6 answers

Describe a difficult task you were faced with and how you addressed it.

Updated Richmond, Virginia

6 answers

M. Lavern’s Answer

Updated
Every office has that one person that come to work early and leave late, being a detail person has it perks and not so much.. . When you become that go to person better known as the trouble shooter their is a way to stay a head. When you working for several managers in a department you can get stress out with all the different demands coming your way. I was chosen to finish a project at the end of the deadline, which was measure in hours down to the last seconds. Don't lose it, just have a plan. Most of the time if this is not your project from the start you can play hero at this point saving the day. Always be positive in your approach..To manage your tasks effectively, I highly recommend you try a program, such as outlook or any mail services you are comfortable with using. (study all the tips and tricks to get you by faster). When a request come across your desk write an email to yourself (It will serve as a back up of their request) and then you can schedule for time and task time to be completed or when the issue should be address with that person. Make a folder for all the managers are clients, put all commutations receive from that person in there folder and your responses in case you need reference information. Save and never delete ( you may run into another project in the future that follow the same guidelines Set task time for your self. what you do in the morning, noon, and closed of day task. schedule those task you did not finish to be the first on your to do list for the next day. If you have a difficult task or project divide it or break it down in the equal parts. Label each part ABC and write notes in your email under that project. For example, I have a week to this get this done. Monday work on Part A, Tuesday B etc. The notes you took summarize the notes to add icing the cake and present it with the finish project as a cover letter. If you are projects in parts you can still get your routine work in so that you want fall behind working in part limit you time on one project such as an hour a day so you will be refresh for the new part. Hang in there. Good luck

Jennifer’s Answer

Updated Boston, Massachusetts
Dear Quiana, A recent difficult situation and choice that I made was to go back to school for a graduate certificate while working full time at a demanding job. I'll be honest, it is not easy, but it is worth it. I'd say the best way that I have handled this is by staying calm...taking breaks and meditating has helped tremendously. Also, not multi-tasking, but giving my 100% full attention to each task whether it be work related, school related, or personal. Be creative....for example, if I've had to hand in a paper, asking my boss for some flexibility during the day and catching up on work at night. Lastly, asking for help and not trying to make everything perfect - asking my husband to do the grocery shopping and make dinner once in a while. Not worrying if my house is clean, etc. I hope that this is helpful - all the best of luck to you!

Kim’s Answer

Updated San Antonio, Texas
Quiana, That sounds like an interview question! They are trying to figure out how you think, your problem-solving skills, ability to act without direction (not having to ask the supervisor what to do), your resourcefulness, etc. For example: I was assigned to plan an aircraft disaster exercise. I had never assisted in planning one before, nor had I ever attended one, now I was supposed to take the lead! Panic!!!! First: make sure I understood what my manager wanted me to include in this exercise (a lunch for the participants, etc) Second: talk to those who had planned the ones in the previous years! Third: get organized: make lists, spreadsheets, etc. prioritize my work, based on timelines. Fourth: get some help. Select people to assist, based on my knowledge of their skills, and recommendations of others (having the right people on a team is essential to success!) Fifth: delegate, monitor, follow-up check in occasionally with my manager, etc. etc. Another example: I worked at the airport. At about 4:30 am, construction workers cut the power to half the terminal, knocking out the security alarm system. We needed to get the terminal opened up so the morning flights could take off, but could not allow people access to the fire escapes, due to the alarms not working. We (the police) did not have enough people to guard all the fire escapes. So, I asked the maintenance foreman if I could use his custodians to guard the doors. He said okay. All flights got out on time, with no breach of security. (I like this example because it shows that I get along with others - he did not have to lend me his crew!) So basically, when answering these questions, take the STAR approach: What was the SITUATION What TASK did you need to accomplish What ACTION did you take What was the RESULT I hope this helps! Kim

Andres’s Answer

Updated

Initially I had a fear of public speaking. I forced myself to volunteer for projects that gave me cause to publically speak. Initially I worked with peers and close friends, then worked my way up by volunteering for other projects. Eventually I facilitated huddles for senior leadership at my site.

Wendy’s Answer

Updated Boston, Massachusetts
With Customer Service, communication is key to success. Focus in on the core issues that the client is looking to get assistance with and follow through until the matter is resolved. If possible, track and trend for management the core issues (use analytics to understand what might be some of the main issues you are handling); I hope this is helpful. Good Luck!

Jenise’s Answer

Updated

A difficult task that I am faced with regularly is telling the customer no.  However, even if the answer is no, if you explain to the customer the rationale for the decision in a way that they can understand, oftentimes the thoughtfulness and logic will be appreciated.