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What can I do with a degree psychology ?

I'm thinking of majoring in psychology when I get into college. But, I don't know what jobs I could get with a psychology degree other than a psychiatrist. What jobs can I get with a psychology degree, maybe jobs involving more criminal psychology?

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Delaina’s Answer

With a psychology degree, you have the freedom to explore numerous fields based on the type of degree you obtain. For instance, industrial psychology opens doors to various exciting opportunities in HR or other executive fields! Imagine kickstarting your career as a project manager, workforce analyst, or behavioral analyst focused on HR-related tasks. Remember, psychology is a vital asset in any industry involving interpersonal relationships and people management. To expand your knowledge and uncover even more amazing opportunities, I highly recommend checking out Psychology Today. Embrace your psychology degree, and let your passion guide you to a fulfilling and incredible career path!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. Patty
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Joseph’s Answer

A psychology degree can open up a world of exciting and diverse career opportunities for you! With this degree, you can make a significant impact in fields such as human resources, marketing, sales, business, healthcare, and education, just to name a few. The possibilities are vast, and the skills you develop as a psychology graduate will be highly valued in various industries. Your future is full of potential, and with a psychology degree, you can create a fulfilling and rewarding career path tailored to your interests and goals. So go ahead, seize the day and embark on this exciting journey!
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Britni’s Answer

Hi, there are many possible jobs for those who pursue a degree in psychology. Some include working as a psychologist, counselor, working in human resources, business administration, behavior analyst, etc.!
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Rafeh’s Answer

You have endless possibilities ahead of you! Becoming a psychologist or opening up your own business are fantastic options where you can make a significant impact on the lives of others. Remember, your potential is limitless, and any profession that helps people will bring you great satisfaction. Take a moment to do a quick job search online using the keyword "psychologist" – you'll be amazed to see the exciting opportunities awaiting you. Keep your head held high and believe in yourself, as your future is undoubtedly filled with success and positivity!
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Jennifer’s Answer

Hi Bella! A degree in psychology on criminal justice side can open doors for you to jobs like jury selection, Supervision Officer, working in the juvenile detention center, jobs in CPS, employment with a police department to partner with them on hostage and/barricade situations.
Depending on what field of psychology you choose will determine the doors that will be opened for you. You got this!
Thank you comment icon Add focus on forensics . That will enable you to prison rehabilitation, jail, mental health evaluation for sentencing. Juvenile crimes and crisis intervention. Field is constantly evolving. Best of luck Marie Enos MSN, BSN, RN-NIC
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Amalya’s Answer

With a psychology degree, you can have various career paths. Almost in any field, there is a necessity of psychological analysis and advice: Educational psychology, fashion psychology, legal, medical, social, analytical psychology, and many more.
You also can conduct private sessions (both online and in-person) as an advisor.
Best wishes
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Kelly’s Answer

There is many different areas you’re able to use your degree. Although you can further your education an become a psychologist or psychiatrist. However, you can practice as a counselor (various fields), behavioral health therapist or tech. There are many avenues to help you with this field of interest. I have two degrees in psychology- and I work in the educational field as well. I have experience working within the behavioral health field as well. Any work preferences psychology is a plus especially learning about the culture of your environment and community also how to analyze behaviors around you and in the workplace.
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Deborah’s Answer

There are many good responses to your question. Just to be clear, a psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialization in psychology, particularly something like neuropsych or some other capacity which involves the biological side of how our minds work. As a psychologist, there are indeed many opportunities, which are well described in other responses. I'd like to add that the journey to becoming a psychologist positions you to be a huge contribution to humanity. This requires having the ability to empathize with people of all backgrounds, stages and ages. As a psychologist, you will have a particular responsibility to guide people towards their path to wellness. You will have to know yourself well, which is, of course, a life-long journey for each human being. As a forensic psychologist, if you work in the courtrooms, you will be present to how social systems impact human beings, and can have many complex opportunities to serve others. It will be important for you to know just how empathic you are, how to develop ways to avoid vicarious trauma without disengaging from clients, etc. Are you more empirical in your nature and comprehension of human systems, human beings? Are you more humanistic? Look these up or ask more questions to have some way to reflect on these questions. Are you more academic or hands on? Are you an idealist, realist, an agent of change or have some other relationship with the outside world? And what do each of these terms mean to you? In my opinion, the study of psychology involves self awareness, compassion, empathy, the ability to manage many complex and co-occurring understandings of the mind all at once. It will be important to realize that despite the effort to have terms mean the same thing to all psychologists, this is not possible, so listening to each others' reference points is vital. Discovering your theoretical framework will be important as well. All of this and more will be part of your complex journey towards becoming a psychologist, regardless of how you express that in your work. It's a challenging and very rewarding profession, with many ways to contribute. I wish you the best and if you have any further questions, please feel free to ask.
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Sabrina’s Answer

Hi, if you are thinking of going into a more healthcare based role keep in mind a bachelors in psych will get you jobs such as counselor or social worker roles. If you are looking to do psychiatry (main difference being the ability to administer medicine to patients) you would have to go to your MD which then I would recommend Biology as it will prep you for the MCAT better and you are always able to do a psych minor. However it seems you would like to take a more criminal psych route. There are degree paths out there that specifically are bachelors in forensic psychology and you can go to become a forensic psychologist in the long term. Im going to link an article that would highlight that whole path for you. I would also recommend lots and lots of psych based volunteering in your undergraduate, it will put you ahead of other candidates in the long run. To be a forensic psychologist you also need to get your doctorate or PhD but the cool thing about that is almost all graduate Phd programs will pay for your schooling, pay you on top of that and even a lot of the times pay for health insurance. If you did just the undergrad in forensic psych however you would still have good opportunities out of school like lab technician and analyst jobs. Hope this helps.
https://careersinpsychology.org/becoming-a-forensic-psychologist/
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lillie’s Answer

Hi Bella! Psychology is a diverse major that can lead you down numerous career paths. Although we do think of psychiatry as the main career path, there are plenty of others that don't involve getting a doctorate. In psych, there are 3 categories that you can go into; academics, research, and practice. Academics simply means teaching it at a high school or collegiate level like school psychology (school counselor, social worker). Research-based psychology careers could include forensic psychology, developmental psych (study of birth to death), neuroscience, and cognitive (thinking, memory, perception). Some of the concentrations at my University involving practice are Industrial-Organizational psychology (motivation in the workplace or human resources), mental health (if you want to be a practitioner you must get a masters in clinical psychology), and applied behavior (create intervention plans with patients with autism or persons with different developmental needs).

There are plenty of opportunities in the psychology field and there are always concentrations that will surprise you. My advice is to take a career path in psychology class to learn more about various careers and take classes that spark your interest and go from there. It is completely okay to switch majors or change paths, as long as it fits your goals in life.

lillie recommends the following next steps:

Career Paths in Psychology
Ask professors, advisors or other professionals about any questions you have.
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December’s Answer

Hi Bella- you've gotten some great advice already. I am a school Psychologist. In my career, I do so many things. I test children and young adults for school based disabilities (special education). I write behavior plans, and determine when students are a risk to themselves or a threat to others. I do some counseling too. Being a school Psychologist means that you work a school schedule with summer, winter, spring breaks. It means you get benefits and retirement. And last, when there are budget cuts in the school, you offer so many supports, you're highly needed, well paid and last to get cut.
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