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Which field of Anthropology offers a high-paid job?

I'm currently a Sophomore in high school and interested in Socio-Cultural anthropology. I would like to double major in anthropology and business/marketing. I want to use my communication skills to open a successful company. #business-management #cultural-studies #cultural-anthropology

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Jaleel’s Answer

Hi, Valarie!


I hope this finds you well. This is a great question, and I appreciate your knowing what you want to study and your ambition for the future.


Just a little background on myself to show you why I have some insight on this topic: I graduated from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Ca with a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies and Ethnicity. This is an interdisciplinary major (many fields of study in one) with elements of History, Anthropology, Political Science, Sociology, Economics, and many other fields. In a nutshell, I studied culture through the sociological lenses of race, class, gender, and socioeconomic status (the amount of access a person has to resources like money, education, career options, etc).


Now that you know a little about me, I want to tell you a little about some of the professors I studied under. One in particular is a professor by the name of Dr. Lanita Jacobs. She has an Anthropology background, and she teaches classes on African American culture with respect to concepts of beauty as well as elements of popular culture. She uses ethnographic research styles (the study of cultures and people from the point of view of that culture and those people) to develop books, documentaries, and contribute to academia in many ways. So one career option: Professor at a University.


Here is her professional profile: http://dornsife.usc.edu/lanita-jacobs/research/


Anthropology is all about studying people and cultures. Do you have an idea of what type of cultures you want to explore?


Also, here is a website on career options from the American Anthropology Association: http://www.aaanet.org/resources/students/anthrodegree.cfm


Tell me more about the business you want to open.


Good luck, Valerie!


Best,


Jaleel Mackey

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Betty’s Answer

Hi Valerie,

I don't profess to have any personal information or background in anthropology, but I did do a quick Google search and some surprising professions popped up. Given your plan to double major, the specific professions I recommend you look into that have an amazing potential for growth for years to come are below:
https://www.geteducated.com/careers/anthropology-jobs/

5. Market Research Analyst
Median salary: $65,810
Minimum education: Bachelor’s
Estimated growth: 18%

If you’re looking for a job with great pay and ample job opportunities, consider a career as a market research analyst. With more than 738,000 jobs in the US and a much faster than average expected growth rate, this is an ideal field to put your bachelor’s in anthropology to work.

Market research analysts conduct studies to help companies understand what products people want, who the target audience is, and what the best pricing strategy is. The strong research, analytical, and communication skills you honed through your anthropology coursework are key to this position, as is your nuanced understanding of different people and cultures.

8. Social or Community Service Manager
Median salary: $69,600
Minimum education: Bachelor’s
Estimated growth: 17%

With explosive growth on the horizon, good pay, and a job you can feel good about doing, becoming a social or community service manager can be a great choice for anthropology majors. You might find yourself helping veterans, working with homeless individuals, or tackling child hunger, among many other charitable causes. You will find a good fit for your skills in communication, analyzing data, and connecting with other people.

When filling a management-level position, many groups look for someone who has a bachelor’s degree and relevant experience. You can work your way up to a leadership role by starting out in jobs such as a social worker, substance abuse counselor, or community volunteer. The need for nonprofit managers will be higher than ever in the coming years, with nearly 30,000 new jobs expected in the next decade.

9. Urban or Regional Planner
Median salary: $75,950
Minimum education: Master’s
Estimated growth: 11%

Your background in anthropology can help you understand the needs of various communities and societies, which lends itself well to a career in urban or regional planning. Planners also use tools and techniques familiar to anthropologists, such as those in research, data analysis, and presentation. All of these skills can make you an asset in this career field, and the payoff in terms of salary is enticing; the median pay for planners working for the US federal government is over $102,000 per year.

To break into this field, you generally need to complete a master’s degree accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. Employers will look for your experience planning real projects and completing internships during your graduate studies. As a planner, you can choose an area of specialty such as transportation planning, community development, historic preservation, or urban design.

12. Training and Development Manager
Median salary: $115,640
Minimum education: Bachelor’s
Estimated growth: 7%

With a median salary above $115,000, an anticipated 7% growth rate over the next decade, and only a bachelor’s-level education required, this job field checks all the boxes of a great choice for anthropology majors. Training and development managers work to create and oversee organizational training programs. In this role, you’ll get to spend much of your day interacting with and teaching others, improving employee productivity and allowing people to gain new skills to advance their careers.

Training and development managers can come from a variety of educational backgrounds, but most employers will want to see that you have some knowledge of instructional design, behavioral psychology, or educational psychology. Most importantly, you’ll want to get some work experience under your belt in management, teaching, or human resources to work up to this management-level position.

Public Relations or Fundraising Manager
Median salary: $118,430
Minimum education: Bachelor’s
Estimated growth: 9%

Do you have the people skills to get your company’s message out to the public or bring in the big donors for your cause? As a public relations or fundraising manager, you will be responsible for maintaining the public image of your employer or for managing donations for your organization. Both positions focus on outreach, communication, and connecting with others to reach a goal, skills commonly used in anthropology.

To take on this management role, you’ll first need to start in entry-level positions to gain experience. After proving your worth, you’ll be on the right track to a great career, with much faster than average expected job growth and the top positions earning more than $200,000 salary. Certifications from organizations such as the Public Relations Society of America, CFRE International, and International Association of Business Communicators can boost your resume and opportunities for advancement.

15. Advertising, Promotions, or Marketing Manager
Median salary: $141,490
Minimum education: Bachelor’s
Estimated growth: 6%

Put your understanding of people, communities, and cultures to use in a job in marketing. With an amazing salary potential, good projected job growth, and the ability to enter the field with just a bachelor’s degree, this career path is a winner on all fronts. The median annual salary for managers working specifically in advertising and PR is more than $150,000.

As an advertising, promotions, or marketing manager, you can plan traditional and digital media campaigns, conduct market research to better understand customers and market opportunities, and manage incentive programs to increase sales. Work internally for one company or serve a variety of clients working for an advertising agency. College courses, internships, or work experience in marketing, consumer behavior, market research, sales, or visual arts can help ease your transition into this rewarding career.
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J.’s Answer

Hi Valerie,

My suggestion is... Do not choose a career path based on MONEY. Everyone would love to open a successful business and be rich but that is simply not how the world works. Do what you really love because you care about it, then the money will follow. If you love anthropology thats great but money should not be the factor or motivation.

Remember money does not bring TRUE happiness. How many homes, cars, handbags do you really need? Just one or two :)

Wish you the best.
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