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How do I know which college is best for me?

I'm not entirely sure what I want to do for my future but I'm leaning towards film and/or fashion. Though, I'd really like to go to an Ivy League.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Tara T’s Answer

Ivy League College with a Fashion Program

I discovered that Cornell University, an Ivy League College in Ithaca, NY, offers a fashion program. To learn more about it, you can visit this link: https://ivy-league-colleges.com/fashion#schools. I also recommend exploring the career fields you're interested in and identifying the courses necessary to achieve your objectives. Choose a profession that you're truly passionate about.

Next, research colleges that provide those courses and examine the reviews on the course, as well as the hiring rate after graduation. To refine your search, consider factors such as housing, commuting, tuition, grants, scholarships, student loans, and other expenses. Keep in mind that college is an investment in your future, so take the time to research, discuss with a career counselor, family members, or friends.

Ultimately, ensure that the career you select is one you can envision yourself in and see potential for growth as you progress in that industry.
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Fernando’s Answer

It primarily comes down to what you're looking to study and how the curriculums they offer line up with it. The other factors to always keep in mind are the cost of studying, location, quality of the degree program on offer and post graduate aid.
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A. Michelle’s Answer

Begin by reflecting on your potential career path, interests, likes, dislikes, and preferences. Which professions or majors excite you the most? Would you rather attend a small, medium, or large school; in an urban, suburban, or rural environment; as a residential or commuter student; or at a two-year or four-year institution? These are just a handful of factors to think about. Furthermore, contemplate how you'll fund your education at your chosen school. If you'll be financing your studies, explore the scholarship opportunities offered by various schools or consider more budget-friendly alternatives, such as community college. Ivy League institutions offer fantastic opportunities, but there are numerous other schools with higher acceptance rates and lower costs that also provide excellent opportunities.

A. Michelle recommends the following next steps:

Make a list of your career interests, likes and preferences. Then research a few colleges and see which are ones you should consider researching more or not a fit based on your interests, preferences and needs.-
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Marshall’s Answer

To add to the good advice of: Make a list of your passions, things that interest you, hobbies you have, things you enjoy doing, things you are curious about and talk to people that do those things if you can.

There are also lots of free "career assessment" tools out there. You basically take a "test" that ask you questions, will analyze your personality and skills and suggest career paths that you may be a good fit for. This can be helpful since you may not even know if that is something that exists in the world. Once you have those job titles, you can look at jobs out there and what kind of degree the companies are looking for on the job posting (it will say something like "degree in XXXXX or equivliant years in the XXXX industry.

Once you know what field you may want to look into, you can then search colleges that specialize in that. A career counselor can help, but you can also look things up online.

Another thing to consider, (my sister did this) is if you are unsure what you want to do but plan to go to a college is to enroll in a state school as Pre Med - all Pre Med credits are transferable worldwide for undergrad. The first 2 years you take some basics, such as math, philo etc and you spend a lot of your time taking a class in things that interest you or you are curious about. You need the core classes anyway for most degrees/schools and once you find that "thing" that is for you, you can then transfer to a school that specializes (if the state school doesn't have a program already).

https://www.google.com/search?q=career+assessment+test&sxsrf=APwXEdeqw-gaF90LZ3ZtNs-qufV-NBYSGQ%3A1687959663386&ei=bzicZMaJF-SqptQP0LSo2A4&oq=carrear+assesment&gs_lcp=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-SAQQ2LjExmAEAoAEBwAEByAEI2gEGCAEQARgU&sclient=gws-wiz-serp
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