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Pro and Cons of being a Nurse

What are the different nursing jobs? What are the "best" nursing jobs?
#nursing #nurse #nurse-practitioner #registered-nurses #nursing-education


Some of the different type of nursing jobs include: Aesthetic/cosmetic, Ambulatory care nurses , Burn care, Camp nurses, Cardiac Care, Cardiac Catheterization Lab , Nurse case managers, Charge nurses, Chief Nursing Officers (CNOs), Dermatology, Domestic Violence, and ER or ‘Emergency Room’, The highest and "best" nursing jobs include: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, Director of Nursing Education, General nurse practitioner, Certified nurse midwife, Family nurse practitioner, and Psychiatric nurse practitioner. Alins A.

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Kathy’s Answer

I agree with the answers already given. One of the wonderful advantages of the nursing profession is the variety of fields and specialties. Always start with what you know you love and as you progress through your training, you will be introduced to most if not all areas nurses work in. Another approach would be to answer these questions about yourself and then match your answers to the areas of nursing that are the best fit for you:
1. Do I prefer to work on my own or with a group of people?
2. Do I prefer to be a leader of other people or not?
If you prefer to work on your own and not lead others, you might consider an area that lets you work more independently. Examples would be a public health nurse, quality assurance, nurse practitioner, or nurse researcher.
If you prefer to work with a group of people but not be in charge, you might consider being part of a team of nurses in a hospital or clinic.
If you'd prefer to work on your own and also lead others, you might be interested in being a nursing administrator with duties that do not include a lot of daily contact with others.
And if you'd like to work with a group and be a hands-on leader, you might enjoy being a charge nurse.
Going back to starting with what you already know you love, you can find a more customized fit using the questions above. Let's say you know you want to work with children. If you are a solo type, you could become a school nurse, a pediatric nurse practitioner, or do nursing research in the area of pediatrics. If you are a collaborative, team-oriented person, you could work in pediatrics in a hospital or clinic. If being in charge of a group of people appeals to you, you could be the charge nurse or head nurse of a pediatric program. Or start your own pediatrics program.
Some reality checks: You do not have to know what you want to do before you start your training or even by the time you graduate. You can try lots of different jobs in nursing to help you find one you love. You have to have a bachelor's degree and 2 years of general experience before entering a specialty training program. You also cannot start out in a leadership position, but there are many opportunities in general nursing to assume leadership duties. Finally, you want to pick an area you can make a good enough salary in to support yourself and your family. Almost any of the jobs mentioned above will provide you with that. Unfortunately, nursing education will not. Most instructors are hired as part time staff to teach one or two classes, with a one semester contract and have to reapply to teach each semester. Best wishes to you as you make your way!

Thank you! I noticed you are an NP which I aspire to be one day. I have a few questions if you don't mind. 1. I want to work in psych as an NP but heard that it can be dangerous, is there a way I only work with kids in psych? 2. What is the process of moving from one state to another (Florida to Pennsalviyan or North Carolina) ? 3. Do you get any bonus pay? Maria E.

You're welcome! 1. Yes, there are safe psych settings, including with kids. Consider doing volunteer work in a mental health clinic to explore this and related fields - and add to your nursing school application. 2. Each state has its own licensure. At least 6 mos. before you plan to move, contact the nrsg board to obtain requirements and necessary forms. Now all online? 3. If you plan to move to a state with a nursing shortage, the facilities that have the vacancies may include a bonus or moving allowance to entice nurses to apply. The US Public Health Service offers loan repayment assistance. If you mean do nurses and NPs routinely receive bonuses, I think this only happens when you are working in a private practice and have bosses that give all employees bonuses. Kathy Frederick Louv

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Mary Beth’s Answer

The ‘best’ nursing job is one that you enjoy doing on a daily basis. That can range from multiple kinds of hospital nursing, clinic nursing, home health nursing, community health nursing, and education. Rarely does a new nurse truly know all the joys and sorrows of any special kind of nursing, until they try it out. You will learn so much more in those first few years as a new nurse...more than you ever imagined. Your nursing education teaches you the basic to keep those you care for safe, but isn’t able to give you expertise in very area of nursing. You won’t be a fully competent nurse for several years of on the job learning and experiences. Seek out new knowledge, ask questions, challenge what doesn’t make sense to you, and always advocate for those you serve...and always keep learning. Become the best nurse you can, and you can practice nursing anywhere! Truly.

