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How hard to get the job?

How hard is it to get a job after college with your new degree?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Starting your job hunt early gives you an edge. You have the time to research potential employers, polish your resume, and hone your interview skills. You're not in a rush, which allows you to be more selective about the jobs you apply for.

The goal isn't just to land a job, but to secure a position that aligns with your career goals and passions. Start your job search about six to nine months before graduation. This period is when most companies start looking for fresh talent to join their teams after the academic year.

During April and May of your final year at college is when you should start to apply for jobs. Prioritize your job applications both by which ones you are most interested in and by the application deadline. Make sure you give yourself enough time to put each application together and submit it.

Most applications these days are submitted online, so be sure that your resume is in a format that online screening software can read. This part of your job search is a numbers game, so don’t be shy. Apply to as many jobs as you can to increase the odds of getting a response and an interview.

Happy job hunting Chase
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Chase!

The job market can be a bit of a puzzle, right? Well, it's not a one-size-fits-all kind of situation. It can swing a lot based on what you're studying and how the job market is doing at the moment. You'll find that some areas have a lot of openings for fresh graduates, making it a breeze to land a job. On the flip side, some fields can be a bit of a challenge with a lot of competition.

Your own skills and qualifications, your knack for networking, and the general state of the economy also have a big say in how your job hunt goes.

Here are three top-notch sources you can check out for more insights:

1. Harvard Business Review
2. The Wall Street Journal
3. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Oh, and don't forget to have a look at my BIO! I've got a Nutritional Guide there that could help boost your academic performance.

Take care and God bless,
James.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Chase,

Securing employment post-college with a fresh degree can be influenced by a multitude of factors.

Sector Trends: Certain sectors might be on an upward trajectory, creating a surge in demand for fresh graduates, thus making job hunting less challenging. On the other hand, some sectors might be shrinking or facing economic challenges, resulting in limited job opportunities.

Economic Climate: The broader economic landscape can also sway the job prospects for recent graduates. During periods of economic growth, job vacancies tend to increase. Conversely, during economic recessions, job competition can intensify.

Geographical Factors: Your location or readiness to move can also affect your job search. Major cities often present a wider array of job opportunities across different sectors, but bear in mind the cost of living could be higher. Conversely, smaller towns or rural areas may have a lower cost of living but potentially fewer job opportunities in specific fields.

Competition Level: The degree of competition within your field can also influence your likelihood of securing a job. If you're up against a large pool of graduates with similar qualifications and experience, you'll need to distinguish yourself, possibly through networking, internships, or other unique strategies.

Preparation: Adequate preparation prior to entering the job market can significantly improve your chances of securing employment after college. Cultivating a robust network through internships, part-time jobs, and extracurricular activities can equip you with valuable skills and industry connections. Furthermore, a well-crafted resume and cover letter that underscore your strengths and experiences can make you more appealing to potential employers.

Accuracy Likelihood: 90%

May God bless you!
JC.
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Houcine’s Answer

The difficulty of getting a job after college with a new degree can vary based on several factors. Here are some considerations that can influence the job search process:

1. **Demand for Your Degree:**
The demand for professionals in your specific field of study plays a crucial role. Some degrees align with high-demand industries, making it easier to find job opportunities, while others may face more competition.

2. **Relevance of Skills and Experience:**
The alignment of your skills and experiences with the requirements of the job market is important. If your degree has equipped you with in-demand skills and practical experience, it can enhance your job prospects.

3. **Networking and Connections:**
Building a strong professional network can significantly impact your job search. Networking can open doors to opportunities, provide insights into the job market, and even lead to job referrals.

4. **Location and Job Market Conditions:**
The job market can vary by location and industry. Some regions may have more job opportunities in certain fields, while others may face economic challenges that impact hiring.

5. **Internships and Work Experience:**
Relevant internships and work experience gained during college can make you a more attractive candidate. Employers often value practical experience, and having a strong internship record can set you apart.

