8 answers

Should I choose a school based upon preference or financial needs?

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I am a senior that is going into computer science. I really love this one college but I also know my finances should be taken into consideration. I am told I will get the same degree regardless but at the same time I know this is the school I really want to go to. What should I do?

#college #college-selection #college-advice #financial-services

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8 answers

Collette’s Answer

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Hi Kim,


I don't encourage anyone to get into debt to go to college. I recommend ranking the programs and then also ranking by affordability. Find the balance, keeping in mind that a solid Computer Science undergraduate degree can be obtained from many institutions. If finances are a concern, consider obtaining an AA degree first and transferring into a 4 year institution. There are so many pathways you can take that would accomplish your goals without breaking the bank.


Definitely apply to scholarships like it is your full time job! I know one young lady who took a year off between high school and college and did just that. She was able to raise enough money to pay for 4 years of education via scholarships and essay contests.



Best of luck!

Collette



Collette recommends the following next steps:

  • https://myscholly.com/
Kim, go to the school you like best. You will do fine if you are in a happy place David Gladstone Translate
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Richard’s Answer

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There are some fields like politics or business that rely on connections you can make during school.
In other fields like science, engineering and medicine, the institution on your diploma matters less.

I believe that computer science falls into the second category. It would be better to go to a school that fits your financial situation. No need to go into debt if it won't help your future career.
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Breanna’s Answer

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You should choose a school on both your preferences and financial needs. I attended a school that was outside my budget but I wouldn't change that experience for the world, it was my dream school and I’m so happy I get to say I graduated from there. BUT, it wasn’t my dream school during high school I had to look at my preferences and see what I really wanted from a school to realize that this was the best fit for me. It was out of my budget but something I was able to work out.

If you have your heart set on a school but you just can’t afford all four years, look into attending a junior college first then transferring out to your Dream school. Some schools have fast track programs to get you into four year universities as well.

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Jessica’s Answer

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I'd say look in to the reviews that college has for your degree there are several school that are know for certain fields of study that could help in expanding your "dream" school. Thinking of finances I'd say look into scholarships for your desired major and start applying, apply to as many scholarships as possible. to help take stress off of worrying about money. There are a lot of ways to pay and finance college you just have to be creative.

Jessica recommends the following next steps:

  • Apply for scholarships
  • See if your school has scholarships for that major, apprenticeships etc...
  • Apply for scholarships
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Kaylee’s Answer

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I would say both but I would look into what you could get for financial purposes such as aid and maybe that could help you.
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Tonya’s Answer

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That’s a tough one! But to a certain extent you are correct a degree is a degree. There will be some organizations that have “preferred” schools they will recruit from but just because you don’t go to one of those schools doesn’t mean that you won’t get a job in your field. You can get a competitive advantage by volunteering with non-profits in a skilled capacity and building your personal and professional network. This carries great value in the marketplace!
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Rachel’s Answer

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<span style="background-color: transparent;">Collegeboard.org is a great resource for this! I poured through the pages of universities all over the U.S. when I was a senior in high school. Collegeboard was my go-to site! They put all of the information in one place and it is very easy to use. They even have various filters you can apply to see only colleges that have programs you are interested. To determine academic rigor, look at the admissions requirements, G.P.A. of past admitted applicants, SAT/ACT scores, class rank etc. This will give you an idea of what scores and grades you need to be accepted. However, don't be discouraged your application will be reviewed based on the full picture! College-board will help you get an idea of what is most important to the specific school you are applying to.</span>


This professional recommends the following next steps:

  • <span style="background-color: transparent;">Chat with your Guidance Counselor</span>
  • <span style="background-color: transparent;">Create a Collegeboard.org account</span>
  • <span style="background-color: transparent;">Start using CollegeBoard as a resource to look up schools.</span>


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Rachel’s Answer

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Both should be taken into consideration. Attending classes at a community college, choosing a state school, and applying to all scholarships available can minimize cost. That said, you should not base your decision completely on price. If there is a school you feel compelled to attend, often there are ways to make it happen, even if that means having more loans in the future.
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