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How hard is college?

How hard is college?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Paul’s Answer

In my opinion we make college about as hard as we decide it to be.

When I went into college I pretty much knew what I wanted to do and what my strengths and limitations were, in regards to my academics and courses.

I decided to not listen to others regarding what they thought I should pursue in regards to a major or career. Doing what others wanted, and going off on another course that was not my own, is what made college hard.

Being able to utilize the college resources, library, accessing tutoring and educational assistance, and knowing where things were on campus helped alleviate the difficulties.

Some students may have a lot of skills in academics, but I saw many students, who had lesser abilities, who developed skills of campus navigation, and study skills and other abilities to access resources, who went on to achieve amazing things.

So, many people might initially think it is hard, but this mindset can be eliminated over time, when a student develops the skills to use campus resources to their academic benefit.
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david’s Answer

“Hard’ is a relative term, and I encourage you to ignore it. Think back on where you are now and from where you came. Sixth grade was harder than fifth, and twelfth grade harder by far. But, realistically, both were equal. Each year you built on what you previously learned. So, is college hard? No more than 12th was harder than 11th. Your challenge is that you are fully accountable for your participation. No one calls your parents if you skip class. No one calls you after class for doing poor work. No one tells you when to study. Schedule a normal load of classes during first semester and commit to dedicated study hours - and also commit to some social hours. Doing both ensures that you find a balance. A strong benefit that many students never discover is that, at college, you have direct access to instructors and are encouraged to seek them out for personal discussions on assignments. You’ve done well so far; you will continue success as you go forward. All the best to you.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for the question. I realize many high school student may have the anxiety before entering the college.
In fact, from my experience, the college days one of my precious and happiest time in my life. You should enjoy the college days.
Below are my suggestions to prepare entering the college:
1. Join the orientation events organized by the college
2. Walkthrough around the campus if possible to have yourself familiar with the campus facilities
3. Review the syllabus to prepare
4. Speak to students in some senior years to understand their college life
5. Explore the extra curriculum activities and join the clubs/society you have interest
6. If you will stay in hall, you can start socialize with you hall mates
Enjoy your college life! Hope this helps! Good Luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Alicia
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Joe’s Answer

There are many factors that affect the answer to this question
1) Your own perception of what is hard or easy which is affected by your aptitude and preferences for subject matter to study
If you like something or are enthused about it..it's possible that it won't look as "hard" for you ..because your level of interest and effort will be high
If you don't like something, you may think it's hard because the level of interest and effort your're putting in is less.
So in short - how hard or easy something is subjective

2) There is an objective part of this answer...sure there will be some courses that generally require more effort to study and do well in
Quantum Physics is probably harder than a basic course in economics or history....but also because the level of pre requisites is much greater for the former vs the latter. In general terms, but not absolute by any means...STEM courses are more difficult/harder and require more work and study that liberal arts courses.

So decide what you like and what aptitudes you have (have done well in school before) and then chose a major that you are likely to excel in and find not as "hard".

In addition consider the following factors when deciding on a college and/or major
1) Cost vs value - not every college degree is worth the cost and none (undergraduate) in my opinion are worth going into debt for.
2) What will you do after you graduate??....not everyone is going to be teaching or go for a PHD...or even go to graduate school for a masters degree. So will you be job market ready after graduation if you don't go to graduate or professional school??
3) If you do decide to go for a higher degree..how will you finance that? Will you go to work for some time and save money and then come back..or will you borrow money (not recommended unless you get into Harvard Law or Medical or a few of the elite professional schools)

Links:
https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/choosing-a-major-in-college-what-to-know
https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/plan-for-college/find-your-dream-college/choosing-right-major-for-you


Good Luck
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Alicia
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Aisha’s Answer

Hello Alicia,

College classes are typically harder than high school classes because the course work, topics, and depth of materials are more complex, set at a faster pace, and require more studying. As long as you put your best foot forward, stay motivated and study hard, college will seem like a breeze.

Good Luck.
Aisha T.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Alicia
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Lindsey’s Answer

In my opinion college is as difficult as you make it out to be and it all depends on how you respond to the hardships. Not every class will be easy and they shouldn't be. We all need to be challenged so we can learn how to deal with the challenges in an intelligent way.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Alicia
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Dr. Joseph’s Answer

College is EASY!

What is HARD is staying on track and completing all your work on time!

This means that you have to start creating boundaries with friends and schedules. Please keep in mind that you are here to learn and give yourself some grace. You don't know what you don't know! But, what differentiates you from others is the time you invest in yourself to learn and practice!

I am now finishing my 5th degree and the hardest part was making sure that I have a strict schedule with myself. You have to really map out all your assignments, including actually doing the reading, then put your thoughts on paper many times. Once you start doing this on a routine, you pick up so much speed! I now can do 20-50 page papers in a matter of hours! Think about it, cover page, intro, body, conclusion, references... It is a lot of wash, rinse, and repeat! Once you get the structure down, you can become so strong at writing that you start to enjoy it! Then, you start to publish and contribute to the broader body of work that you are going after!

Dr. Joseph recommends the following next steps:

Learn about creating a schedule
Practice staying on schedule
Estimate hours to the schedule
Track actual hours to the schedule
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Chirayu’s Answer

The level of difficulty in college can vary depending on many factors, including the student's academic background, the major or course of study, and the specific college or university they attend. College coursework is generally more challenging than high school coursework, and students are expected to be more independent in their learning and time management. This can require a greater level of self-discipline and organization than what may have been necessary in high school. College courses may also cover more complex material and require critical thinking and problem-solving skills. However, college can also be a rewarding and enriching experience, with opportunities for personal and intellectual growth, social connections, and career development. It's important to remember that everyone's college experience is different, and some students may find certain courses or subjects more challenging than others. If you do decide to attend college, it's important to seek out resources and support systems such as academic advising, tutoring, and study groups to help you navigate any difficulties you may encounter.
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