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How do I get a great job after graduation?

After graduating, I've seen many folks get minimum wage jobs, what's the best approach to finding a good paying job? #career-plan

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Tyler’s Answer

Nick,
The best way to get a great job after graduation is to take action as soon as possible. Utilize tools such as Career Village, and LinkedIn to network with industry professionals in whatever role you want to get into. Aside from that it is a great idea to join as many clubs in school and work to get as much experience in internships as possible. Experience and networking are the most effective ways to get a great job after graduation. Best of luck!
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Jeremy’s Answer

Nick,
I would encourage you to find a career path that you are passionate about. Look beyond the money. Money will not ensure your happiness if you hate your job. Find something that you are passionate about and pursue that field. If jobs in that field pay well, that a bonus! If your passionate about what your doing, it is much easier to be successful in your chosen career path. I hope this helps.
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Tatiana’s Answer

New graduates are offered minimum wages because, to prospect employers, they are “dark horses” and high risks. To beat that perception and secure a good-paying job right after graduation, you’ll need to get industry-relevant experience and proven results before you graduate. You probably know about internships and such, they are necessary. But to really stand out from other graduates, do these three things:

1) take all your internships/volunteering/part-time projects seriously, don’t just “get a feel” for the job but deliver the results expected by your employers.

2) track and improve your results based on the feedback from your internship supervisors or customers.

3) then present your results wrapped up nicely (i.e. provide numbers, cases, portfolio) in your application and at the job interviews; demonstrate that you are a problem-solver rather than a “green hand”.
It is only the problem-solvers that are offered good wages.

P.S. And, of course, get good references for each of your projects, too.

Good luck,

first-job , salary-negotiation , college-jobs
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Donna’s Answer

Nick;

You have a lot of good advice here. I have a couple questions for you. Why do you want this "good paying" job? Is it because you do not want to go to college? Is it because of financial strains in the family? You have to understand your motivation for this "good paying" job and where you want to go with it.

If you are looking for this "good paying" job to to be your foot into and industry that you can promote in and lead to other increases in pay and position, then Jeremy has offered excellent advise. For example, if your interest is in telecommunications, an entry level job may be in sales or in the construction field (splicer or lineman) or maybe as installation technician. Eventually to promote you will need some type of college, but most of your major players like Verizon and AT&T offer tuition assistance after a year of employment.

If your college goals and ultimate aspirations are hindered by family finances, I encourage you to work with your counselors and do your own research on scholarships and other means of finance for a college education. Then probably that part time job is a better choice as your focus will be on school and not a career. That is not to say you can't have a "good paying" and advancing career while going to college. Just a little more added pressures and maybe night and weekend college.

If there are other factors that I have not listed here, I encourage you to talk to a trusted adult. Explain why and what you are thinking and ask for their advice. You don't have to follow their advice, just get their input from their years of experience. Maybe ask individuals if you could go back and change the directions and steps you took out of high school what would you change. You can get a lot of insight from that single question.
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