4 answers

Which IT discipline is best if you're weak in math?

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4 answers

Dave’s Answer

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I too am not a math whiz. But I've held jobs as a software developer, analyst, manager, sales rep and project manager in the IT field. I think the math skill is overstressed and maybe it's more relevant to ask if you are a logical , linear thinker? Are you a musician? Are you good with languages, like do you learn foreign languages easily? These skill may point you towards whether software development is a good fit for you?

Are you organized? Do you keep to do lists? Are you the person others go to when they need someone to plan and organize an event? If so, you may be a good project manager.

Do you like to break things? Do you like to analyze what made something fail or break? If so, you may be a good quality assurance analyst.

Are you an analytical person? do you like to create things out of an idea? can you write and communicate well? If so, you may be a good business analyst.


There are a few ideas for you that may expand your options a bit as you consider your next steps. Best Wishes!




Dave recommends the following next steps:

  • Check out these sites for project management: pmi.org, scrumalliance.org
  • Check out these sites for information on business analysis: IIBA.org
  • Find people on LinkedIn who you can follow or connect with , who are thought leaders in Information Technology.
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Benjamin’s Answer

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Most IT careers are not very math intensive. Computer Scientists and engineers are more the math heavy pursuits.

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Patrick’s Answer

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I'm terrible at math. You don't need great math skills to be a Systems Administrator - areas like Information Systems, Human Factors, and Cloud Computing. Honestly you can even be a programmer if you like doing it. There are many different types of programmers out there - somebody who's weak in math won't be developing complex algorithms or working on processors or compilers. But there's a lot more to programming than just being good at math, and a lot more opportunity out there than just math-focused programmers.

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Philip’s Answer

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I was OK at math, but when I went to college I lost interest in any higher math pursuits.


There are a lot of options in IT which do not require deep math knowledge:

  1. Project Management
  2. Business Analysts
  3. IT Security
  4. IT Audit
  5. Application/Client Support
  6. Architecture Design

etc.


Some of the programming might not need math, but certainly logic!


Don't let this stop you! Take a look at some of these career options by talking to some of your IT friends, taking a course or two, and/or interning at an IT job.

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