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How can I find some career guidance?

I graduated college and I am unemployed but I am having a hard time finding a job, I feel a little disoriented. How can I find some career guidance?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Boyd’s Answer

We probably could use a bit more information to assist….

What was your major(s) in college?

What are you interested in doing for a career? Does that align with what your major is?

Does your college have any resources for career counseling or job placement assistance (even though you graduated they might still offer it)?

You might consider looking into a career counselor or occupational specialist to help get you started on the right track.

Take career assessment tests to help get you started possibly. At least get you thinking about possibilities.
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Alexander’s Answer

Hi, I am Alex. I know entering the corporate world could be difficult to navigate but there are some steps you may need to assess before continuing your job search.
1. Know the job you want to apply into.
2. Make sure your resume is well organized not too wordy and not to blank.
3.Be confident and assertive.
4. YouTube had great hiring interviews and resume building projects.
5.Make sure your Linked in is Vamped up.
6. Most importantly it's okay to not have experience because you have education to back your resume.

Good luck.

Alexander recommends the following next steps:

YouTube interview operations
Vamp up your Linked In
Podcast on jobs in your field
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Chirayu’s Answer

Hi, Isabella! There are several ways to find career guidance and resources to help you in your job search: Most colleges and universities have a Career Services Center that can help alumni with their job search. You can take advantage of their resources, such as resume and cover letter reviews, job search workshops, and access to job databases. Consider joining a professional association related to your field of interest. These organizations often provide job listings, career development workshops, and networking opportunities. There are many online resources available for career guidance, such as career websites, blogs, and forums. Some popular websites include LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and Indeed. Networking is a key component of a successful job search. Reach out to friends, family, former colleagues, and alumni from your college for job leads and advice. Attend industry events, conferences, and networking events to meet people in your field and expand your network. Consider working with a career counselor or coach who can provide individualized career guidance and support. They can help you clarify your career goals, assess your skills and strengths, and develop a job search strategy. Best of luck!



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Tim’s Answer

Hi Isabella,

Start by utilizing your school's career center. You can speak to a counselor and determine what line of work you'd like to do.
If what you studied in college is what you see yourself doing professionally, find out what the demand for that job/career is in your town and focus your efforts at applying for the position you want with those companies. Find out if there are any additional professional requirements needed to get that position (i.e., 5 years exp). You can go directly to the company's website to apply or any job board might have a posting matching what you are looking for. You can also apply to supporting industries that have more of those entry level positions available in order to gain the experience needed and later make the transition. Hope that helps.
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Michael’s Answer

Hi Isabella,

Congrats on earning your college degree! What was your major? Are there specific types of jobs that you are focusing on to utilize your degree? Have you reached out to your fellow graduates for job leads, etc.?

Have you networked with your professors back at your college? The professors can provide you with professional contacts and information on companies in need of college graduates. They can also provide a list of alumni who you can reach out to for full-time employment opportunities. Another great resource for information is a student organization that is primarily focused for graduates with your major.

The Career Service Center on campus is where students go to research information for company profiles and points of contact. Full-time employment opportunities will be listed by the CSC staff. The CSC staff can assist in resume writing, interviewing skills, networking, job fairs, etc.

LinkedIn is a website of professionals. One can search and view profiles of professionals from all industries. An introductory message can be sent to a professional on LinkedIn. You can inquire with the professional about your interests in your major and what you are looking for in regards to full-time employment opportunities. Also, you can build your initial profile with information such as your educational pathway, accomplished degree, concentration courses, certifications, campus activities and organizations, etc. , so that professionals can view your background history as well.

LinkedIn is also a job portal. Meaning, one can apply for posted positions and opportunities that companies are currently hiring for. The company will have its profile listed, so that one can view what the company does, contact information, website links, etc.

Here is the website for LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com

Once as a full-time employee, there will be some companies that offer educational benefits. Meaning, if the degree or advanced degree is job related, the company will pay for the tuition for the full-time employee. This is a great way to go after your graduate degree without taking out additional loans or grants and be in education debt after graduation.

Network ... Network ... Network ... the more people who know that you are looking for full-time employment opportunities ... the better your chances of getting hired. Sometimes it is not what you know, but who you know. Chin up, keep positive and keep moving forward!

Best wishes in your future career endeavors!
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Purva’s Answer

Hi Isabella,
I understand the feeling but one thing that has worked well for me is reaching out to industry professional on LinkedIn. While reaching out to industry professional, send a brief message asking for guidance for career growth and try to contact people with your similar degree or schools so that you can get better advice from similar background people.
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William’s Answer

Hi Isabella!

Kindly order a copy of this book below, and go through it. It has all your answers.

Careers The Ultimate Guide to Planning Your Future, New Edition by DORLING KINDERSLEY LTD.