When going to work no longer brings you joy, but only dread of any other day...then it is time to move on and learn something new. Don’t get stuck in a rut. When you are an unhappy nurse, you are an unsafe nurse. There are a thousands kinds of nursing, so keep searching until you find that great fit!


Thank you! I noticed you are an DNP which I aspire to be one day. I have a few questions if you don't mind. 1. I want to work in psych as an NP but heard that it can be dangerous, is there a way I only work with kids in psych? 2. What is the process of moving from one state to another (Florida to Pennsalviyan or North Carolina)? 3. Do you get any bonus pay? Maria E.

You can specialize as a pediatric NP, DNP. You can then treat only children up to 18-19 years old. In Oregon there are psych facilities for children only, not sure of other states. You can move from state to state as an RN but must check to see if you need to apply for an RN license separately or if the states you are interested in are part of the interstate licensure agreement. Not all states participate at this time. You do earn a higher salary with a DNP. Enjoy your nursing journey, Maria! It will be full of excitement and terror at times...but worth it in the end if you truly have a passion for helping others. Mary Beth Rosenstiel, RN, DNP

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John’s Answer

Maria becoming a registered nurse requires more education than their LPN counterparts. Qualifications to become a Registered Nurse include completing a nursing degree, which is usually an associate's or bachelor's degree, and completing the National Council of State Boards of Nursing's NCLEX-RN exam.

PEDIATRIC REGISTERED NURSE
A pediatric RN assists pediatricians by assessing a patient's needs and providing initial patient care. They help families deal with a child's illness or injury and often offer information on nutrition, diet and good health habits. Pediatric RNs may work in a doctor's office, clinic or outpatient care center, immunization center or hospital. Work hours vary depending on the facility. A pediatric RN assists pediatricians by assessing a patient's needs and providing initial patient care. They help families deal with a child's illness or injury and often offer information on nutrition, diet and good health habits. Pediatric RNs may work in a doctor's office, clinic or outpatient care center, immunization center or hospital. Work hours vary depending on the facility. Job opportunities for a pediatric nurses, are expected to increase much faster than the national average through 2028, per BLS. The average Registered Nurse (RN), Pediatrics salary in the United States is $73,500 as of October 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $65,500 and $82,500. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

NEONATAL REGISTERED NURSE
Neonatal nurses are one of a newborn's primary sources of care. A neonatal nurse can work in one of three levels of hospital nurseries. Commonly employed in hospitals, neonatal registered nurses work with newborns younger than 28 days who often require special care. They may care for a spectrum of infants from healthy babies and mothers to infants in intensive care units. Neonatal nurses work directly with patients who may require the use of specialized equipment, such as incubators and ventilators. They must be able to calculate and administer proper dosages of medication, connect intravenous lines and perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The average Registered Nurse (RN), Pediatrics salary in the United States is $74,300 as of October 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $66,800 and $83,800. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession. The BLS predicts a much faster than average job growth rate of 12% for the overall nursing profession from 2018-2028.

