Skip to main content
9 answers
9
Asked 753 views

What are the best college majors to choose?

What are the best college majors to choose?I want it to be able to benefit it me in the future. I mean that I don’t want to major in math only to never use that skill.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

9

9 answers


3
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

T.J.’s Answer

Hello Macy!

Some majors will provide better opportunities than others. However, there really isn't such a thing as "the best major."

For example ...

Some people could argue that engineering is the best major, because it can provide a higher salary than most fields and help pay off college debt better in the long term. However, engineering programs are tough and not for everyone.

Medicine, computer science, and other STEM fields are labeled as the best majors for similar reasons (high paying potential). However, there's always cons.

They're are cons for social science, humanities, arts, or business majors too.

Every major has pros and cons. One major that works for one person will not work for another person.

What is most important to keep in mind is:
- What you get out of a degree is what you put into it.
- Having a degree does not mean you'll know everything.

Regardless of your degree, you will need relevant work experience. Your major will teach you theories and concepts, but it may not show you how to apply those topics to real life tasks.

Even though we view college as the way to get a job, it's often not enough by itself. This is true whether you major in Art or Mathematics. You'll need more experience outside of your degree. That's why it's important to get internships, develop hard skills/soft skills, and network.

Determine what matters the most to you.
- Money & financial stability?
- Passion & fulfillment?
- Meaning & making a difference?
Keep in mind: You can choose to focus on one of these things, or all three (you don't need to choose only one).

Spend time exploring your values, goals, and interests. Then, you can select a major that reflects what you want + need out of life.
Once you select a major, aim to get real world experience any way you can.

Sending you support as you explore your future :)
Thank you comment icon Thank you, T.J.! Macy
Thank you comment icon You're welcome! T.J. Worthy
3
2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Cristina’s Answer

Hi, Macy! This is a difficult question to answer since there are so many options to choose from. As Adrian said, a business degree can potentially open many doors for your future. Really and truly, the best majors could be the ones that interest you. There’s no point in dong something for the rest of your life and being miserable only because it pays a good salary. Start researching now to see which majors sound interesting to you. The good thing is, you have your first year of college and the university’s counselors to help guide you through which path to take, so don’t feel too pressured to make such a big decision.

One piece of advice I can offer is to consider the subjects you’ve taken in school. Does attending a particular class or learning a certain subject make you excited to work on assignments or projects? Taking electives can also help you explore fun and different classes that interest you. Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Cristina, thank you! Macy
Thank you comment icon You are most welcome! Cristina Fore
2
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Alex’s Answer

Think about majoring in a subject that interests you but make sure to take core business and finance courses so you understand how the economy works
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kyra’s Answer

My answer is always go with a career that you will make you happy! Explore what your interests are and find a career that allows you to stretch your skills as well as learn something new! Right now your top grossing fields from a salary standpoint are tech, medical and dental.. all of the essential fields that we as a society are always going to need. Keep in mind job security as you do your search as well! Money is great but security and benefits with a company is even BETTER!
Thank you comment icon I am really grateful you took the time to answer this question. Macy
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Renea’s Answer

All of the majors are good but you have to know how to work them! I think the best majors are nursing, teaching where you will never be without work! Some majors need the upper credentials like a master's degree to find a good job but nursing and teaching is good right off the bat, but most jobs will be Monday thru Friday!

Godspeed,

Renea
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Daysha’s Answer

Hey Macy, a communications degree can be incredibly advantageous for a multitude of reasons. With a strong foundation in various aspects of communication, you will find that you possess a valuable and versatile skill set that can be applied to numerous job industries. Graduates of communications programs typically have careers in mass media, public relations, and marketing, where they can put their knowledge of message creation, persuasion, target audience identification, and strategic planning to good use.

In addition to these traditional industries, a communications degree can also help you excel in various other fields that heavily rely on effective communication skills. For example, in the world of advertising, you would be responsible for crafting compelling messages to promote products or services, while in politics, your ability to articulate ideas and garner support would be critical. Furthermore, the ever-evolving technology sector requires professionals who can efficiently communicate the advantages and applications of their products to diverse target audiences.

The field of healthcare also provides a wealth of opportunities for communications professionals, as effective communication is crucial for patient education, community outreach, and public health campaigns. Medical facilities rely on skilled communicators to draft informative materials for patients and create promotional content for services, facilities, and research initiatives.

Moreover, you can choose to work in specialized positions such as corporate communications, event planning, human resources, or social media management. Regardless of the chosen career path, your expertise in crafting effective messages, understanding audience behavior, and continuously adapting your communication tactics to better engage with your target demographic will serve as invaluable assets.

With a communications degree, the variety of career paths available to you is immense. By developing your interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills, analytical abilities, and creative problem-solving capabilities, you will be well-equipped to thrive in any industry you choose. Essentially, strong communications skills will always be in demand, and your degree will provide a solid stepping-stone to numerous opportunities in the professional world.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mary’s Answer

One thing to be aware of is that many job postings are more of a guideline than a requirement. Even when it says something like "Computer science degree required or equivalent" it's more important that any college degree exists at all and/or you've had 10-20 years having experience in your field without a college degree. Example, I have a film degree but my career is in computer science. My degree sure didn't get me the IT job but it got me an administrative job that lead me into a computer science career path.

That said, my advice is to stay away from humanities. History, religion, anthropology, sociology, etc...all of those are fascinating subjects that generally get touched on during general education requirements but those degrees are too broad for a "qualification" unless you're going the PhD route or directly into social work or administration. In contrast, a degree in math, computer science, business, marketing, etc. DO have a more specific marketable skills that people are looking and asking for.

Go with what you enjoy most and get there by the cheapest route possible in terms of college selection. The bigger and best schools don't really matter and often even don't have the best teachers or connections. I went to one of the top schools in the nation and most of my professors were forgettable, mediocre, or even bad. Only a few were shining instructors that I think back on fondly. My spouse on the other hand went to community college then transferred to a top 10 university. The best instructors were at the community college.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Mary for the advice. Macy
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Adrian’s Answer

That's a great question! It can be quite tricky to decide, as it really depends on what you're passionate about. However, going for Business as a major is quite an awesome choice, as it offers such a wide range of options and can be used in virtually any field. So, you might wanna consider that! 😊
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Macy
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Christina’s Answer

The best major is the one that fits you best. Have you done any personality tests? Try Meyers Briggs or something similar. Talk to a trusted counselor or advisor and they will get you on a path to tests like these for you. When I'm mentoring entry level employees I tell them to go to 16personalities.com for a start. This will be a good start to really find out more about you. A wise person once told me a job that you love will always pay in the best way. If you do the same with your major, you'll love learning and eventually a job in a field for that major.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Christina Macy
Thank you comment icon Good answer Christina. Your answer I feel is true. Renea Gott
0