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What are some good studying habits as a college student?

I need help. #studying-tips #college #studying #study-skills #time-management

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Yvonne’s Answer

Hello Dominique,


Depending on your learning style, I find having a study buddy helps a lot when I was still in college. Having someone to hold me accountable really helps motivate me and I find myself procrastinate less. In days where I struggle to focus on studying, my study partner helps encourage me and keep me going. In addition, we often quiz each other on the class materials to find out if we truly understand them, which really helps us retain the information better.


Aside from having a study buddy, I usually keep my phone on silent and put it away during my study time. Without my phone within my sight, I am less likely to be distracted from notifications or checking on social media apps. Having a specific and measurable goal of what you want to achieve at the end of the study session is also important. That way you are less likely to feel overwhelmed with all the chapters and different subjects you have to study especially before an exam.


Hope this helps, Good luck!

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Monica’s Answer

Hey Dominique,

It's awesome that you're interested in doing well and being efficient in college. Some of the tips I give out when working with students are:

- Having a binder for each subject and writing good notes (or if you have a computer, typing up your notes)- and you can print them.
- I always find that having a few decks of blank index cards really helps. Write down things you need to work on, and you can look at them every day (you can do this while you're waiting for your friends, while you're waiting for class to start etc.).
- Find a time each day to just review your notes, or highlighted sections in your notebook- what time will all depend on you! For example some people do REALLY well with studying in the morning and others are night owls. Just find a time :)
- Find a study group or don't- people all learn differently, sometimes, people need accountability while others need quiet time to study.

These are just a couple of tips, but I'm sure you'll do great!

Best,
Monica Wells, LMHC
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Julianne’s Answer

As a student, I found that creating study guides was the most helpful when I studied. When typing up the information, you can simultaneously absorb the information.

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Simeon’s Answer

It's honestly much better to study in small ten to fifteen minutes sessions multiple times per week as opposed to cram studying. It's way less stressful and the information sticks better. You know how TV advertisements are trying to repeat the same message to you in small chunks multiple times per week? It's the same thing. Our brains retain information way better when its repeated often in small chunks. When you have multiple hour study sessions, the odds are that you're going to be zoning off once the first thirty to forty minutes have passed.
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Jazhel’s Answer

Hi Dominique,

For me, what works well is if I study ahead of time. I always give myself more than enough time because I don’t like cramming. I retain information if I cram. I also try breaking down the material so it’s not overwhelming. Another thing I try is minimize distractions and make sure that I’m rested so I really take in what I’m studying. I think taking breaks is important so I don’t push myself too hard. Staying hydrated and eating well and enough is equally important as well. I tend to get lazy if I'm too full or tired if I don't eat properly. I hope this helps.

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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Dominique:

Many students realize that their high school study habits aren’t very effective in college. This is understandable, as college is quite different from high school. The professors are less personally involved, classes are bigger, exams are worth more, reading is more intense, and classes are much more rigorous. That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with you; it just means you need to learn some more effective study skills. Here are a few ideas for active studying habits and skills. . .

• CREATE A STUDY GUIDE BY TOPIC - Formulate questions and problems and write complete answers. Create your own quiz
• BECOME A TEACHER - Say the information aloud in your own words as if you are the instructor and teaching the concepts to a class
• USE EXAMPLES - Derive examples that relate to your own experiences
• CREATE CONCEPT MAPS - Create concept maps or diagrams that explain the material
• DEVELOP SYMBOLS - Develop symbols that represent concepts
• FIGURE OUT THE BIG IDEAS - For non-technical classes (e.g., English, History, Psychology), figure out the big ideas so you can explain, contrast, and re-evaluate them
• WORK THE PROBLEMS - For technical classes, work the problems and explain the steps and why they work
• STUDY IN TERMS OF QUESTION, EVIDENCE & CONCLUSION - Study in terms of question, evidence, and conclusion: What is the question posed by the instructor/author? What is the evidence that they present? What is the conclusion?

Others have shared some great advice from the CV Prof community that is very insightful. Best of luck to you! 📚

Sheila recommends the following next steps:

Studying 101: Study Smarter not Harder • https://learningcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/studying-101-study-smarter-not-harder/
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