CRITICAL CARE REGISTERED NURSE
Critical care registered nurses (RNs) specialize in caring for patients with life-threatening conditions, often in hospital intensive care units (ICUs). Many critical care nurses have completed training beyond what is needed for the the RN credential. Under the supervision of physicians, they closely monitor patients and administer medications and intensive therapies. In general, critical care nurses work with fewer patients than those who work with less acutely ill patients; however, the needs of these patients are far greater and require constant monitoring and assessment. Critical care nurses are responsible for monitoring life support equipment, attending to wounds, responding to changing patient conditions and providing advanced life support. They document all these patient interactions to give the physician an accurate picture of the patient's status. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), jobs for registered nurses should increase by 11% between 2018 and 2028. The average Critical Care Registered Nurse (RN) salary in the United States is $89,000 as of October 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $80,500 and $99,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

ADVANCED REGISTERED NURSING CAREES WITH A MASTERS DEGREE
Aside from earning a bachelor's degree, there are other advanced career options for nurses. Many nurses who've earned their bachelor's degree may go onto earn their Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), which would allow them to pursue careers like nurse practitioner, advanced practice nurse, or nurse midwife.

NURSE PRACTITIONERS
Advanced registered nurse practitioners are nurses who provide either primary or specialty care services to patients. Generally taking on many of the same responsibilities as physicians, nurse practitioners serve an important function in the healthcare system. In order to become a nurse practitioner, registered nurses (RNs) must further their education by earning at least a master's degree. Advanced registered nurse practitioners provide services similar to those of a physician. They examine patients, take medical histories, maintain patient records, identify health risk factors, prescribe medications, make referrals and otherwise treat health conditions. Their background in nursing gives them a unique approach to medical care. In general, advanced registered nurse practitioners focus more on patient wellness and disease prevention than do physicians. According to the Unites States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the demand for nurse practitioners will increase much faster than the national average through 2028. This means an excellent career direction for the right person. The average Nurse Practitioner salary in the United States is $110,500 as of October 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $102,500 and $120,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

CERTIFIED NURSE MIDWIFE
Certified nurse midwife (CNM) programs are all graduate level programs. Although these programs are designed for currently working registered nurses and other licensed medical practitioners, some programs will accept applicants who only have a bachelor's degree. Nurse midwifery coursework includes pregnancy management, high-risk pregnancy, health assessment and primary care nursing. Many programs require supervised clinical hours where students treat female patients and deliver babies. Although midwives are most commonly associated with helping pregnant women, they also care for women in general. Midwives conduct tests and screenings for women's diseases, such as cervical cancer. Midwives also educate women about preventing sexually transmitted diseases. In terms of preventative and long term care, midwives can prescribe medications, such as birth control, hormonal treatments and pain medicine. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts that nurse midwives will have a much faster than average employment growth for the 2018-2028 decade of 16%. The average Certified Nurse Midwife salary in the United States is $111,300 as of October 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $102,500 and $125,900. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

CERTIFIED REGISTERED NURSE ANESTHETIST
A nurse anesthetist must be certified as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA), which requires at least a master's degree and passing a national certification examination. A certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) is an advanced practice nurse specialist who administers anesthetics to patients, monitors patients' vital signs, and provides post-surgical care for both general and local anesthetic. CRNAs spend much of their time standing and may need to help lift and move patients. Nurse anesthetists can work in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and outpatient settings; anywhere that anesthetics are used in medicine. Those who work in hospitals or nursing homes may work in shifts that include nighttime hours. Emergency situations that require anesthesia may be stressful, and this job can be emotionally demanding. Anyone considering becoming a CRNA must think carefully about their own emotional responses to stress and how they think they will cope with potential emergencies occurring on the job. The average Certified Nurse Anesthetist salary in the United States is $187,500 as of October 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $172,300 and $204,500. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession. Nurse anesthesiologists can expect job growth of 45% between the years of 2018 and 2028, which is far faster than average.

Good Luck Maria

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Dante D’s Answer

There are no "best nursing jobs". If you love children, you can be a Pediatric Nurse. If you love working with/helping elderly people, you can be a Geriatric Nursing Assistant.

With Nursing, you must like working around people and you must have a clear understanding of patient care. These are two things you cannot run around from if you are going to pursue working in the particular career field.

FYI: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/patient-safety

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