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How did you prepare for this career in terms of education and training? What traits of yours led to choosing this career path?

Looking for answers from more science based careers - i.e. Paramedicine, astronomy, botany, zoology, physicists.

Thank you comment icon I am still in the same process as you, but I have decided to try new opportunities and to cancel things out. Like for example trying to shadow a pediatrist and deciding after the experience that I don't want that path as a job. marion berzansky

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carmella’s Answer

I initially did not pick my career to be in management, however my experience connecting with people lead me to a career where I focus on servant leadership and helping others succeed to reach their goals. I went to college majoring in computer science and really that was what my parents wanted me to do and picked for me but I did not have the motivation and interest and eventually landed on Liberal studies major. Going to ASU taking my sociology, psychology, and communications courses helped prepare me for handling complex problems and leading people toward a goal.
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Jazhel’s Answer

I initially wanted to be a teacher and attempted that path. However, my first education course made me realize it was not for me. A sociology course, on the other hand, made me realize that I wanted to make a contribution in the field of higher education as an academic advisor. I pursued that path and earned my Bachelor’s in Sociology, Graduate Certificate in Academic Advising, and Master’s in Higher Education Administration.

For training and experience, my first job in higher ed was in the registrar’s office as an assistant and then a graduation specialist. I learned so much about records, registration, and program and graduation requirements. Currently as a career and academic advisor, I’ve learned about the different challenges that students face and how I can help them. The college I work at now trained me really well on my role which was really helpful.

I am not sure if awareness and belief are traits but they inspired me to work in higher ed. I know and believe that education is a path towards economic mobility. Although, I think the most important trait that led me to this career is empathy. When you understand other people’s circumstances like they were your own, you become motivated to advocate for and empower them. A career in education is challenging but we all encounter challenges in any career. For me, the education and training were worthwhile and my career has been fulfilling.
Thank you comment icon Thank you very much for the advice much appreciated. Vedant
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DaSabria’s Answer

Hello there,

I'm currently on a journey towards my dream career as well. My goal is to become an ultrasound sonographer, and eventually, I aspire to work in labor and delivery. As part of my preparation, I've earned my certification as a phlebotomist and I'm currently gaining experience in telemetry while I complete the prerequisites for the ultrasound program.

Exploring different sectors within the medical field has been incredibly beneficial. It's provided me with a clearer perspective about what I enjoy and what I don't, helping me make informed decisions before I dive deep into a specific career. My passion for science, bringing life to the world, and a deep-seated desire to help others were the key traits that guided me towards this career path.

I would suggest you take some time for self-reflection to identify your interests. Research your options, try out entry-level jobs in various specialties, build your network, and then confidently stride towards your chosen path. I hope this advice proves useful to you!
Thank you comment icon Thanks a lot for the advice. Vedant
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Kay’s Answer

Its funny I had no idea what to choose for a career when I was in high school but was interested in science. My mother was hounding me to choose something and was worried about paying for my collage. She basically just said to me one day "you are going to nursing school".
I attended a 3 year diploma program near where I grew up. It was difficult for me. Some classes seemed fairly easy but others like pharmacology and chemistry were not my cup of tea. I wanted to quit many times but my parents would not allow it.
I made it through and was happy in the end.
Nursing has definitely provided me with a job all these years and that was her point...you will always have a job...and..she was right.

Kay recommends the following next steps:

Take classes you are interested in and even get a part time job in that area. You will gain many insights as to what the job entails.
Thank you comment icon thanks bro Vedant
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Niha’s Answer

I didn't know what I wanted to do as I was leaving high school. I knew I wanted to help people, and I knew that I didn't have the ability to handle blood or surgery so nursing/MD was out for me. None of my hobbies or interests were particularly helpful for a job (the fine arts, writing, photography) or a college degree. I started college out as a Psychology major as it was the most versatile for me while also completing general science course credits. I thought about Pharmacy, but when I said it out loud, a friend actually laughed in my face and told me there was no way I would be happy doing that. I took it to heart and really thought about what made me happy, generally.

