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How can I use my expertise in Chemistry for other things other than Science?

How can I use my expertise in Chemistry for anything other than science? Being a teacher is a good thing, but I would like to go down a different path because I wouldn't say I like the prospect of being a teacher.

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Rafael’s Answer

If you have expertise in chemistry but don't want to pursue a traditional science-related career, there are still plenty of alternative paths to consider. You could explore opportunities in patent law, where your knowledge of chemistry can be valuable in protecting intellectual property. Environmental consulting is another option, where you can assess and analyze the impact of pollutants. Additionally, fields like forensic science, pharmaceutical sales, quality control, science communication, product development, brewing and distilling, environmental conservation, materials science, and chemical sales offer diverse avenues to apply your chemistry expertise in unique and fulfilling ways. To explore alternative career paths for your chemistry expertise, seek reviews and advice from your professor, career center, and professionals in the fields you're interested in. They can provide valuable insights, resources, and networking opportunities!
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Robert’s Answer

A bit further removed from the fine suggestions in the other answers:
Journalism (especially being a science writer)
Writing (plays/scripts/books, especially science fiction, as well as technical writing)
Book editing (especially of technical writing)
Pyrotechnics (making fireworks)
Management/business (of chemists or in a chemical industry)

I would say these are the most common, other than the regulatory affairs, law, forensics, and teaching others have brought up. I myself write teaching books (chemistry lab manuals), but that requires you actually *do* a decent amount of chemistry. Writing textbooks, not so much!

I'll also add, though far less likely:
Politics (This is mostly wishful thinking, but some chemical understanding is dearly needed in politics!)
Sales (Especially selling chemicals but also scientific equipment, environmental monitoring, etc.)
Warehousing (for the above)
Naming (coming up with names for new drugs...no, really, it is a job! Foreign language knowledge a big plus for this one)
Repair/Maintenance (of scientific instruments, engines, water treatment systems...stuff with a chemical angle)

Good luck, there is a world of possibilities out there!

Robert recommends the following next steps:

See also https://www.acs.org/careers/chemical-sciences.html
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Aditi’s Answer

Hi John. I noticed that in your question you say 'other than science' but your description only refers to teaching. In case you mean that you'd like to avoid becoming a school/college teacher, but you are open to other fields in science, you have many options:
1. researcher at a chemicals manufacturing company
2. researcher at an innovation-based company e.g. the ones coming up with brand new materials, like biodegradable plastics
3. higher level role at a chemicals based company - e.g. leading and managing teams because you understand the product/work better than the average manager
4. government: work in regulatory affairs, environmental policy, etc.
5. non-profits like Chemists without Borders and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
6. funding organizations like the Gates foundation, which need people to identify the most promising non-profits for them to invest in
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