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How can I know exactly what I want to do before I get to College?

How can I know exactly what I want to do before I get to College?
I'm in 10th Grade and I'm having trouble deciding what I want to do. I have a vague idea but, it's hard to pinpoint

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

UNDECIDED — EXPLORE POSSIBILITIES
lilian if you truly have no idea what you want to study, that's okay—many university's don't require you to declare a major until your sophomore year. That gives you four semesters to play the field. Make the most of any required general education courses—choose ones that interest you. Talk to professors, advisors, department heads, and other students. Find an internship off campus. Exploring your interests will help you find your best fit major—and maybe even your ideal career.

College is a time of immense personal growth and self-discovery. As you engage with diverse academic disciplines and extracurricular activities, you'll gain a deeper understanding of their passions, interests, and strengths. It's natural for individuals to evolve over time, leading them to reconsider their initial major choices in pursuit of a more aligned and fulfilling academic path.

The modern academic landscape offers a plethora of disciplines and fields of study. As a college student you'll have the opportunity to explore subjects you've never encountered before. This exposure often sparks curiosity and a desire to delve deeper into new areas of knowledge. Changing majors can allow you to follow your intellectual curiosity and explore diverse fields that resonate with you.

The rigor of certain majors may present unexpected academic challenges. While these challenges can be daunting, they can also be opportunities for growth. If you should choose to change majors to find a better fit academically, your university recognizes that academic exploration is an integral part of the educational journey. Academic advisors, career counselors, and faculty members are available to provide guidance and support to you when considering a major change, ensuring that the process is seamless and informed.

Enjoy the journey lilian
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. Many students have similar question. Firstly, you career you have interest. The relevant subject will be your major and minor in the college.
Below are my suggestions :
1. Think about what you have interest, e.g. your hobbies, favourite subjects, etc. and identify the related careers
E.g. If you like music, would you like to be a musician, singer, musical artist, music producer, music composer, etc.
If you have interest in maths, would you like to be a banker, accountant, maths teacher, financial analyst, engineer, etc.
2. Find out more on these careers and determine what you have interest
3. Speak to someone who are working in these careers. Seek guidance from your mentor, school counsellor, your parents, etc.
4. Shortlist 1-2 careers in your would like to pursue
5. Explore the entry criteria of relevant subjects in the college
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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david’s Answer

You can't. It's that simple. There are thousands of opportunities that await you, and attempting to decide in 10th grade does not serve you well. My suggestion is to enjoy your classes, do your best, take the tough courses when there is a choice. Your goal in the final years of high school should be to increase your knowledge in broad areas to ensure a wide platform of areas to consider. I extend that advice to your first two years of college, staying uncommitted to a specific profession, broad enough to have opportunities, but narrow enough to pick a major when needed. The persons who will enjoy talking to you will by your college professors. In HS, teachers often don't have much time for personal advice, but college professors thrive on the personal contact. For now, focus on doing your best in HS. I wish you the very best.
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Avinash’s Answer

smiles warmly I completely understand the desire to have your future planned out before heading off to college. The teenage years can be filled with uncertainty, and having a clear path forward seems comforting.

empathizes At the same time, very few people truly know exactly what they want to do at that young age. Interests, passions, and career opportunities often change and evolve, especially when exposed to new ideas and experiences in college. The truth is, it's perfectly normal not to have it all figured out!

reassures My best advice is not to stress if you don't have a defined career or major choice before starting school. Instead, use your first year or two of general coursework and activities to explore subjects and clubs that intrigue you. Over time, you'll get a better sense of what you enjoy and excel at. Talking to professors, upperclassmen in potential majors, and the career counseling office can provide guidance.

encourages The purpose of college is to find your way, not to already have the map fully drawn. Remain open-minded, follow your interests, and the path will become clearer. You've got this! Just take it one step at a time.

Avinash recommends the following next steps:

Find A Career Expert
Take a Career Counselling Session
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Alan’s Answer

Lilian, welcome to the club. There are many students already in college who barely have vague ideas yet. And that's okay. One of the purposes of college is to explore possibilities. For now, start by asking yourself what your interests, hobbies, skills, experiences and values tell you about yourself and what you'd find fulfilling in your future life. There are quizzes, such as those on MyPlan.com, that can help with this narrowing down process. If you do have some idea, see if there's a class available in high school that could give you some idea of what further study would be like. Also, start looking at the websites of colleges you might be considering and see if any of the programs they offer jump out at you. Talk to your school counselor, and, when the time comes, the academic advisors of the colleges that may visit your school or you may visit. You have plenty of time. Even with pretty certain plans, some people switch in mid-stream to something else anyway. It's an important decision, and has to be taken one step at a time, as you start gaining experiences and insights into yourself.
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