Skip to main content
8 answers
9
Asked 442 views

What is the best job?

I want to be in the medical field but I don't like high stress or blood or needles. Which job should I do?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

9

8 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Daniel’s Answer

Great question Emma!

Below are three different fields that are still medical. You may not have come across these yet but they are much needed.

1. One of my closest friends is a genetic counselor. Specifically she works at a children's hospital that helps children/parents walk through the difficult journey of understanding genetic disorders. There is such a need in this field since most of the general public have never had to walk through this before and the amount of medical data/terms is very overwhelming to many. Parents are desperately searching for answers when their child is going through this and doctors can't consult and spend enough time with each patient. That is where genetic counselors fill the gap.

2. Another medical field I would consider would be a patient care advocate. These are individuals (sometimes registered nurses) who help patients navigate their care when going through cancer, transplants, major surgery etc. They also assist with navigating the sometimes complicated field of medical insurance and help answer insurance questions from the patient. This field is a major need in our society as baby boomers became older and insurance becomes more complicated.

3. Lastly, with the rise of covid and other viruses/diseases that are popping up around the globe we need more infections disease doctors. I spoke to a few at the height of covid and they were all working 7 days a week because of the lack of professionals in this field. Even before covid there was a lack of infections disease doctors and this staffing shortage has casued a ripple effect that will only get worse as new diseases pop up around the world and more tenured doctors retire. The patients who have these diseases are usually some of the most sick and they need specific knowledge and extra care from these doctors.

Wherever you go to school I would ensure they have a robust medical program that assists placing their students in the field they desire. Whatever field you decide to go into will be a big help in the medical industry.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! I haven’t thought of those jobs. I’ll definitely look into them! Emma
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tania’s Answer

Hi, Emma!
Cool question! I was thinking the same 18 years ago and my decision was to study Industrial Engineering in the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid... :) The times have evolved and now, you have 'Biomedical Engineering'. Being an Engineer provides you wide skills to be applied in different fields...Also, being an Engineer you can change easy to different sectors...
I have been working as a trainee in medical instrumentation and control and it was awesome! You are close to the Doctors and Patients but your ownership is to set-up a medical technology, a medical device and to understand what they need! Designign new medical devices is big enough as designing a plane! There are lot of investigations and it is amazing all you can learn and apply for helping the medicine to use instruments and machines! The social wellbeing has a strong relation to the medicine and the technology!
All the Best in your decision!

Tania recommends the following next steps:

Check: https://www.upm.es/Estudiantes/Estudios_Titulaciones/EstudiosOficialesGrado/ArticulosRelacionados?fmt=detail&prefmt=articulo&id=551d88ff1da0f210VgnVCM10000009c7648a____
Check: https://www.uc3m.es/grado/biomedica
Check: https://www.uam.es/uam/biomedica
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Christine’s Answer

This is a difficult question to answer, because what’s best for you can only be determined by you. I encourage you to explore (google it, talk to people in various parts of the medical field, talk to a counselor or adviser) and gather lots of information. What’s available and right for you will find you.
Ask about schooling too. To be a nurse in the US you have to do clinical which is rotational at different places to help you get experience and exposure. This can be rather stressful but is worth going through so you can get to where you want to be.

Christine recommends the following next steps:

For starters: look for office jobs (rather than in a hospital or clinic) like a primary care or family doctor.
I encourage you to explore (google it, talk to people in various parts of the medical field, talk to a counselor or adviser) and gather lots of information.
Ask about schooling too
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Emma
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Patti’s Answer

Ultrasound tech get paid just as well as nurses and I don't think here is an blood or needles involves. Physical Therapist or physical therapist assistant, occupational therapist, social worker in a healthcare setting, or pharmacy tech. Radiology tech might have to do IVs for contrast, but I'm not 100% on that.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Vilash’s Answer

Being a doctor can be a lot of responsibility but it can make you feel that you have a purpose helping humanity. I love helping people with mental illness holistically as I feel it is such a disability experience. I enjoy not just pushing meds but understanding what is driving their illness. I feel sometimes like a detective. For me I have always curious about people and why they do what they do so I’m a strongly therapy oriented psychiatrist that also does alternative medicine. I am starting my own private practice. I love helping people improve the direction of their life. Each field of medicine has different stress and demands. It’s all preference and interest.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mary’s Answer

If you are interested in the medical field but do not like high stress, blood, or needles, becoming a medical laboratory scientist may be a good career choice for you. Medical laboratory scientists, also known as medical technologists, work in clinical laboratories analyzing patient specimens, such as blood, urine, tissue, and other body fluids, to help diagnose and treat diseases. Some of the reasons why becoming a medical laboratory scientist may be a good job choice for you include:

Low-stress environment: Unlike some other medical careers, such as surgeons or emergency room doctors, medical laboratory scientists typically work in a low-stress environment. They are not directly responsible for patient care, and their work is often done behind the scenes in the laboratory.

No direct patient contact: If you do not like blood or needles, you will be happy to know that medical laboratory scientists do not have direct patient contact. They work with patient specimens that have already been collected and processed by other healthcare professionals.

Opportunity for specialization: Medical laboratory science offers many opportunities for specialization, so you can find an area of focus that interests you. This can include areas such as hematology, microbiology, chemistry, immunology, and molecular diagnostics.

Strong job outlook: Medical laboratory science is a growing field, with a strong job outlook and competitive salaries.

To become a medical laboratory scientist, you typically need a bachelor's degree in medical laboratory science or a related field, which includes coursework in biology, chemistry, and other sciences. After completing your degree, you must pass a certification exam, such as the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Board of Certification exam, to become certified and eligible to work as a medical laboratory scientist.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Nandini’s Answer

Hello Emma,

Yours is a very loaded question and has the potential to start heated discussions :) The answer to your question is very personal and will vary for each person. As a tech consultant, my answer is that my job is the best! I love what I do, I had plenty of opportunities to travel which i took advantage of (pre COVID), meeting new people, working on projects that I am passionate about. To help you find your "best job", I would like you to step a step back and think about the following:

1. What are you fields of interests? I would go back to a year or two and think about what still interests you. Whatever you choose for your college, you will be stuck studying that subject for a couple years - so I would pick something that you are genuinely interested in
2. Do you envision a future in that field - Take a reality check. Do you see yourself getting a job in your field of interest and supporting yourself and your family with that income?
3. Affordability - Are there good colleges that can offer your field of study with affordable tuition?
4. Lastly, talk to some of your teachers and guidance counselors. Sometimes, they see things that we don't and might have more options for you.

Hope my answers help you out. Have a great rest of your day!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for your answer! I will definitely apply this as I look into careers. Emma
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brianna’s Answer

Hi, Emma.

I think you'd be hard pressed to find a job in the medical field that isn't at least occasionally stressful. That's just the nature of working in a field where you're dealing with people. It's a good idea to think about what is stressful to you personally when looking into jobs. I know people who love fast paced work environments and get stressed out when there's not enough to do, for example. With that in mind, here are a few medical jobs that don't involve blood or needles:

- medical coder or billing
- insurance specialist
- administration and scheduling
- medical scribe
- patient care manager
- data analytics
- physical therapy
- occupational therapy
- speech therapy
- medical social worker
- in home caregiver
- researcher
Thank you comment icon Thank you! I’ll definitely take these into consideration! Emma
0