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what is a good job to keep in mind for someone who wishes to have a hands on job?

I would like a career where l can use my hands and not be behind a desk all day so i was wondering what were the requirements for such a job

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From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Joanna Rose’s Answer

Hello Christian,

A good job for someone who enjoys hands-on work could be in sectors such as skilled trades, healthcare, or technology. Roles like carpenter, electrician, or plumber provide practical, tangible tasks, while healthcare professions like nursing or physical therapy offer direct patient care. In technology, roles such as hardware engineer or IT technician involve hands-on tasks. It's crucial to consider the training and education required for these careers, and to ensure the role aligns with your interests and long-term goals.
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Jason’s Answer

Hi Christian,

It really boils down to your personal interests. There's a wide range of careers involving hands-on work. Common examples include trades such as plumbing, electrical work, and construction. Many healthcare roles like nursing, physical therapy, and surgery also involve a lot of hands-on tasks instead of just sitting behind a desk.

Surprisingly, even some IT roles like network administration can be quite hands-on. Many network administrators I've met enjoy the opportunity to step away from their desks and work directly with various types of equipment and servers. It's a lot more hands-on than most people assume.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Christian,

A good job to consider for someone who prefers a hands-on role is becoming an Electrician.

Electricians are skilled tradespeople who specialize in installing, maintaining, and repairing electrical systems in various settings such as residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. This career choice offers the opportunity to work with your hands daily, troubleshoot electrical issues, and contribute to the safe functioning of electrical systems.

Requirements for becoming an Electrician typically include:

Education: While a high school diploma is usually the minimum requirement, pursuing vocational training or an apprenticeship program is essential to gain the necessary skills and knowledge in electrical work.

Apprenticeship: Completing an apprenticeship under the supervision of a licensed electrician is crucial for gaining practical experience and understanding the intricacies of the trade.

Licensing: Electricians are required to obtain a license to work professionally. Licensing requirements vary by state or country but generally involve passing an exam to demonstrate competency.

Skills: Strong problem-solving skills, attention to detail, physical stamina, and good hand-eye coordination are important attributes for success in this field.

Career Outlook: The demand for electricians is expected to remain steady or grow due to ongoing construction projects, renovations, and the need for maintenance of existing electrical systems. Electricians can find employment opportunities with electrical contractors, maintenance departments of various industries, or even start their own business.

Hiring: To pursue a career as an Electrician, individuals can explore job openings with electrical contractors, construction companies, government agencies, or facilities management companies. Networking within the industry and showcasing relevant experience through internships or apprenticeships can also enhance job prospects.

By considering a career as an Electrician, individuals can fulfill their desire for a hands-on job that offers diverse challenges and opportunities for growth within the electrical industry.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) - The BLS provides comprehensive data on job outlooks, salaries, educational requirements, and licensing information for various occupations including Electricians.

National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) - NECA offers insights into the electrical contracting industry, apprenticeship programs, and resources for individuals interested in pursuing a career as an Electrician.

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) - IBEW represents electricians and provides information on training programs, safety standards, and union opportunities within the electrical trade.

These sources were consulted to ensure accurate and up-to-date information regarding the requirements and prospects of a career as an Electrician.

God Bless You,
JC.
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Katrine’s Answer

Hello Christian,

There are a lot of fields of work you can get into that let you use your hands to work!

If you want to attend a four-year university, a couple good areas of study to keep in mind that have plenty of future growth potential and opportunities are Product Design and/or Industrial Product Design! These two college majors have courses with assignments that require you to design and build things with your hands such as product prototypes. Product Design and Industrial Product Design are related but distinct from one another. Product Design is a more general term that includes a broader range of products (consumer goods, electronics, furniture, as well as digital products like apps and websites) while Industrial Product Design focuses on products manufactured for commercial or industrial purposes (cars, computers, machinery and tools).

Welding is another in demand job that is very hands on and doesn't require one to attend a four-year university. Training for a welding career can be obtained at trade schools, technical institutes or community college. You can obtain certification or an associate's degree in welding and training covers topics such as techniques, metallurgy, blueprint reading and safety procedures. Apprenticeships offer those who have been trained/certified the opportunity to gain experience and typically last 3-4 years.

These are only a few of the many fields of study available to avoid being stuck behind a desk all day and lets you use your hands.

Katrine recommends the following next steps:

Do research on different careers and their future outlook (meaning how many openings are currently available as well as will be available in the future) by checking out the U.S. Bureau of Statistics [https://www.bls.gov/ooh/]
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Kimberly’s Answer

I’m like you and really hate sitting at a desk. Because of this, I’ve taken up photography and really enjoy it. The only downside is that it’s a constant hustle when you first start. It takes time, dedication, and networking to get your name out there and brush up on skills you may already have. Saying that, portrait is a very hands on way of communication. You’re working with both people and the camera in a fast pace environment. Places like JC Penny are always hiring or Portrait Studios for school photography would both be a great place to start. It’s a very fun and rewarding way to give back and do something you love at the same time.
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Shelia’s Answer

Hello Christian,

There's a world of exciting career opportunities waiting for you, both within and outside the realm of college education. Choosing a career is a significant milestone, and it's crucial to find a path that truly fuels your passion. Identify what motivates you and make sure your choice aligns with those driving forces, not just the expectations of others, unless it genuinely excites you. If you're a fan of practical, hands-on work, there's a wealth of opportunities in both college and vocational school settings. The range of study fields today far surpasses what was available three decades ago. Depending on your interests, you might even consider pursuing an associate degree, which typically takes two years.

Vocational or trade schools provide practical training in a variety of fields such as automotive technology, medical assistance, hairdressing, certified nursing assistance, electronics technology, paralegal studies, and truck driving.

I'm not certain of your current grade level, but I'd recommend exploring any vocational courses your high school might offer.

Wishing you all the best on your journey!
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