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Anyone with a psychology degree or social work major?

What could I become or do with these majors?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Kate’s Answer

Hello Ryley!

A few years back, I accomplished my Masters in Social Work. During that period, I was juggling my full-time job at a university while attending night classes, steadily working towards my degree!

Many of my peers were aiming for conventional social work sectors like case management for various groups such as at-risk youth, veterans, homeless, addiction, and so on. I found my classes in these areas incredibly rewarding and learned a lot from my two internships that focused on outpatient therapy for individuals in the early stages of recovery from drug and alcohol abuse. However, I had a different career path in mind where I could still utilize my social work skills.

By leveraging my network, I found my niche in career services. Over the years, I've worked in diverse sectors (non-profit, higher education, edtech), always assisting people in defining their professional success and helping them achieve their goals. I apply my social work skills daily in my profession.

A social work degree opens up many opportunities and helps you develop valuable skills. I believe there isn't a single business sector that wouldn't benefit from having someone with empathy, excellent listening skills, resourcefulness, creativity, willingness to get involved, collaborative spirit, and a bit of grit :)

Wishing you nothing but success,

Kate

Kate recommends the following next steps:

Talk to people who have social work degrees and ask them what they do. Ask if you can shadow them! LinkedIn or college alumni resources can be great tools to find those folks.
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Katherine’s Answer

Look into The Townsend Institute for more info and inspiration on the kinds of things people do with degrees like that.
Thank you comment icon Hey Katherine, could you please provide the link? Gurpreet Lally, Admin
Thank you comment icon Yes, sorry! The link for the Townsend Institute is https://www.cui.edu/townsend Katherine Avery
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Victoria’s Answer

I'm in my last year of undergrad in psychology and recently learned about RBT training. It's one of very few certifications you can obtain in psychology without a degree. You'll expect to get paid $20/hr starting and may be provided with tuition reimbursement from your employer for grad school. With a bachelor's degree in Psychology, you can get your BCaBA certification ($40-$60/hr). You can work in HR, Business, Marketing, Administration, Management, etc.
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Jerome’s Answer

I have a Bachelor’s in Psychology and I leaned into classes on Group Process and Conflict Resolution. I’ve used it to support employees and to improve my leadership skills.

You can certainly use it to help people more directly, but having a BA Psych based with an MBA in Business has served me pretty well.
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Nija’s Answer

Hi Ryley,

First and foremost, I just want to say congratulations for exploring the options for majoring in psychology or social work. Both fields are very great to pursue; however, there are some slight differences. Both psychology and social work offer meaningful and impactful career options, and it's important for you to consider your personal interests, career goals, and level of education when making a decision. Both fields have their unique strengths and areas of focus. Psychology delves into understanding human behavior, thoughts, and emotions, often involving research and clinical practice. Social work, on the other hand, focuses on helping individuals and communities navigate challenges, access resources, and improve their overall well-being. Furthering your education through graduate studies can open up more opportunities and potentially lead to higher earning potential in both fields. It's important for you to carefully consider your passion, long-term goals, and financial aspects when deciding which path to pursue. Ultimately, whether you choose psychology or social work, the aim should be to contribute positively to individuals and society, helping to improve mental health, promote well-being, and address social challenges. Seeking guidance from your academic advisor and professors is a crucial step in exploring and deciding on a major. These professionals can provide valuable insights and help you make informed decisions based on your interests, strengths, and goals. Remember that exploring your options is an ongoing process. Be open to learning and gathering information from various sources to make a well-rounded decision. Your academic advisor and professors are there to support you, so don't hesitate to reach out to them with your questions and concerns.

Nija recommends the following next steps:

Reach out to your academic advisor to schedule a one-on-one appointment. This is an opportunity to discuss your interests, ask questions about the psychology and social work programs, and learn more about the curriculum, requirements, and potential career paths.
Research about the differences for both psychology and social work fields to gain a better understanding about the nature of both fields.
Conduct informational interviews with individuals that are psychologists and social workers.
Visit your professors to discuss your academic and career aspirations. They can provide insights into the content of their courses, research opportunities, and real-world applications of psychology and social work.
If possible, get involved in research projects or practical experiences related to psychology or social work. This hands-on experience can give you a better sense of what the fields entail and help you determine if they align with your passions.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Ryley
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