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How should you get started I'd you want to major in software engineering? College or University?

Would SJCC be a good choice for a 2 year and would transferring to SJSU be a good choice to go after the 2 years in college?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Patrick’s Answer

If you're thinking about a software engineering major, it's crucial to consider the benefits and opportunities different schools offer. Both colleges and universities can help you get on the right path to a software engineering career, each with its unique pros and cons.

Starting at a community college like San Jose City College (SJCC) can be a great move, especially if you're looking for a cost-effective option or if you're not ready to commit to a four-year university just yet. SJCC offers lower tuition, smaller classes, and flexible schedules, allowing you to study basic math, computer science, and programming while saving money. Plus, community colleges often have agreements with four-year universities like San Jose State University (SJSU), making it easy to move on to a bachelor's degree program after finishing your associate degree.

After finishing your two-year program at SJCC, transferring to SJSU can be a smart strategy if you're aiming for a bachelor's degree in software engineering from a well-known university. SJSU is recognized for its strong computer science and engineering programs, with experienced teachers, a comprehensive curriculum, and access to resources and opportunities in Silicon Valley, a tech and innovation hub. By moving to SJSU, you can build on the basic knowledge and skills you gained at SJCC and dive deeper into specialized software engineering courses, algorithms, database systems, software development methods, and more. SJSU also offers internships, research opportunities, networking events, and career services to help you gain practical experience and industry connections.

Before you make a choice, it's crucial to research and compare the curriculum, faculty expertise, facilities, student support services, and internship and career placement opportunities at both SJCC and SJSU. Consider talking to current students, graduates, and academic advisors at both schools to get their insights and perspectives on their experiences and the quality of education. Also, look into transfer requirements, agreements, and admission criteria for moving from SJCC to SJSU to ensure a smooth transition and increase your chances of success.

In the end, the best decision for you will depend on your personal situation, preferences, and goals. Whether you start at SJCC and move to SJSU or go straight to SJSU for a bachelor's degree, focus on getting a strong foundation in math, basic computer science, and programming skills. Also, make sure to take advantage of hands-on learning, networking, and professional development opportunities to prepare for a successful software engineering career.
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Avirup’s Answer

Start with python, watch content online to get a grasp of the language and start working on small projects that you actually enjoy. The best way to learn new programming languages and frameworks is to center it around a project or idea you want to make! If you are in school, you could use your college classes as building blocks and foundation for how you code. The most important topics are Data Structures, and Algorithms so make sure to pay extra attention to those topics. Work hard and good luck!
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Teisha’s Answer

In any professional journey, understanding the jargon and earning high grades is just the beginning. The key focus should be on networking. The more people you connect with, the more doors of opportunity you will open. Begin by joining an online community that shares your interests. If you're still in school, take the initiative to contact student services, a counselor, or a teacher you admire. Inquire about any programs you can join. Participating in internships or externships will provide you with practical experience. If you demonstrate impressive performance throughout these programs, you could potentially use them as a reference in the future.
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Elizabeth (Betsy)’s Answer

Hi Antonio,

I would recommend that you start with the city college first. The courses at city colleges and community colleges can provide a broad introduction to many topics, including math, science and software topics. They also cost a little less, if the expense for college is an issue. For my son, it was helpful to complete some of his fundamental coursework at the local community college and then transfer those credits to the university, where he finished his degree. It cost him less money in the end, because he didn't have to pay for four years at the university.

Good luck.
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