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What are some key tips to achieving a 4.0 GPA in engineering undergrad ?

Going into engineering this fall, and wanted to know what are some tips for doing well in the program? I have about seven classes first semester so I am a bit worried.

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Kris’s Answer

Engineering school can indeed be more rigorous than other academic fields. If you have friends majoring in business or education, be prepared for a heavier workload and less leisure time. However, maintaining an organized routine is your golden key to success.

Take some time to explore your learning style. Do you prefer jotting down notes by hand during lectures, or does typing them out work better for you? Maybe you absorb more by simply listening to the lecture? Perhaps reading the material before class and preparing questions for the professor enhances your understanding? Or does your focus improve when you sit at the front or the back of the room? Remember, there's no universal right answer, as everyone's learning style is unique.

Be aware that your freshman year might be the toughest in your four to five-year journey. Some professors might use mid-term exams as a way to push you to reflect on your career choice.

Depending on your school's size, professors might offer office hours or study groups. Embrace these opportunities to collaborate on homework. Connect with fellow engineering students who share your mindset. Together, you can encourage each other and stay accountable.

So, while engineering school may be challenging, remember that it's also a platform for growth, learning, and forming lasting friendships. Stay organized, understand your learning style, and make the most of the resources available to you. You've got this!
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Vangela’s Answer

Find serious people in your major or in your classes to study with. When I was in college, I had a study group with people who were at the same point in the major as I was, so I had a built-in study group. My gpa went up significantly.
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Bryan’s Answer

Hello!
Everything Kris mentioned is great advice.
Something I'd add is make sure your notes make sense to you. Sometimes the professor will write someone on the board (or the presentation) that doesn't quite make sense. So something I tried to do is rewrite them in terms that worked better for me (and were still correct). This often meant I needed to go to office hours or ask questions during lectures.
Don't be afraid to ask questions.

Another thing I would suggest is joining a club. The club I joined was able to teach me a lot about my major and in some cases I was able to go into a class with a basic understanding of the subject. This is also a great way to meet people who will be in your classes.

Above all else make sure you enjoy yourself. College is challenging but is also fun. Getting a 4.0 is a great goal but it's not the end of the world if you don't get it.

Good Luck!
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Ron’s Answer

Hi, Jazzy-

First of all, congratulations on getting into engineering school. That in itself is a great accomplishment.

You most likely already have good study habits and time management skills, but these will be tested in college.

As Kris so wisely stated earlier, you may need to adjust your learning style to best suit the class. But also see how the professor teaches the class. Do your due diligence and research the professors for each class (read reviews on them). Some professors just might be more in line with how you prefer to learn.

Dedicate the appropriate amount of time needed for studying for each class. Some classes could be easier, so learn to focus your time on the areas that need your attention.

But you also need to make time for yourself! Take study breaks often, even if it's only for a few minutes. Take electives that you never thought of ever taking or couldn't take in high school. Go to concerts, sport events, etc. - but take some time away from engineering classes and explore what college has to offer.

I wish you the best of luck in college!

Ron L
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