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What do I need to be successful?

What do I need to be successful

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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6 answers


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Doc’s Answer

• DREAM – Don’t limit your thinking. You have much more imagination than you think
• EVALUATE – Carefully examine your motives and realistically match your talents with any new endeavor.
• THINK – Determine both the immediate goal and the long-term consequences of the new endeavor.
• PLAN – Write down the key success factors and specific action items that need to be focused on to achieve your strategy.
• COMMUNICATION – Provide a compelling and persuasive rationale for your endeavor first to yourself and then to your team
• TAKE ACTION – Act immediately on your endeavor focused on the critical success factors and specific action items
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Jerome’s Answer

I agree with one of the other answers. Consider what you view as success. It used to be having a house and a white picket fence. With the world we live in today, some work just enough to get by and travel as much as possible. For others, dedicating their life to non-profit work and improving the world is their definition of success.

Once you know which general direction you want to go in, surround yourself with people who have done the same thing (or at least want similar things from life). There are so many associations and groups available that will help you along the way.
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Mary’s Answer

Well first of all, you have to define what success means to you, and I hate to say it but that might actually take a really long time. It's something you learn and understand more as you go. There are many layers to it, and there's no easy, one-size-fits-all answer.

For example: you asked "What does it take to be successful?"

Successful at what? At life? What's being successful at life? Is it making a lot of money, or is it being a good parent? It's going to require a completely different set of skills on a completely different path if you're goal is making money versus being a good parent. What you need to succeed in the film industry is way different than what you need to be successful in the medical field. And consider this, if being financially independent is the goal, you can achieve that through criminal activity. But is that the kind of life you want?

It starts by peeling back all those layers and asking yourself what do you really want.

Mary recommends the following next steps:

We always ask you kids what you want to be when you grow up. What were your answers? What's something you're thinking of persuing? Write it down, and then ask yourself why. You want to be a veterinarian? Why? Because you like helping animals? Why? Keep answering the questions and keep asking why. See what you uncover about yourself.
Take a look at the answers you gave and ask yourself more about it. You want to be a veterinarian because you like helping animals. Why do you like helping animals, and not other people? Would you ever consider being a people doctor? Do you think it's easier being an animal doctor (fun fact: it's not, because you have to learn a bunch of different bodies, and not just human bodies.) Do you like animals because you don't want to deal with people? Do you know your coworkers will be people, and so will the owners of the animals you work with. Maybe you would rather run an animal sanctuary instead of a pet hospital. Go through and ask yourself more in depth questions about what you value.
Do this with multiple aspects of your life, not just what you want for a career. Do you want to get married? Do you want to have kids? Do you want to go away to college? Do you want to stay close to your family? Ask yourself questions about what you want for the future and ask yourself some in depth questions about why you want it.
Once you have a better gage of what you really want out of life, and what your values and needs are, you can better plan for your future. If you really have a heart to be a parent someday, but aren't ready for married life yet, maybe persue an education in early childhood development or human psychology. Learn something that will be useful for what you truely want, but in the meantime you can get real world experience and have skills that can help you find work.
Remember: you won't find all the answers right now. You will learn more as you go, and will always be developing a deeper understanding of what you want. This is just an exercise to help guide you to the next step for now.
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Fred’s Answer

First and foremost, you need a definition of what "successful" means to you. It may be having a job that has you travel the world. It may be getting married and owning a house. It may be living in an apartment in New York.

Nobody but you can decide what "successful" means.

What ELSE you need depends on the above.
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Richard’s Answer

This is easy. You need integrity, honesty, and hard work.

Successful people are not aiming for second place. Are you always giving 100% to ensure that you are respecting yourself and representing yourself and your goals in the eyes of others?

The only other item is to pursue something that you are great at. I know people tell folks to do what is fun, but I do not agree with that. You instead, should focus on career opportunities where you are able to become a maximum contributor.

Look no further than professional sports for an example. Today there is a college basketball team with a player who is 7'4". By comparison, I am 5'8" and while I love basketball and have a lot of energy, I am really not a candidate for college basketball (and I wasn't at the time that I was a college student either).

So, my love of basketball does not make me a candidate to be a leading scorer in the NBA. I could easily get a job doing analytics in the NBA though because, complex analysis is a skillset that I have.

And if you are so young that you do not know what you are good at - get out there, start working or volunteering, take a variety of courses, learn your best skills, and when you find out what you are awesome at, leverage those skills in your career and success will come easily.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Blayke,

Blueprint for Triumph in College and Personal Growth

1. Laying a Solid Academic Foundation

Achieving victory in college requires a robust foundation in your chosen subjects. This encompasses a thorough grasp of fundamental concepts, effective study routines, and adept time management. Consider enrolling in advanced or honors courses in high school to acclimate yourself to the demands of college-level work. Utilize resources like Khan Academy or other online educational platforms to reinforce and expand your knowledge in specific areas.

2. Selecting the Ideal College

Choosing a college that aligns with your academic, social, and financial requirements is pivotal to your success. Investigate various institutions, taking into account aspects such as size, location, cost, available resources, and course offerings. Campus visits, conversations with current students and faculty, and analysis of graduation rates and career prospects can provide invaluable insights into the most suitable college for you. *Pro Tip: Apply to a diverse array of colleges, including safety, match, and reach schools, to bolster your chances of acceptance and financial aid.

3. Crafting a Financial Strategy

Given the high costs of college education, it's crucial to formulate a clear financial strategy. Explore diverse funding avenues for your education, like scholarships, grants, loans, and work-study programs. Submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) promptly to optimize your financial aid prospects. Be conscious of your budget and living costs during college, and ponder part-time work or internships to help defray expenses.

4. Prioritizing Mental Well-being and Self-Care

Upholding sound mental health and practicing self-care are critical for personal growth and academic achievement. Strive for a balanced schedule that accommodates study time, extracurricular activities, exercise, and relaxation. Cultivate healthy stress management strategies and reach out to friends, family, or mental health professionals for support when necessary.

5. Cultivating Soft Skills

Soft skills like communication, teamwork, problem-solving, and critical thinking are in high demand in the professional world and will serve you well throughout your college journey and beyond. Seize opportunities to enhance these skills through group assignments, internships, volunteering, or leadership roles in clubs or organizations.

6. Building a Network

Fostering relationships with professors, peers, industry professionals, and alumni can open doors to invaluable connections and opportunities during your college years and afterwards. Attend networking events, engage in internships or job shadowing, participate in online professional communities, and keep in touch with your network through regular communication and updates.

7. Establishing Clear Objectives

Setting short-term and long-term objectives can steer your college journey and personal growth. Regularly review your progress towards these objectives and adjust as needed to stay on course. Establish both academic and personal objectives that resonate with your values and passions for a comprehensive college experience.

8. Embracing Change

College is a period of expansion and discovery; be ready to welcome change and adapt to novel situations. This might involve modifying your academic plans or major, discovering new interests or hobbies, or overcoming unforeseen challenges or hurdles. Welcoming change can spur personal growth and unveil new opportunities that might not have been accessible otherwise.

May God Bless You!
James Constantine Frangos.
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