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How do will I know what major is perfect for me?

I know I want to work with kids I just don't know what major would give me the best experience

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Rian’s Answer

Hi Rebecca!
Many people have already said some amazing things! I just wanted to add that you could potentially try volunteering with kids, perhaps at a summer camp, to get a better idea to see if you want to work with kids full time. Not only that, while volunteering, you'll be able to talk with other colleagues who may give you a better insight about what they do, and why they do it.

Best of luck!
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Marlyce’s Answer

Hi Riley,

Rebecca has shared some great insights. Have you considered a career in the medical field, specifically working with children who are unwell? You could gain experience by observing professionals like Respiratory Therapists, Physician Assistants, Physical Therapists, Doctors, or even Speech Therapists. These are all potential career paths for you. Wishing you the best of luck!
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Erin’s Answer

The best advice that I ever got when I was in High School was to job shadow as many occupations as possible. I thought I wanted to be a dental hygienist until I spent an afternoon in a dentist's office shadowing one. Originally, I was disappointed that what I thought I wanted wasn't going to work for me, but looking back, I'm glad that I found out before I was in the middle of a dental hygiene program that I had spent countless time and money on. Before I landed on my current career, I shadowed a Physical Therapist, Prosthetist, and Occupational Therapist, a nurse, and about 10 other occupations. I'm not saying that you have to go on the wild journey that I did in order to find the career that is right for you, but it may rule out some things for you or even introduce you to something new that you didn't know existed. An additional benefit of job shadowing is getting to talk to someone who is already in the profession. If you find an occupation that you enjoy, the professional may be able to share advice as to how to be successful in their field, what schools in the area best for the job, or help you understand the steps to entering that profession.

Since you know that you want to work with kids, I would suggest making a list of all of the occupations that you think that you would enjoy that work with kids (teacher, pediatric occupational/physical/speech therapist, childcare, social worker, counselor, etc.). and maybe some that you are unsure of. From there, I would reach out to people that you know that are in these positions and ask if you would be able to shadow them for a few hours. Your school counselor, or even you family and friends may have connections as well, so make sure to utilize them! Most of the professionals that I reached out to were more than happy to have someone shadow them for the day. Once you have your list, you can work your way through and hopefully find one that's right for you.
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Alan’s Answer

Riley, I'm not sure any of us find perfection. But I, for one, did find a career working with children and highly recommend it. The most obvious choice for you would be teaching, so colleges that specialize in Education would be on the road to "perfect." It depends on how ambitious you are, what about working with children most appeals to you, and what age group seems to suit you best. If not teaching, then perhaps becoming a speech and language therapist, an art or music therapist, or a counselor or psychotherapist might fit the bill. Or you could work in child care or open up your own child care program. Do you think you'd like to work with groups of children or more one-to-one? Regardless of your choice, you're certainly going to want to take classes in child development. If, when the time comes, you're not sure, I'd recommend majoring in Education, whether Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education and/or Special Education. And I'd go to the websites of colleges you are interested in and see what their programs look like. In the meantime, you can certainly gain experience babysitting, camp counseling, volunteering in a child care program or a children's library and visiting different types of programs to get a sense of what they would be like.
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Enise’s Answer

Hello Riley,

Interests/hobbies: As a starter, you may know how this works for the future. You may your interests - and had hobbies since your childhood. Ask your younger self what were your passion, which hobbies were your favourite, how X, Y, Z… hobbies and/or interests amaze you and how would like to work on (because you will choose each of them for your career), and which was the most enjoyable hobby in your prior life?

Volunteering: Once you decided which interest is for you, you may start with volunteering. You may prepare yourself how you can do if X person tells you that you must finish the A duty, and/or do B duty for posters, update the website etc. After volunteering, you should gain your both soft and hard skills, and emotional intelligence.

Internship: As you completed your volunteering, you may apply an internship that fits your soft and hard skills more than emotional intelligence. Due to the fact, you may highly expect what it looks like, what you can do if A duty has given to you - and how you can complete the duty, how you present your project or presentation to the co-workers, and how you will do your internship. It will be challenging at first, yet you will get used to it. If not, apply for another internship for your role. Just give it a try.

Part-time/Full-time job: This is where you may feel anxious when it comes to getting a job you wanted. Interviews are essential, yet you should not be stressed or depressed before and during the interviews; because you will be less interested by interviewers. Instead, you should apply for a job which you do not hesitate to say what you will see after 5 years in yourself, for instance. If you feel depressed during and after interviews, and you do not feel well, and you may think the worst scenarios in your head, well you are not ready yet, and you should apply for an internship that suits you, which you can develop yourself, and ease your stress and/or your depression.

I hope this helps
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. I am glad to hear that you like to work with kids.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Do you have interest to be a teacher of primary / kindergarten, instructor in education center, children phycologist, kids sport coach, etc.
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school career counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers you would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Puru’s Answer

Choosing the perfect major can be a challenging and personal decision. There isn't a one-size-fits-all answer, but here are some steps and considerations to help you determine the right major for you:

1. **Self-Assessment**:
- **Interests**: Consider what subjects, topics, or activities genuinely interest and excite you. Think about what you enjoy learning about or discussing in your free time.
- **Skills and Strengths**: Reflect on your skills and strengths. What are you naturally good at? What subjects or tasks come easily to you?
- **Values and Goals**: Consider your values, principles, and long-term goals. What kind of impact do you want to make in your career and in the world?

2. **Research Majors**:
- Explore the majors offered by your college or university. Look into the course requirements, curriculum, and potential career paths associated with each major.
- Talk to academic advisors, professors, and students in various majors to gain insights into what each major entails.

3. **Take Introductory Courses**: Enroll in introductory courses in subjects that interest you but that you're uncertain about. This can give you a taste of what studying that subject is like and help you make a more informed decision.

4. **Consider Career Goals**:
- Think about your career aspirations. Some professions may require specific majors or degrees, so research the educational requirements for your desired career.
- Explore potential job opportunities and earning potential associated with different majors.

5. **Extracurricular Activities**:
- Join clubs, organizations, or internships related to your areas of interest. This hands-on experience can provide valuable insights and help you network with professionals in those fields.

6. **Talk to People**:
- Speak with professors, advisors, career counselors, and professionals in fields you're considering. They can offer guidance, share their experiences, and provide advice.

7. **Consider the Future**:
- Think about the long-term prospects of the field you're interested in. Will it still be relevant and in demand when you graduate?
- Consider how flexible the major is. Some majors open up a wide range of career opportunities, while others may be more specialized.

8. **Explore Dual Majors or Minors**: If you have multiple interests, explore the possibility of pursuing dual majors or adding a minor. This can allow you to combine different passions and skills.

9. **Follow Your Passion, But Be Practical**:
- It's important to choose a major that aligns with your passions and interests, but also consider the practical aspects like job prospects, salary potential, and work-life balance.
- Remember that many people don't end up working in a field directly related to their major, so transferable skills and adaptability are valuable.

10. **Trust Your Instincts**: Ultimately, trust your gut feeling. You should feel genuinely excited and motivated by your chosen major. It's okay to change your major if you discover it's not the right fit for you.

11. **Seek Guidance and Feedback**: Talk to friends and family members about your decision. They may offer valuable insights and perspectives.

12. **Stay Open to Change**: Keep in mind that it's okay to change your major if you find that your initial choice isn't the right fit. Many students switch majors during their college years.

Choosing the perfect major is a process of self-discovery and exploration. It's normal to have doubts and uncertainties along the way. Remember that your college experience is also a time to learn and grow, so embrace the opportunity to explore different subjects and discover your passions.
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