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when you go into an art degree is it worth it?

I want to get an art degree, but is it going to be worth it in the long run.

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Alan’s Answer

What's "worth it" depends on your priorities and values. There are professions that an art degree can lead to: art teaching, art therapy, museum curator, illustrator, designer, etc. So it's not necessarily impractical, but if you can afford to not have to be entirely "practical," you should follow your passion, your talent and your instinct anyway.
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Emily’s Answer

If you have a passion for art, then pursuing an art degree is definitely a worthwhile endeavor!

However, it's important to contemplate what you aim to achieve with your art degree, and select a minor that complements your goals. An art degree opens up a multitude of career paths. Perhaps you're fascinated by art history and envision yourself working in a museum or in historical preservation? Or maybe you're drawn to the educational side of art and see yourself as an art teacher?

If you're more inclined towards the commercial side of art, you might be considering a career in design, such as creating logos or advertisements. Alternatively, you might be dreaming of creating and selling your own artwork through a personal business venture. Or perhaps you're captivated by the idea of working in an art gallery?

There are countless options available to you, so take some time to consider your interests and aspirations.
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Amanda’s Answer

That's a great question! Everyone has different priorities so just because they may think it's not worth it (due to pay, flexibility, job outlook, etc), you could disagree and see it in a different light! I think networking is a big factor to success especially once college comes around. Being able to connect with people of your similar background or major will be a big help when you start actively looking for jobs. Of course, at the end of the day it is up to you and whether you are satisfied. Doing light research and reaching out to art professionals for their input could also be a good way to decide if you want to pursue it. Art degrees have a variety of different occupations, so see what there is for you! If you believe in your art abilities, then stand strong behind it! c:
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Paul’s Answer

I suppose that it depends on what area of art that you go into.

Our society is very technology oriented, and this means there is a demand for technology trained art people.

This means that areas like computer animation, graphic design, computer illustrations are where all the jobs are going to be.

This means that colleges and universities are going be increasingly be emphasizing these type of programs, in order to meet the demand of the companies and corporations who need artistic technology skills.
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John’s Answer

Certainly, if you aspire to be a Designer in Various Commercial Industries, it's beneficial. Pursuing your studies in design? Then aiming for a top Design School is the ideal choice.

A Degree from a premier Design School aids you in crafting a flawless Portfolio, positioning you in front of the right audience. Beware of the numerous "For Pay Colleges" that provide Art Degrees to gifted youngsters, steer clear of them at all costs.

However, remember that creativity is essentially an entrepreneurial journey. If your dream is to be a Painter or Sculptor, it's advisable to seek a mentor. Look for someone who has achieved success in the creative industry you're aiming for, and see if they're open to mentoring you. There's a plethora of talented and successful artists who offer mentorship programs.
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Ana’s Answer

College is what you make of it! That can be said for any trade but this is specially important for art. Being a working artist is fully a self-motivated endeavour which is why in the beginning, you should work on de-romanticizing your view of what being an artist really is. Artists no longer trade art for food or drink absinthe while writing poetry in a Parisian cafe! I would ask yourself what about art interests you, what you want to achieve in the long run, how you imagine yourself making money, and how much time and energy are you willing to spend in the studio. The answers to those questions is how you will be able to decide whether or not it is worth it for you to get an art degree.
When I arrived to art school I was surprised at the wide array of answers people had for those questions. Those differences was what, at the end of the day, separated us between each other. Initially, I expected everybody to want to become a blue-chip gallery, famous artists but, for the most part, that was never the case. Some people wished to become educators, fashion designers, entrepreneurs, hold gigs to sustain their art as a hobby, work for non-profits, create urban farms, go into academia, and many of us just didn't know! There is no right or wrong answer but it is important to have clarity regarding your values, priorities, and objectives. For instance, if you are interested in commercializing your art and earning a sustainable living wage through your art practice I would consider the more industry-related art degrees such as graphic design, architectural design, animation, illustration, or art education. If you want to be an artist, sculptor, painter, or art making is simply your passion which holds spiritual or conceptual significance and you are, maybe, willing to sacrifice your economic well being for, I would choose fine arts. Consider that there are careers in the fine arts such as conservator, arts administrator, curator, or gallery attendant but those, just as any role in academia, are difficult to access straight out of college and might require you to obtain further education. That is to say that, in most cases, artists do not sustain themselves through their art. Instead, they choose to wear different hats which include having a day job and working on your art in the evening, constantly applying for residencies, shows, grants, and any sort of opportunity, and getting acquainted with rejection. As such, how passionate are you about art and how much are you willing to sacrifice for it?
However, when going into art school, do not expect to considerably improve your skills. Skills are improved in the course of years and years of practice. Four years of art school might seem like a lot but they go by in the blink of an eye so don't expect to come out drawing, or rendering 10 times better than when going in. Instead, art school will mostly teach you new skills and most importantly, will give you time and resources to experiment! The latter is the main reason why I consider art school to have been absolutely worth it for me. I went in with a very rigorous and narrow realist academic art background and art school demanded me to break away from that and step away from my comfort zone. I spent most of my time playing, experimenting with different media, trying new things, going back and forth between concepts, and broadening my appreciation for different art styles. Allow yourself to experiment, try out new things, become comfortable outside of your comfort zone, and be ready to be vulnerable when doing so. You will not succeed at everything you try out and that is okay.
There are incredible mentors in art school and it is wonderful to witness so many other creatives figuring art out. So in my personal experience, art school is worth it if you are willing to make the most out of it.
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L’s Answer

I think it depends on what you want to eventually do with your art degree. My advice is to go into a degree that will open the most doors for you and give you the best education because you will continue to change as your grow and you may find different things that you enjoy doing. From that point of view, an art degree is a very specific focus but could be very lucrative and beneficial depending on what you want to do and your passions. Is what you want to do possible without the art degree? Could you get a business degree to give you a backup career and try to go into art?
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