6. **Job Search Strategies:**
The effectiveness of your job search strategies, including how well you tailor your resume and cover letter, utilize online job boards, attend career fairs, and engage in networking, can influence your success.

7. **Flexibility and Adaptability:**
Being open to various job opportunities, even if they are not directly related to your major, can increase your chances of finding employment. Flexibility and adaptability are valuable qualities in a competitive job market.

8. **Economic Conditions:**
Economic conditions at the time of your graduation can impact the overall job market. Economic downturns may lead to increased competition for jobs, while periods of growth may create more opportunities.

9. **Advanced Degrees and Certifications:**
In some fields, having an advanced degree or relevant certifications can enhance your competitiveness in the job market. Evaluate whether pursuing additional education or certifications aligns with your career goals.

10. **Interview and Networking Skills:**
Strong interviewing and networking skills are crucial. Being able to effectively communicate your value, experiences, and passion for the field can make a positive impression on potential employers.

It's important to approach the job search with a realistic mindset and a proactive attitude. Begin your job search early, leverage career services offered by your college, seek guidance from mentors, and continually update your skills. The job market is dynamic, and while some individuals may face challenges, many others successfully secure positions in their chosen fields after completing their degrees.
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Laura’s Answer

Hello Chase,
What a great question! I will be honest when it comes to the job market right now, it is not great making it very hard right now to get a job after earning a college degree. Something else to put into consideration is what industry you are trying to get a job in as some industries are competitive to get into and some hiring managers want you to get some experience before applying to companies. Let me give you a little perspective to better illustrate what I mean.

I graduated in November 2021 with a Bachelor's degree in Graphic Design and Media Arts with a concentration in Web Design and while for a good year and a half, I was working on getting my portfolio book and website portfolio together, I really started buckling dowing to applying to jobs this year. I applied to about 12 entry-level graphic design jobs with maybe one or two of them being an internship, and I either heard nothing back from the hiring manager, heard back later to be told 'no' from the hiring manager, or heard back the very next day after applying to the position the day before and was told that my application was rejected. I quickly learned the career path that I am pursuing is very competitive, and you need to start freelancing for a bit before it seems a hiring manager will consider your resume for the position. As of right now, I am freelancing for local businesses and anyone else who might be interested in my graphic design services.

For you, it might differ as I said before it all depends on what type of career you want to pursue, but there are a TON of articles out there of people detailing how bad the job market is in general, and some of these people have applied to way more job postings than I did.

My best advice for you just starting in your career is if it is a career you can freelance for some time to get some experience/exposure do that first for a little while, and still apply to junior/entry-level positions when there are job positions that you want to apply to. Also, if there is anything you can keep practicing or learning something new within your field I highly recommend you do it because it is something you can add to your resume and makes you stand out when applying to places. Another piece that I want you to be aware of when applying for job postings please be aware of job scams. I was a victim of one this year, and it's one of the worst things to go through when trying to apply to places. I wish I could say I figured out it was a scam before they took any of my money, but I, unfortunately, can't. Do your research on the job posting by Googling the company that is hiring and if they have a website go there and see if you can find a career tab to see if they are truly hiring for that position. Using LinkedIn can also be helpful as you can search the hiring manager's name if there is one listed in the job posting.

I know this was A LOT of information I gave you in one response, but I hope it helps you to know where to get started and what you should focus on being a recent college graduate; best of luck in your career journey!

-Laura M.
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Racheal’s Answer

Hello,
Getting a job all depends on the type of job you apply for, what you are qualified to do, your resume and your interview. All of these factors are necessary when getting a job because it allows the employer to see who you are on paper and in person.
My question would be, how hard is it to keep a job, which I do see as sometimes harder than most people are willing to admit. Question yourself to you fit in with the culture (you can ask wihay is the culture in the interview), they typically day, if you like structure, don't waste time on a flex job, and lastly, pay what is your range and will you be open to negotiating or accept what is presented. The choice is always yours and yours alone.

Best of luck!
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