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What are good languages to learn for working as a Computer Programmer?

At the moment, I know HTML, CSS, JAVASCRIPT, and C#, are any other languages good to know for this job?

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John’s Answer

Hello Mathias,

As a computer programmer, you need to be proficient in at least one programming language to be able to build software, develop applications, and solve problems. However, with the constantly evolving technological landscape, it can be challenging to choose which languages to focus on.
Here are some of the most in-demand programming languages you might consider learning:

Python - Python is a high-level, interpreted language that's widely used for web development, data analysis, and scientific computing. It's known for its readability, versatility, and ease of use, making it a popular choice among beginners and experienced programmers alike.

Java - Java is one of the most widely-used programming languages, particularly for building enterprise-level applications and Android mobile apps. Java is an object-oriented language that's known for its portability, security, and scalability, making it a popular choice for large-scale projects.

JavaScript - JavaScript is a popular language for front-end web development, and it's essential for creating dynamic, interactive web pages. In recent years, JavaScript has also gained popularity for server-side programming, making it a versatile choice for web development projects.

C++ - C++ is a general-purpose programming language that's widely used for system and application software, game development, and hardware drivers. It's known for its efficiency, speed, and low-level control, making it a popular choice for demanding projects.

C# - C# is a popular language for Windows desktop and mobile application development. It's known for its simplicity, scalability, and integration with other Microsoft technologies, making it a popular choice for Windows development projects.

Ultimately, the best programming language to learn depends on your specific interests, career goals, and the projects you want to work on. If you're just starting out, it's a good idea to focus on learning one language thoroughly before moving on to others. With time and experience, you can expand your skillset and become proficient in multiple programming languages.

It's worth noting that the most important factor in determining which languages to learn as a computer programmer is the type of projects you want to work on and the industries you want to work in. For example, if you want to work in web development, then JavaScript and Python might be good choices, while if you're interested in building desktop or mobile applications, then C# or Java might be more relevant. Additionally, staying up to date with the latest developments in technology and the job market can help you make informed decisions about which programming languages to learn.
Thank you comment icon This is really helpful, Thanks Mathias
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Atul’s Answer

It is not what languages you know but which languages you have built the proficiency?
You may know many languages but it matters where you want to work (industry and the languages that they desire.
In addition, learn Python and GO languages which is heavily used.
Keep in mind almost all employers will ask you take their test (3-5 hours) before they grant an interview.
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Robert’s Answer

The others are correct. Languages themselves are important to learn syntax and the basics, but long term you'll learn that syntax is a small hurdle when learning new languages. Core concepts are important. Ideas like loops, if-else, OOP, recursion, all the way up to more advanced concepts like distributed systems and parallelism translate language to language. Don't aim to be the master of one language, master the concepts and then you'll see that learning languages is much easier.

Computer Science would be my recommendation, don't learn just how to code, but why we code ways we do. Why we use certain patterns and why those patterns are better than others. Learn algorithms, sorting, searching, those are things I look for on resumes. In the end, if I'm interviewing a person, I expect them to be able to code, but if you want to stand out, prove you know more than just the syntax.
Thank you comment icon Learning about algorithms in C++ would be a great start and would give you the tools you need to eventually design your own algorithms and write your own code. There are lots of good books on algorithms! Kessler DuPont-Teevin
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Artem’s Answer

I would say it really depends on what you want to achieve. In earlier stages, if you are still studying and not looking actively for a job, it is useful to get some kind of a broad view across the board, try different languages, and understand fundamentals and different programming paradigms. Some other useful languages you haven't mentioned are Java/Kotlin, which are basically in a similar category as C#. There are also some dialects of Javascript like Typescript, which is getting more popular recently. SQL is quite important to work with databases.

Once you are ready to get more serious and think about how to find an actual job, it would be nice to browse actual job advertisements in your area, check the requirements, pick whatever you think you would enjoy, and try to make some kind of personal project in a similar area. For example, it might be a mobile app, a website, some kind of backend service, or even a tiny game prototype. When you try to build something meaningful, you would have to learn a ton of new skills and it would be really easy to present it to your future employer, e.g. post your source code on GitHub and add your profile link to your resume.
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Jaime’s Answer

