4 answers
Updated Viewed 678 times Translate

How can I become a manufacturing engineer with a mechanical engineering degree?

Hi, I'm currently a junior level mechanical engineering student with an interest in manufacturing because I've been reading a few magazines about it (Automation World, Pro Food World, etc if anyone's familiar) but I'm still trying to figure out the skills and education that I need for the industry. I know I need to learn about lean and Six Sigma, but should I understand anything else? #manufacturing #mechanical-engineering #mechanical-or-industrial-engineering #manufacturing-engineering #industrial-engineering


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
122
100% of 4 Pros
100% of 1 Students

4 answers


Updated Translate

Glenn S.’s Answer

Melvin,

That is great that you are asking now. A majority of the manufacturing engineers that I have worked with have a degree in mechanical engineering. There is another role that is half way between mechanical engineering and design engineering, call NPI engineering or New Product Introduction Engineering. They work with both teams to ensure that what is designed can be produced. They are involved from the early design phase to highlight issues from previous product to make sure that design engineers consider those issues early.


From a true manufacturing engineering role, the ones with the mechanical engineering degree take on the technical challenges of automation design and set up, jig and fixture design, etc.

Glenn S. recommends the following next steps:

Apply for a summer internship as a mechanical engineer in a factory environment
Reach out to the engineering community to discuss your interest. This could be through your professors, through career fairs on campus, or through parents of parents of your friends.

Interesting, I've never heard of NPI Engineering. But it's really reassuring to know that many manufacturing engineers have the same degree I'm seeking. Thanks a lot for commenting! Melvin S.

2
100% of 1 Pros
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Sam’s Answer

Hello Melvin,


All you need to do is apply for a manufacturing engineering job opening. That's it. The job posting will list in the requirements the kind of degree they are looking for. Mechancial engineering and electrical engineering are common degrees.


Since you are a junior in college, I would suggest that you do internships with a company to earn some experience before you graduate. After you graduate, you can then apply for entry level manufacturing engineering jobs.


Sam


Sam, your answer is great. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise with Melvin! At this moment there are more than 1k unanswered questions so I want to encourage you to keep going! So many students will benefit tremendously from hearing from you. Keep up the great work! Jordan Rivera COACH

Thank you Sam! I've already applied to many internships, and still actively applying, so I'm just waiting for an interview. Thanks again. Melvin S.

That's great Melvin!! Keep up the good work!! Sam Seldon

2
100% of 1 Pros
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Ashrith’s Answer

Melvin,


Addressing your specific question of what other skills you might need, it would be beneficial to have knowledge about contemporary manufacturing methods which includes Additive Manufacturing (3D printing). Also, companies do prefer candidates with some 3D CAD experience with basic Geometric Dimension & Tolerance knowledge. Knowing how to interpret a 2D manufacturing drawing is a great plus.

Please don't feel like you have to master these skills before you land a job, most of them you'll acquire on-the-job (that's what internships are for). This is just to let you know what you would need in the near future.


Hope this helps. Best of luck!


Cheers,

Ash


Awesome. I actually have 3D printing knowledge and use autocad and fusion 360 for a robot arm research project I do at school! Thanks for sharing! Melvin S.

1
100% of 1 Students
Updated Translate

Zak’s Answer

Yes. A "manufacturing" engineer comes in many flavors. Electrical, mechanical, industrial systems, programming, ect depending on the type of manufacturing especially how automated or labor intensive. Many jobs will list the engineers that maintain manufacturing as manufacturing/mechanical engineering study. Many schools who don't have manufacturing direct the schools to mechanical like my college did or to industrial systems engineers - many of my colleagues who did mechanical went into manufacturing.


Awesome, thanks for the comment! Melvin S.

1
100% of 1 Students