professional. There are many ways you can obtain skills, and the path is not always a college education, however, many times that is a great place to find structure and development of who you are. I would recommend considering your interests and looking around at job sites, to get an idea of education requirements, certifications, and pay ranges in your area and fields of interest. A good site to get started at is Glassdoor.com.
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Ehab’s Answer

When you compare people who go to college vs. those who don't, studies show that on average people who go to college make a lot more money over their life than those who don't. That doesn't mean that everyone who doesn't go to college is going to be poor, you just give your self a higher probability of making a lot more money. Companies that hire college educated people are looking for people who show commitment towards a long term goal, and are results oriented because they set a goal (going to college for 4 years) and then accomplish that goal (finishing college and graduating). College also prepares people to work in groups, overcome challenges, build soft skills, as well as hard skills (computer programs, math, etc.). Just keep in mind that college is a commitment so make sure you do it when you're ready. If you are not ready for it, that's fine, get a job and consider doing it at a later date. The challenge with delaying college is that life gets in the way and could derail you. When you start earning money, even though its not going to be much without a degree (generally speaking), its hard to stop earning money at some point later and go to college. Also, you could get into a relationship and potentially have kids....all these will make it more difficult to commit to going to college at a later date.
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Wilson’s Answer

It depends on what you're trying to pursue. Some may be worth the time and money after college. You may want to do your research on what interests you and the type of job availabilities you can go for. See if it is worth it.
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Derek’s Answer

Hey Blake -

In terms of your question, college or trade school is a great option. My advice around it is to find a job that offers tuition assistance where you can work & go to school at the same time with the company paying for it. I found that having work experience while getting my masters degree was highly beneficial. Since getting that degree I am making around $60,000 more per year then I was previously AND my company paid for the entire amount it cost for me to get that degree. That was huge since no additional debt was needed. A couple great employers that pay for school and give you the flexibility of school are Nike, Starbucks and Target. These aren't glamorous jobs but to have no debt out of school is a huge way to progress your life forward after college.
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Alisha’s Answer

Blake,

College or trade schools are totally worth it. This day a degree (doesn't matter what it is in) is the equivalent to a high school diploma when employers are looking at your resume. I say that, but, if there isn't a path that excites you in college, that you can see yourself making a career out of, I highly suggest looking into some type of trade school. Trade schools can pay the same, and in some cases more than a college degree. You have to take a good, hard look at yourself and what is going to make you happy!

Good luck on choosing your path!

Alisha
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Rocio’s Answer

Hi Blake,

I second most of the answers provided above. My recommendation is to think about what interests you. What are you passionate about? And it's ok to not have those answers, as many of us did not know what we wanted to do as a career while in school. If you don't have a particular skill or field that you are interested in pursuing, I would recommend thinking about jobs that provide tuition assistance. This will offer you the opportunity to get some working experience under your belt while taking some classes to help you find your passion. Good luck!
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