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What should I major in in order to be prepared for nursing school and simultaneously complete the prereqs for nursing school as well?

I'm in 12th grade and interested in becoming a nurse, but most of the universities I want to go to say that to enter the BSN program you have to have certain credits that I can only attain by attending university in my first two years. During those first two years what should I major in to prepare me for nursing school and to help me complete those prerequisites? I was thinking biology, but I'm not too sure?

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Char’s Answer

Hi Ameerah,
It depends on if you want to complete everything at one college versus multiple colleges.

If you want to start and end at the same college, many have a "pre-nursing" major, which is designed to prepare you for entry into the nursing program at that specific college. There's a roadmap of pre-requisite and general courses that you would need to both enter the nursing program and complete your degree.

If you want to go to a university but start at a junior college (one that has an ADN nursing program), you might could just major in "pre-nursing" or "nursing" but make sure you check if there are any pre-reqs that are missing from the University's pre-req list, and take those courses separately.

If you want to start at a junior college that does NOT have an ADN program, you may have to major in something very general like "liberal sciences." Since these courses won't be tailored for nursing specifically, just make sure that they will be accepted by the university you plan to transfer to.

I started at a private university where I would take my pre-reqs there then transfer to their sister university to start the nursing program. I finished all my pre-reqs at the 1st university. Unfortunately I couldn't transfer because I realized I couldn't afford the sister college tuition. I planned to start a nursing program at a public university instead but I was missing some of their pre-reqs. I had to transfer to a junior college first, major in liberal studies, complete those pre-reqs, then transfer to the public university where I finally finished (7- year process).

Learn from my mistake and speak to a counselor at the university you want to ultimately get your BSN degree from. Tell them your plans. Although things may change, it's just better to be prepared. I wish you the best!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for replying, all of this is such helpful information!! Ameerah
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Christina’s Answer

Hello Ameerah,
I think the best way to figure that out is to look at the pre-requisites for the BSN then look at which major allows you to take those classes during your first 2 years. I started at UC Davis in a totally different major (International Relations) before realizing I wanted to go into nursing. At UC Davis (at that time) the Anthropology major provided the most courses I needed to get into the BSN program and I transferred to a BSN program after one year. You could also go to a Junior College for the pre-requisites and transfer in later.

Probably the best way to figure it out though is to ask to speak with a counselor in the BSN program you would like to attend. They will give you course and work experience suggestions to give you the best chances for getting in.

Good luck.
Thank you comment icon All of your advice is so helpful, thank you so much!! Ameerah
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Alicia’s Answer

You have the freedom to initially choose a broad field like health science, and there's no rush to settle on a specific major in your first year. It's a smart move to complete some prerequisite coursework first. And remember, it's absolutely crucial to apply to multiple nursing schools. The competition can be stiff, so having a backup plan is a good strategy. If you don't get into a program on your first try, you might have to wait a whole year to reapply. Most programs start in the fall, so plan accordingly. This advice isn't meant to doubt your capabilities, but rather to maximize your chances of success and reduce risks. I believe in you and wish you all the best. Nursing can be an incredibly rewarding career!
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