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nursing or internal medicine doctor ?

I was wondering is internal medicine doctor better then LPN in salary & skills ?
Also how long does it take to become a Internal Medicine, and what degrees and license are required ?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Faith’s Answer

Hello Maimouna

Below is the answer to your question I hope it helps

In general, internal medicine doctors typically earn a higher salary and possess more advanced skills compared to Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). Internal medicine doctors are medical doctors who have completed medical school and a residency program specializing in internal medicine, while LPNs are licensed nursing professionals who provide basic patient care under the supervision of registered nurses and physicians.

To become an Internal Medicine doctor, one must first complete a bachelor's degree (usually in a science-related field), followed by medical school, which typically takes 4 years. After medical school, aspiring internal medicine doctors must complete a residency program in internal medicine, which lasts around 3 years.

Internal Medicine doctors must also obtain a medical license to practice, which involves passing the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) or the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Exam (COMLEX), depending on whether they are an MD or DO.

In terms of salary, internal medicine doctors earn a higher salary compared to LPNs due to their advanced medical training and qualifications. The exact salary can vary depending on factors such as location, experience, and type of practice.

In summary, becoming an internal medicine doctor requires a longer and more rigorous educational and training path compared to becoming an LPN. However, the earning potential and level of responsibility are typically higher for internal medicine doctors.

Faith Sani.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Maimouna
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sheen’s Answer

In the simplest and friendliest terms, think of internal medicine as the role of giving orders, while nursing is about following those orders. This should help you decide which role suits you better.

Internal medicine can be quite lucrative, with salaries often ranging from 250-400K per year. This can even increase if you decide to specialize in fields such as Gastroenterology, Cardiology, Endocrinology, or ICU.

On the other hand, nursing can be a truly rewarding experience. However, it requires a great deal of patience and compassion. If you feel you might lack these, it may not be the best fit for you. I've known people who've left the profession because they found it difficult to take orders from those they felt had less experience, like interns or junior doctors.

In the end, both professions have their own rewards. It's all about finding the one that fits you best!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Maimouna
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Martin’s Answer

Here's a friendlier version of your text:

Wow, you've got some tough questions there! But don't worry, I'll do my best to help you understand. So, nursing and internal medicine are like two different planets, but they share a common goal: patient care.

To become a registered nurse (RN), you'll need at least two years of college, but many programs ask for a four-year degree. There's also the option to become a licensed practical nurse (LPN) through an 18-24 month program, but you'll typically work under an RN's supervision. Each program has its own unique courses and hands-on training, so there's not much room for change.

If you're dreaming of climbing the nursing ladder to become a nurse practitioner or a similar specialist, you'll need to add another 3 to 4 years of study. Unless you're working while studying, your hands-on experience will be limited to what you get during your nursing program. The truth is, nurses really start learning the ropes after they pass their exams and start gaining real-world experience.

On the other hand, if you're aiming to become an internal medicine doctor, you'll need four years of college, four years of medical school, and at least three years of residency. Your education and training will be centered around the medical model, which is different from the nursing model.

Despite their differences, both paths aim for the same goal and need a team effort. The pay scales are also different. As an LPN or RN, you'll likely be paid by the hour and your earnings will depend on your skills, specialty, and location. You'll also usually work under the supervision of a physician or another practitioner.

Physicians earn significantly more, but their education and residency are long and costly. So, they'll need many years to pay off their debts. Plus, as a physician, you'll have the highest degree of a healthcare license. This means you'll be responsible for everyone working under you, and most importantly, for the patient.
Thank you comment icon Martin, thank you! Maimouna
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Paul’s Answer

James Constantine's answer above is a complete outline of the differences between the two professions. I would like to add some advice to it to help you learn the things you need to know to help you make a good decision. The first thing I would suggest is that you find a health care professional who is willing to spend some time talking to you. You need to learn more about health care in general in order to guide your decision, and the best way to learn is by direct conversation with a person who has the time to talk to you and answer your questions. As you can see from Mr. Constantine's answer, there is a tremendous difference betwee the two professions, even though both are based in health care. If there is a nurse available at your school, talking to thast person would help you learn more about the differencesbetween the two professions. Another option would be to look for volunteer oportunities at hospitals near you. This would give you direct experience with health care professionals and the best chance to get answers to questions as they arise, and would likely be the quickest way to get answers to your questions.

