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What are three important pieces of information that I should know about welding??

What does a typical day look like as a welder?

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Kris’s Answer

A typical day for a welder can vary greatly since so many different things require welds.

If you are luck enough to be employed by a major fabricator, much of your welding could be done in a climate controlled shop with plenty of space.

If you are employed in the construction field, you could end up almost anywhere. I have a staff of welders. Sometimes they are able to fabricated things like handrails or truck trailer parts in the shop. They can cleanly measure out what they need and use a desk or other flat surface. Other times, they are stuck in a basket high in the air, or working off a boat or a barge in the water. Many times, welders have to crawl into tight spaces. It is then that it is very important to have appropriate welding gear. Jackets, shoes, gloves, helmet. Sparks will fly and they will hurt.

Welding is a very satisfying career. If you have a good eye and a steady hand and take pride in your work, you will be in high demand and you will really enjoy it.
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Ariel’s Answer

“Welding” covers several different processes, and they each have their own methods and applications. It’s hard SUCH a broad question! There are entire books and semesters of study devoted to each one of these. But, to pick 3 that can cross all methods it would be: Make sure it’s clean! (Preparation is paramount.) Shielding gas can make or break your weld. Don’t touch the hot thing.

Make sure your shielding gas (or flux) is correct for your application and process. Don’t be disappointed if your first welds aren’t pretty. Just make sure they are strong with good penetration.
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Aaron’s Answer

Hello,

According to Primeweld.com "Welding is among the highest paying skilled trades in the country with a median entry-level wage of over $40,000 per year or about $20 per hour. It's also an accessible career since the requirement to begin learning the trade is usually a high school diploma (or GED)." Specialized welders such as Rig welders make up to $77,000.00 per year. Welders, however do work long hours under extreme conditions such as hot and cold weather. If you want to get into this field I would suggest enrolling in welding vocational classes in your area.

Good luck.

Aaron recommends the following next steps:

https://primeweld.com/blogs/news/10-best-jobs-for-welders-and-how-to-get-them#:~:text=Rig%20welders%20are%20some%20of,for%20these%20sought%20after%20positions.
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Jax’s Answer

It very much depends on what field you're in, as welding can be tedious or physically demanding.

On top of that, a lot of private companies may expect you to be qualified and able to handle several welding processes and being able to handle a variety of metal materials for very little pay compared to a tradesman/union position.

I work alongside welders and have a lot of respect for them. Being able to weld in any condition, in difficult places inside ship units or tanks, and having the focus to practice their craft until it's second nature.


Some things to consider:
Training opportunities by an employer.
College courses (some companies will pay/reimburse you for them).
Certifications, as there is MIG, TIG, Stick, Pulse, Aluminum, CRES, underwater, etc.

A typical day in my occupation may have a welder crawling into the tightest of spaces and welding seams upside down to comfortable, open areas on heated plates of metal (for added weld penetration and fusion).

Its a hot and bright job, the sheer amount of UV light emitted from the welding process is several times stronger than a tanning bed in mere seconds. Not only that but a welding inverter uses more electricity than a standard home uses, so there are electrical hazards as well.
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