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When deciding on what colleges to go to, what should take precedent- what you want to study or where the university is?

I've heard that college is about a lot more than the education aspect, that it's learning to live on your own and explore yourself as a person. Also, the majority of people end up switching majors anyway while still in college, so I'm wondering what should be weighed more: the university as a whole, with its surroundings and environment, or the education it has to offer?
#whatdoido #college #collegemajor #universities

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Katie’s Answer

I would say both are equally important. You need to decide what is important to you. Here are some simple things to help guide you in a direction! Best of luck.

Katie recommends the following next steps:

Decide on your top 2-3 study interests. It might seem odd, but I remember lots of students changing their majors.
Explore college options that support those programs of interest.
Consider pros and cons of campus locations and amenities.
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Tracey’s Answer

You should first consider what you want to study, then see what schools have good programs for your area of study. At this point you will have a range to work with and see what is close to you if you want to stay near home. The education you receive is based on how well the university supports your particular field of study. You can attend a really good school in name and popularity, but if your major isn't greatly supported at said school, then the school name really doesn't matter.
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Nicole’s Answer

Hi Grace D. I see that you posted this question a little while ago so I hope my answer to you (or others who may read this response) is still helpful.

What a great question!! In so many ways, the answer to your question boils down to what you are paying for. You are paying into college as a means to invest in yourself...in your future and in your personal/professional growth. And, practically, you are paying for a place to live, eat and hopefully a little play for a couple years. Just as with any transaction, you will get what you pay for.

I think that determining what would take precedence is based on whether you have a passion for what you want to study. Some people know from very early that they have a passion for and are good at drawing. In my case, I knew early in my high school years, that I wanted to be an engineer and that desire never waned. So in my case, because I carried around this long standing desire to become an engineer, going to a school that had a strong engineering program took (some) precedence over where the school was. I say **some** because I knew that I didn't want to be too far away from my family, though I ended up being about 600 miles away. My attitude to that was I was just a 2hr plane ride away and I had every intention of getting a job where I could get closer to my family when the time was right. Speaking of getting job, my goal was not only to get an engineering degree but to get a job that would interest me and provide me with financial stability. At this stage of my career, I am fortunate to still have both.

As for your comment about students switching majors, yes that can and does happen as individuals learn that a particular curriculum isn't what they thought it was. And that is ok. Better to learn this sooner rather than later. I will add, though, that there is the practical aspect of being able to show how the time you spent in college and it's costs have benefited you. Sometimes getting those benefits are as much about individual choices as it is about the school you went to, what you studied or where it is.

Thanks so much for this great question. Hope you find my answer helpful and best of luck to you!
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