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Why is it hard to get in a class that I want?

I am a junior in high school. I want a career in psychology and before I go to college I want to take the course in school. The counselor know what I want to do but they still manage to put in in classes that I didn’t ask for. Also the class that I want to take are not full.

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Judith-Ann’s Answer

Brae, your situation sounds frustrating, indeed. I agree with Kim"s and Theodore"s answers. I'll say it differently, maybe. Since I don't know all the details regarding your desire to take psychology, I'll just give you a few suggestions for you to include in your quest: 1) Discuss with your school counselor your desire to take psychology. Ask these questions: is there a grade point requirement for this class? 2) are there prerequisites 3) is the class full? 4) is there anything I can do to get in this class? Take notes when given the answer. Be kind and considerate to your counselor. Keep a positive attitude.
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Kim’s Answer

Brae,

It might be that you are on a particular "track," requiring that you take certain courses. If so, they are trying to make sure you get your required courses. However, if Psychology will be taken as an elective, and you have some free electives available, you should be able to get it. The best thing to do is talk to the counselor. If they cannot explain why they won't give you the class, then get your parents involved.
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Theodore’s Answer

Without knowing the course, there maybe pre requisites to get in, like passing Math.

Can you give more details?
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your encouragement! Brae
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Aharon!

Let's talk about the journey to becoming a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) nurse. It's a rewarding career, but it does require a good deal of education and training. The first step on this path is earning a nursing degree. There are a few ways to do this: you could earn an associate degree in nursing (ADN), a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN), or complete a nursing diploma program.

ADN programs usually take about two to three years, while a BSN program is typically a four-year commitment. Some hospitals might prefer or require their nurses to have a BSN because it offers a wider scope of education and fosters leadership skills. If you're switching careers and already have a bachelor’s degree in a different field, there are accelerated nursing programs available.

Once you've completed your nursing education, the next step is to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). This will license you as a registered nurse (RN) and you can start gaining experience in a pediatric setting, working with critically ill children.

To specialize in PICU nursing, you'll need to build up experience in pediatric care and then seek out additional training or certification tailored to the PICU. Many hospitals have orientation programs for new nurses in the PICU, offering specialized training in caring for critically ill children.

You might also consider getting certified through organizations like the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board (PNCB) or the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN). These certifications show your dedication and expertise in pediatric critical care nursing.

As for the average pay for PICU nurses, it can vary based on factors like location, experience, and education level. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the median annual wage for registered nurses, including those in pediatric intensive care units, was $75,330 in 2020, with an hourly wage of $36.22. However, remember these are just averages and actual figures can differ based on the specific hospital, geographic location, and individual qualifications.

In a nutshell, becoming a PICU nurse requires a commitment to education and training. You'll need to earn a nursing degree, gain experience in pediatric care, and seek out specialized training or certification in pediatric critical care.

The information provided here was sourced from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), and the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board (PNCB). These sources offer reliable and current information about the educational requirements, specialization options, and average pay for PICU nurses.

Wishing you all the best on your journey!
James.
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Abigail’s Answer

Hello Brae, I strongly recommend that you stand up for your own interests. If you fulfill all the necessary prerequisites and requirements for this class, don't hesitate to discuss your intentions with your counselor, a reliable teacher, or another trusted individual. Make it clear that you're interested in this class because it aligns with your future goals. If you find that you don't meet the requirements yet, don't worry. Instead, devise a strategy to meet those requirements in the future, enabling you to join this class. Regardless of the situation, it's crucial to express your desires and reasons for wanting to join this class. Remember, advocating for yourself is key.
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