It really depends on what you want to get into. If you are looking to get into Data Science or Machine Learning, Python is a great place to start. Lots of classes and courses are designed around Python. Another language to learn if you want to get into these fields is R.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Hi Mathias, thank you for your question. I am glad to hear that you would like to pursue your career as a computer programmer.
There are many different types programmers including Web, Apps, System, ERP, etc. Each of these different programming may use different programming languages, platform and their specific domain knowledge. The programming languages you have learnt is on Web platform.
To be a good programmer, in addition to know the programming languages, you have to understand the algorithm behind so that the program can use the computer effective and the program runs efficiently.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Take the computer science course the college. This can give you an overview of different kinds of programming and you can learn the computing theories behind.
2. Practice the programming languages you have learnt. E.g. you can do some small project like control a toy car, robots, etc.
3. Learn new programming languages after you familiar one.
4. Identify the programming areas you have interest. Explore any intern opportunities.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Ramesh’s Answer

Hi Mathias,
Consider getting a four year BS in Computer Science. It provides the foundation for a career in Software Development. University of Florida's Computer Science course sequence gives an idea of subjects you will master. https://catalog.ufl.edu/UGRD/colleges-schools/UGENG/CPS_BSCS/modelsemesterplantext . You will be able specialize in areas such as Data Science, Computer Vision, Security, etc. by taking relevant electives.
As it turns out UF's Programming Fundamentals courses use Java and C++. Other Schools may use C#, and C++. Data Science/Machine Learning courses tend to use Python. As preparation, deepen your problem solving/programming in a language you are comfortable with.
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João’s Answer

As other answers already stated, it really depends.

It depends on your interests first, and then you can choose the right language depending on that interests.

If you are interested in AI/Machine Learning, Python would be a good choice. If you are interested in WebSite Development or FrontEnd in general, JavaScript and its frameworks are a good choice. If your interests are more in the BackEnd side, I would say something like Java or GO because they are pretty used languages and there are a lot of products written in those languages
I would say to look at companies and fields that you think that you would like to work, and try to find which technologies they use.

Furthermore, I would advise you to not only learn programming languages, but also a bucket of other things related to the industry. Like design patterns, database systems, messaging systems and system design in general. That knowledge is really important for a software engineer and for me, they are the type of skills that will help you more progressing in your career, because a language you can learn relatively quickly after you are a professional.
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Anthony’s Answer

Hello Mathias,

That's a great question, but it really just depends on what you want to do as a programmer. It looks like you know the "Front-End" of web development, so there are a couple other tools you can add to your "toolbelt" if you want to be a web developer.

- React, is a JavaScript library that has a specific syntax but it uses JavaScript as its "base" language. It is used to build single page applications or SPA's. React is a very common and popular tool that is used today. Some good places to get some free training on React would be YouTube, and some good channels to check out are Traversy Media and Pedro Tech.

- NodeJS is a backend language that also uses JavaScript and is used to make API's and run server-side code outside of a web browser. But, it is still used in modern web development. Check out some videos by The Net Ninja on YouTube as well for some basic and free tutorials.

- Unity, while not a language is a modern game engine that uses C# to run and you can make video games for phones, computers, and consoles alike. It is free to install the base Unity engine to your computer and they have free tutorials on the interface. In my opinion it can be a little user friendly that one of the alternatives like unreal engine that uses C++ as its language.

- Additionally, since you are using JavaScript you could learn how to use some JS libraries for styling you web pages. Some common libraries would be Bootstrap, Material UI, or Tailwind. All are very commonly used in modern websites and make it easier and more approachable to style a web page and create really sleek looking components on your webpage. The Net Ninja has beginner tutorials for all three mentioned styling libraries.

It might be a good idea and in your best interest, like others have mentioned, to figure out a direction you want to go with for computer programming and then "specialize" and practice the languages that you enjoy using. Once you feel comfortable and proficient in the languages and know a lot of the in's and out's. It will be reflected in your work products and applications that you are able to make. One thing that helped me out when I was learning was coding along with a tutorial. In my experience, the more popular videos you can code along with will explain along the way and allow you to build a little muscle memory for when you run into bugs and error's in your own projects.

Another final suggestion that might be of help is learning how to use GitHub, it is free and you can host front end projects and applications on there and it is very commonly used in the web development world.

Hope this helps,

HaPpY cOdInG
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Sahak’s Answer

It all depends what kind of career you want to get into. Web development is mostly Javascript and its frameworks (React, Vue, etc) HTML and CSS.
Software development is more C++, Java, Python. Pick one and go in fully in studying those languages, create a portfolio of your projects and try to look for internships that can give you professional experience.
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