Success.
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Vickie’s Answer


Congratulations on obtaining your degree. I know lots of dedication and hard work went into accomplishing this goal. There are many ways for new grads to job search. You can start with your school's career center. Many companies work directly with colleges and universities to help fill their entry level openings. Additionally, make sure you stay active on various networking sites and connect with people at your target companies. Networking is one of the best ways to get your foot in the door. Don't rule out career sites; sometimes job search is simply a numbers game.
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Paul A’s Answer

Good question! Relax you have plenty of time to explore this. When I graduated from college I didn't have a clue and signs said last person out of Seattle turn out the lights. I was 29 and had spent 5 years in college after 4 years in the Air Force. I had six jobs my first 2 years out of college and felt pretty disgruntled and scared. Decided to borrow $50 bucks from my friend and moved to Los Angeles and had 3 good job offers in a week. By the age of 32 I was the Director of Training for an Insurance company in San Francisco. By the age of 35, I realized I was not cut out to be an employee. When I retired at 86 I had been Self Employed as an International Sales Training Consultant for 8 major companies with large dealer networks for 15 years, was an Executive and Life Coach, an Organizational Culture Change Catalyst, Public Speaker, a published Poet and Author - Time To Wake Up and SHINE in a 30+ year trip. My HS grad grade point was 2.01 including a B in Bonehead English.

My point is get curious, get passionate about things that inspire you. Get clear what your gifts, talents and abilities and interests are! I decided at age 35 I wanted to be a Sales Training Consultant, googled it and discovered there was a branch of a sales training company (16 locations) near where I lived. I talked them into hiring me and it started me on a journey and adventure I could have never imagined! Lighten up, have more fun with this and care less about what other people think about your trip.. Go to You Tube and check out Earl Nightingale, Google occupations you might like see what comes up . Allow yourself to be led. Check out Indigo Pathways website. Check their free test!

All the Best. By the way I recently unretired and am playing with an extraordinary project called My Vervescent Vision. Vervescent is a word I made up - Verve and Magnificent. Start making up your Ideal Life and see what it might look like! Why Not?
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Archived’s Answer

I know the feeling. Don't be discouraged and keep looking for work. One good source is the US government. Have a look at the civil service jobs at https://www.usa.gov/government-jobs.

You may also want to consider decisions on your part that are limiting your job prospects, e.g.,
Are you willing to relocate?
Are you willing to take a job outside of your field of study in college?
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Brandy’s Answer

I know this will be repetitive to some of the other answers but NETWORK. Linkedin is a good professional social network and depending on the job you are seeking, I would evaluate the content of your personal social media and what is available for public view. An employer may not be able to determine employment by reviewing your socials but it may drive some pre-judgement about how you present yourself. Lastly most unemployment agencies offer career counseling for free. When getting ready for an interview, most companies use what is called the star format so practice outlining responses in Situation, Task, Action and Results and be detailed.
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Sarah’s Answer

Hi, Isabella!

I'm Sarah! Good question and congratulations on graduating! I was just in this same position two years ago, so I completely understand how it feels. It is a frustrating place to be in, and as you said, can be very disorienting. Here are a few things that helped me out:

1. Bolster your resume/CV and have trusted people in your life look over it and suggest things that could be helpful (sometimes you forget things that you've done or think something you've done isn't useful when it is).

2. Engage and stay active on LinkedIn.
-like pages for companies you are interested in
-reach out to others that have similar interests/career path goals

3. Reach out to your alumnus college/university's career help center for connections and additional resources.

4. Virtual and in-person job fairs are also a great places to network.

5. Keep up with relevant certifications and industry knowledge while searching.

6. Keep an open mind. Look for other opportunities that could lead you down another career path, but still use the skills you learned in higher education. I am not sure what career path you are wanting to head down, but I ended up in a completely different field than what I went to school for; however, I am still using things I learned every day and really enjoy what I am doing.

I hope that helps a little! You are definitely not alone in feeling this way, or alone in the situation you are in. Good luck!!
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Donna’s Answer

The college that you graduated from has resources for graduates in this area. Your success is their success so they stand to gain from your employment. That's where I would start if I were you.
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John’s Answer

Congratulations on graduating!

I have found the best way to begin the career journey is to start having conversations with people who are currently employed in fields you are interested in. Often times this helps narrow your job search to understand what you'd most enjoy. These people can also share how to tailor your resume for their specific jobs and can likely get you in touch with hiring managers. There is nothing more powerful than a strong referral when looking for a job!
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Michael’s Answer

Hi Isabella, in addition to the other suggestions here (LinkedIn, resources from college, etc.) don’t be afraid to use your personal network of friends & family. Ask your contacts what they do, how they got there, and (if interested in their line of work) whether they know of any opportunities for entry level positions.
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