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How to start an art project ?

How do you start an art project like how do you know what yo make what happens if it looks bad do you just throw it away or to you keep it and sell it to make money

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Hellena’s Answer

1. Start by writing down your idea and setting at least three goals to achieve it.
2. Decide on the medium you'll use—drawing, painting, sketching, or inking—and the subject matter.
3. Sketch out your concepts, focusing on "blocking in" to plan your layout.
4. Keep your sketches simple to save time; perfection isn't necessary.
5. Imperfect outcomes are valuable for learning, so don't discard them.
6. Once you're satisfied with a sketch, begin the project using it as a reference.
7. Embrace trial and error; learning from mistakes is crucial for growth.
8. Even unsuccessful attempts contribute to your portfolio's value for future opportunities.
9. Remember, employers and clients appreciate seeing your creative process, not just the final result.
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seyed hamid’s Answer

Hello Brook,

Initial ideas for creating a work of art usually come from paying attention to details, studying, and immersing oneself in similar environments to observe. An artist views subjects through their own perspective. The window through which an artist looks at the world around them is the mirror of their soul. When a painter depicts a rose, it means they have already envisioned that flower in their mind and are recreating its reflection on the canvas. In the execution phase, courage speaks first; one should not think of the end at the starting point but must boldly add colors to the canvas. One should not fear making mistakes and must repeatedly tackle a subject. This is the delightful effort of an artist in creating beauty.

I hope the colors brighten and inspire your life. Wishing you success
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Lance’s Answer

Regardless of the art project you're starting, it's always best to go down the list in this order(of course, as you become more experienced you can modify this how you so choose):

-Brainstorm your ideas with pen and paper first. At this stage of planning, there are no bad ideas but simply ideas with potential.

-Pick the one idea that jumps out to you the most and then begin to refine the idea. You can add to it or take away from it as you please. Remember that your first idea may not always be the best one, so really take your time with this step.

-Further refine the thumbnail rough of your idea to your liking, at this stage you should be able to envision the final piece just from looking at it from this point on.

-Take your rough draft to the digital phase for finalization.

-This is the final part where you add all the extra polish and finish to the piece, where you compare from where you started to where you end up.

This is how I tackle most if not all of my design work and this process works for just about anyone else as well.
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Linda’s Answer

When I was in college I was such a perfectionist that I wanted everything I wanted or drew to be perfect and almost look like a photograph I drove myself crazy so I gave it away to anyone who liked it. 20 years later after no panting or making art when I find myself there I go backwards on the piece of art I start from the end and keep up working to the beginning taking away each element as it was added and do you know what I find magic is wrapped up in all of the I thought, wrong decisions.
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Laura’s Answer

Hello Brook,
Great question! I take it from your question that you either started an art project and are not sure if you should continue it because you feel it looks bad or you want to start an art project and want to know what to do if the project looks bad at a certain point.

To answer your first question on starting a project, there is no right or wrong way to start an art project. I feel typically for an artist or creative person, it usually starts with asking yourself, what is the purpose of creating this project? Is it for a school project? Something you want to make for a friend or family member? Is it something for yourself? Or is it something you intend to sell to make some money? (I added the last one because I saw the last question you asked 😃).

The way I take it from your last question, I assume you want to make art to sell, in that case, to appeal to more people, so you make sales, you can Google search popular subjects in art right now or look at best-selling art pieces on platforms like Etsy, Redbubble, or TeePublic Store. This can help give you an idea of what your art is going to be about, but I believe whatever is it you feel passionate about making creatively is a great way to go.

As for the question about what to do if the art project you're working on starts to look bad to either throw it away or continue with it to eventually sell, that is difficult for someone who is not the artist of the project to answer. Do you feel it's something that can be saved to eventually sell or do you feel you can do better if you try to make it again to sell that one? I know the answer to this question probably wasn't what you wanted to read, but it is completely up to you and depends on the severity of how bad you feel it looks whether you can continue with it until it's finished and still sell it or is it better to give that version up to try and create it from the beginning, but better than the last iteration.

I hope this helps answer your questions and guide you in navigating a situation like this; I wish you the best of luck in your art creation and selling!

-Laura Mills
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Kate’s Answer

Hi Brook!

Question 1 - how do I start a project? I usually have an idea of what I want to do. Most of the time I will draw it out in a sketch book, then once I get the sketch refined I will transfer that idea to either paper or canvas depending on the medium I am working in.

For me, starting a project is always the hardest step. I am usually filled with fear and self-doubt. What if I can't make it look the way I want it too? What if I'm not a good artist? What if people don't like it? This is very common with artists. Making art is like baring your soul to the world. So if you feel that way, you aren't alone. The good news is, once I actually sit down and get started I get into the flow and the doubt goes away.

Question 2 - What if it doesn't look right?
If a piece isn't looking the way I want it to look sometimes I will move on to another piece and come back to it later. I'm primarily a watercolorist so reworking is difficult if not impossible sometimes. With oils and acrylics painting over sections to improve the piece is an option. Recently, I was working on a pet portrait in watercolor for a dear friend whose dog had passed away. I usually start portraits by painting the eyes - because if the eye aren't right, the rest of the painting won't look right. But for some reason, this time I decided to do the background first. And wouldn't you know it? When I got to the eyes I messed them up. There really wasn't coming back from that so I had to scrap the whole thing and start over. Luckily, paper is inexpensive so it wasn't a big deal. Starting over is not a failure. You learn something from every piece you make.

I personally would never try to sell a piece that I wasn't happy with. Honestly, I don't even SHOW pieces that I'm not happy with. I might hang on to it to revisit later though if it isn't too far gone.

Hope that helps!
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chandan’s Answer

These are all brilliant questions!

1. How do you start an art project? / how do you know what to make?
I feel that a lot of us overlook our capabilities to be inspired. Inspiration can come in so many different forms, colours, shapes, etc. It can come from living or inanimate objects, and it can come simply just from you. Sometimes you may experience burnout, which can affect your artistic flow. When that happens, don't beat yourself up! Creative energy is prone to ebb and flow, because we are human. It might feel a little annoying but it definitely comes back and you might even experience surges of creativity. When this happens you will find that a lot of things might end up inspiring you and you can pull inspiration from so many places.

A lot of artists create vision boards and colour palettes, and swatches. This isnt necessary, but it does help if you have specific ideas you would like to create. It can be helpful to use social media platforms like instagram, pinterest, artstation, twitter/x, etc. to have a look at what other creators and artists have made if you don't know where to start or what your project might want to look like. Remember if you have a look at other people's art not to compare your journey and skills to theirs. Everyone's artistic journey is their own to create, and everyone's journey is unique. If you decide to pull inspiration from other artist's, please make sure to credit them! It means a lot to artists, plus it gives you a good reputation as a Creative.

2. What happens if it looks bad, do you just throw it away or to you keep it and sell it to make money?
As any sort of creator, this is entirely up to you! There aren't many rules to creating, and you can also write a few of your own just for you! Sometimes art doesn't turn out how we would like, but they all count for practice and refinement. Everything you create is a product of your journey and sometimes we have brilliant days, and some days aren't as great as we had hoped. Art is always a practice and the more that you try, the better you become, and the more you refine your skills. If you're not please with your product, you can sell it or bin it, but everything you make is always a step forward in your skills getting better. Final take: the choice is entirely up to you! If you find a buyer, you might find that there is a group of collectors out there that will really love what youve made, even if you aren't happy with it.
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