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As a software developer What programming languages or frameworks do you find most valuable in your work, and why?

I'm in 10th grade and I'm doing a project on software developers which is a career I'm interested in going into in the IT field.

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Indranil’s Answer

Software is a very broad topic and there are different programming languages available that are better suited for different types of requirements. If you are developing web applications, you will typically use HTML, CSS and Javascript for building the front-end and typically use some framework based on Javascript. Angular.js, React.js, Vue,js etc. are quite popular. For backend services, Java has been the dominant programming language in the last 25 years or so, although Node.js which is server-side Javascript has also become very popular in the last 10 years or so. Python is also gaining in popularity in the area of web applications and is the dominant language in the areas of Analytics and AI/ML. In the Microsoft eco-system, C# and the .NET framework that are Microsoft proprietary are very popular. Golang (or Go) is also a popular language and both Docker and Kubernetes are written in Go. Two other very popular languages are C and C++ and these are popular in the area of embedded devices. So there are lots of options when it comes to programming languages and you should choose a fit for purpose language. But if you would ask me to recommend one language that your generation has to learn, it's got to be Python.
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Binh’s Answer

I definitely agree with the response above. Additionally, some of the more popular languages and frameworks for enterprise development include Java, Spring Boot, Typescript, Angular, and python.
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Nancy’s Answer

Programming languages are like different kinds of utensils, each with its own special purpose and unique abilities. Most of them were born out of a need to solve a specific type of issue.
Currently, I'm in the business of making tasks easier through automation, using a handy tool called Jenkins.
When it comes to Jenkins, the preferred language is Groovy, which is essentially a more user-friendly version of Java.

Both Groovy and Jenkins are true lifesavers, freeing developers from the monotony of repetitive tasks and letting us concentrate on cracking the tough problems.
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Damon’s Answer

I would personally recommend Javascript for its flexibility. You can create both the backend (NodeJS) and frontend (ReactJs, Angular, Vue, etc.) of a web application, all with Javascript. All websites utilize Javascript in several ways, and you can even create native mobile applications utilizing React Native.
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Eric’s Answer

There are some great responses here already, but I'd like to add a couple of ideas that apply to all software development.

Programming languages are always created to solve a problem that can't easily be solved with the languages that already exist. That means whenever you start out to do some kind of work with software, there may be several languages that can do it. Which one is best? The one you already know that makes the job easiest to solve.

At first, you may only know one or two languages. That makes the choice pretty easy. But if you're like most software developers, you'll rarely stop with knowing only one or two languages. In my 30+ years writing software, I've learned around 10 different programming languages. Some I haven't used in years now, because I learned a better way to solve problems and write software. Others I still use after many years, because they are still a great way to get things done.

You can always learn a new programming language. The things that will be true for ALL languages are things that go along with problem solving and critical thinking: breaking a problem down into its component parts, making logical decisions, and identifying procedural steps. When you find that it's difficult to solve a problem with any of the languages you know, or when a lot of people in your area of work adopt or abandon a particular language, that's a clear signal to start learning a new language.

The frameworks and languages that are "most valuable" are going to depend on the type of project you're working on and the team of people you are working with to do it. If the team already has a group of tools and frameworks that they use, you definitely want to stick with that, even if it's not the "best." Don't strike out on your own unless the group agrees, because someone else will always end up having to work on your code after you.
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Mark’s Answer

Once you've completed your paper, it may seem outdated, but don't let that discourage you. Instead, focus on mastering the theories behind the technologies. Delve into the mechanics of databases, the structures of object-oriented languages, the workings of AI, and the essence of the Turing principle. Remember, languages may come and go, but your understanding of them will keep you in the loop.

To stay at the forefront, you need to constantly evolve. Learn new methodologies, participate in conferences, attend seminars, devour books, and explore blogs. This continuous learning journey will not only keep you relevant but also enrich your knowledge.

Moreover, don't underestimate the power of soft skills, an area often overlooked by many programmers. Securing a well-paid job in this field might be easy, but to truly thrive and excel, you have to go the extra mile. So, keep learning, keep growing, and let your passion for technology guide you towards excellence.
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Jerome’s Answer

The choice of a language and framework will always be dictated by the project and project team; it's like saying "What tool is best for my job?" without specifying the job to be done. Some require hammers, some pliers, and some bulldozers. Likewise, if you're developing for a bare-metal platform (such as an embedded machine) then you'll need to be familiar with languages like C, C++, and assembly. If you're interested in systems management then Python, Go, and the OS-specific shell scripting languages like bash, PowerShell are critical. If you're on the web programming side then Java, Javascript (which are NOT the same), the various .js language variants, and .NET, mono, and so forth are your targets. And if you're working with databases, then SQL and whatever other offerings your db engine provides will be needed.

Websites detailing the popularity of various languages do exist and for your specific project, you might want to look at one of those to get an idea of who's using which languages. That may give you a basis for discussion.

Good luck in your career!
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