Paul recommends the following next steps:

Talk to any doctor or nurse you can make contact with to learn what their daily life at work is like. You will find that there are huge differences.
Try to find a volunteer position in a hospital or some other health care service to give you direct experience in the world of health care.
If there is a nurse that works at your school regularly, try to get to know that person and ask her/him for guidance, especially looking for usefull things you might read.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the help. Maimouna
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Dr.Sneha’s Answer

Path to Becoming an Internal Medicine Specialist:

1. Secure a Bachelor's Degree: The journey typically begins with a four-year bachelor's degree in a science-related field.
2. Ace the MCAT: The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), a standardized exam, is a crucial stepping stone to medical schools.
3. Finish Medical School: This involves a four-year dedication, culminating in a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree.
4. Undertake a Residency Program: A three-year residency program in internal medicine is the next stage after medical school.
5. Get Licensed: It's essential to have a medical license in the state where you'll practice. The usual requirements include graduating from an accredited medical school and passing the USMLE or COMLEX.
6. Pursue Board Certification (Optional): Many doctors choose to get board-certified through the ABIM, which requires passing a rigorous exam.

Journey to Becoming an LPN:

1. Obtain a High School Diploma or GED: This is typically the minimum requirement to start your journey.
2. Finish an Accredited Practical Nursing Program: These programs usually span 12 to 18 months, leading to a certificate or diploma in practical nursing.
3. Secure Licensure: After completing the program, LPNs need to pass the NCLEX-PN to get licensed in their state of practice.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Maimouna
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Maimoiuna,

Comparing Salaries and Skills: Internal Medicine Doctor versus LPN

Typically, an internal medicine doctor earns a greater income and has more advanced skills compared to a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). Internal medicine doctors are medical professionals who have completed medical school and a specialized residency program in internal medicine. On the other hand, LPNs are licensed nursing professionals who deliver basic patient care under the guidance of registered nurses and physicians.

To become an internal medicine doctor, you need to first obtain a bachelor's degree, preferably in a science-related field. This is followed by 4 years of medical school. Afterward, you have to complete a 3-year residency program in internal medicine.

To practice as an internal medicine doctor, you need a medical license. You can get this by passing either the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) or the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Exam (COMLEX), depending on whether you're an MD or DO.

When it comes to income, internal medicine doctors typically earn more than LPNs. This is due to their advanced medical training and qualifications. However, the exact income can vary based on factors like location, experience, and type of practice.

In summary, the journey to becoming an internal medicine doctor is longer and more challenging compared to that of an LPN. However, the potential for earnings and the level of responsibility are generally higher for internal medicine doctors.

The Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

1. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) - The BLS offers comprehensive data on the incomes of various occupations, including internal medicine doctors and LPNs.
2. American College of Physicians (ACP) - The ACP provides valuable insights into the field of internal medicine, including educational requirements and career prospects.
3. National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) - The NCSBN establishes standards for nursing practice and licensure, offering information on the role of LPNs in healthcare.

These sources have been crucial in providing accurate and current information about the comparison between internal medicine doctors and LPNs in terms of income, skills, education requirements, and licensing.

GOD BLESS!
James Constantine Frangos.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Maimouna,

Here's a comparison of the salary and skills for an Internal Medicine Doctor and a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), highlighting the differences due to education, training, and job responsibilities.

Salary: Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) as of May 2020 shows that the average annual salary for an Internal Medicine Physician was $206,500, whereas an LPN earned an average of $48,820 annually. Remember, salaries can fluctuate based on factors such as geographical location, years of experience, and specialized skills.

Skills: The skill sets for both professions differ. Internal Medicine Doctors, due to their higher level of education and training, are equipped with a broader range of skills. Their responsibilities include diagnosing and treating complex medical conditions, which necessitates strong analytical, decision-making, and communication skills. LPNs, meanwhile, offer basic medical care under the guidance of registered nurses or doctors. Their skills encompass monitoring patient vital signs, administering medications, and adhering to care plans.

Steps to Become an Internal Medicine Doctor:

1. Earn a Bachelor’s Degree: A four-year bachelor's degree program in a science-related field is usually the first step.
2. Pass the MCAT: The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), a standardized exam, is a prerequisite for most medical schools.
3. Complete Medical School: A four-year commitment, medical school results in a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree.
4. Complete a Residency Program: A three-year residency program in internal medicine follows medical school.
5. Obtain Licensure: A medical license in the state of practice is mandatory. The requirements generally include graduation from an accredited medical school and passing the USMLE or COMLEX.
6. Obtain Board Certification (Optional): Many doctors opt to become board-certified through the ABIM, which involves passing a challenging exam.

Steps to Become an LPN:

1. Earn a High School Diploma or GED: A high school diploma or GED is typically the minimum requirement.
2. Complete an Accredited Practical Nursing Program: These programs usually last 12 to 18 months, resulting in a certificate or diploma in practical nursing.
3. Obtain Licensure: After completing the program, LPNs must pass the NCLEX-PN to obtain licensure in their state of practice.

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Maimouna
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