I learned I like to talk, about everything. I also like learning new things unrelated to my field. That led me to discovering if I was helping people, I need to help people for longer than a single session, and I needed to be able to remember them. From there, I started to look into science careers where I could 1) help people directly, 2) talk to people, and 3) learn new things. I found physical therapy, where I can put my hands on patients one on one and get to know them for weeks at a time. I would get to talk to my patients. Schooling after undergraduate was another 4 years, but I would also get a doctorate, which was something I was looking forward to.

Turns out, I made the right choice. I get to talk about medicine, but also about the book I read last week when I'm treating them, and I learn from them all the time, whether it's a professor or a 16 year old athlete! Overall, it's not about making the perfect choice. There were plenty of times I felt like I wasn't suited for the job (I'm definitely not the average race or body type this profession usually entails), but the benefits outweighed the cons for me. I chose a job that may not pay as much as I would like considering the amount of schooling I go through, but it gives me enough to be comfortable, and I get satisfaction in a lot of other ways.
Thank you comment icon thanks a lot Vedant
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Sarah’s Answer

I chose to study chemical engineering. In highschool I really enjoyed my chemistry, math, and physics courses. I talked to friends and family members who were engineers, as well as career day at my school. I researched different majors and decided I was interested in chemical engineering. I applied to schools with well ranked engineering programs.

Once in college, I enjoyed my classes. I also attended the college career fairs and was able to get internships as a chemical engineer intern. My internships helped me to see what engineering was really like, and how much I enjoyed it!

Whatever career path you are interested in, I would encourage you to seek out people doing that job/career, ask them what their typical day is like, and inquire if you could shadow them for a day. Research what it takes to get to that career, what the typical pay and benefits are, and what are the qualities that best fit that career.

Sarah recommends the following next steps:

Consider taking career aptitude tests (but don't put too much stake in them, one test can't tell you everything)
Research schools that have good programs for your perspective career
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Abu’s Answer

To prepare for a career, especially one related to a specific field or profession, you can follow these steps:

1.Self-Assessment:
- Identify your interests, strengths, and passions to help determine your career path. Consider what you enjoy doing and what aligns with your values.

2. Research Career Options:
- Explore various careers to understand their requirements, job prospects, and potential for growth.

3.Educational Path:
- Choose an educational path that aligns with your chosen career. This might involve pursuing a bachelor's degree, master's degree, certification programs, or vocational training.

4.Skill Development:
- Identify the skills required for your chosen career and work on developing them. This could include technical skills, soft skills, or specific certifications.

5. Networking:
- Build a professional network by attending industry events, joining relevant online communities, and connecting with professionals in your field.

6.Gain Experience:
- Seek internships, part-time jobs, or volunteer opportunities related to your career to gain practical experience.

7. Continual Learning:
- Stay updated with the latest industry trends and technologies by attending workshops, taking online courses, and reading relevant books and articles.

8. Create a Portfolio:
- Showcase your work and projects in a portfolio to demonstrate your skills and experience to potential employers.

9. Resume Building:
- Craft a compelling resume that highlights your qualifications, achievements, and how they align with your chosen career.

Regarding the traits that led to choosing a career path, personal traits can influence career choices, but they vary from person to person. Here are some common traits that might lead someone to pursue a particular career:

1. Passion: Having a strong interest and enthusiasm for a specific field or subject can be a powerful motivator in choosing a career.

2. Skills and Aptitude: Natural talent or acquired skills in a particular area can guide career choices.

3. Values and Beliefs: Aligning one's career with personal values and beliefs can provide a sense of purpose and fulfillment.

4. Curiosity: A desire to learn and explore new things can lead to a career in a field that constantly evolves.

5. Problem-Solving Abilities: If you enjoy solving complex problems, you might be drawn to careers that require analytical thinking.

6. Creativity: A creative mindset can drive someone toward careers in design, art, innovation, or entrepreneurship.

7. Empathy and Compassion: A strong desire to help others can lead to careers in healthcare, counseling, or social work.

It's essential to reflect on your own traits and motivations when choosing a career path. Consider what makes you happy, what you excel at, and what aligns with your long-term goals. Career decisions are highly personal and should be based on your unique qualities and aspirations.
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